Checkering Tools


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Abe
March 23, 2003, 02:31 PM
Looking for opinions on hand-checkering tools. I've found Dem-Bart and Gunline in the Brownell's catalog. Is either much better than the other?

Also, are there any good reference sites for checkering? I have Monty Kennedy's book as a reference. Any other good ones?

Thanks,

Abe

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dfariswheel
March 23, 2003, 03:43 PM
Checkering tools is strictly a matter of personal preference.
One isn't really "better" than the other.

The only advice I could offer is to buy basic, cheap versions of both and see which brand "fits" you, then buy the expensive full set.
Second, the carbide checkering cutters don't dull for a LOOOOONG time, and seem to cut better and smoother.

Next, invest in a GOOD adjustable arm light, and an Opti-visor magnifier.

The Kennedy book is the best. About anything worth having, Brownells' sells. I'd call them and ask their advice, but I'm sure they will recommend Kennedy.

4 eyed six shooter
March 23, 2003, 08:35 PM
I agree that both styles of tools are good and that you should try both. I learned checkering in gunsmithing school and the one outside source that I found very helpful was a video by Joe Balickie called Gunstock Checkering. Brownells sells it on Pg 190 of their catalog. It's not cheap, but is worth the price. If you are really serious about learning checkering Monty Kennedy's book and this video are a must.
Be sure to get an OptiVisor (I like the 2 1/2 power) and a checkering cradle.
The Jointer, 60 degree bent needle file and the Veiner tool are also very helpful. Get several pieces of flat hard wood to learn on before you start sawing on a gunstock. Place your light at an angle so you can see the lines as you cut them, go slow and don't try to cut full depth on the first cut.
It is something that takes pratice, but in time you can turn out some first class work.
Good luck with your project, John K

Abe
March 27, 2003, 08:59 AM
Thanks alot for the information. I'll look for the video.

One last question, typically how many LPI is the checkering on an M1911 grip (standard double diamond)?

Thanks again,

Abe

swampgator
March 27, 2003, 11:58 PM
One last question, typically how many LPI is the checkering on an M1911 grip (standard double diamond)?


I believe it's 18 lpi.

Abe
March 28, 2003, 12:38 AM
Thanks swampgator.

- Abe

4 eyed six shooter
March 28, 2003, 03:52 AM
The 18 LPI is a good spacing to start out at. It gets more difficult as the LPI increases.
Have fun with your project, John K

Khornet
March 28, 2003, 02:44 PM
I like the "Full- View" tools Brownells sells. They are adjustable for cutting angle.

A must for pointing up near the borders, and useful for layout, is the Brownells short-cutter 90-degree tool. Cutting head is only about 1/8" long, shank has a right angle bend, so you have great visibility and control in tight spots.

Checkering is very doable even for us artistically challenged types, and very satissfying. My hero is Dale Goens, whose work is the sharpest, cleanest, understatedly elegant I've seen. Is he still around?

dirtwater doc
March 16, 2005, 09:12 PM
I prefer gunlines tools myself they have a more aggresive tooth and are somewhat sharpenable.
Some tips that was given me that helped me are spend alot of time on layout, always cut your first passes cross grain as it is less difficult to cut over the furrough while cutting with the grain on your second or crossing passes, and if you make a mistake put it away for awile and try later - better to take more time than to ruin a nice piece of wood wood is terribly unforgiving. good luck.

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