Anyone else NOT like the hand prime tool?


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Chainsaw
January 3, 2003, 01:04 PM
Mine was an RCBS. I tried to prime some LC brass with the crimp removed and Remington 7 1/2 primers. Worst experience (after that doctor slap me of course)of my life. I bought the tool specifically for that and it left primers seated high medium and only a few were just right. Fixed the 50 I primed up on the Rockchucker, and went back to press priming.

Sold the RCBS and won't go back. Anyone have a similiar problem?

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Sisco
January 3, 2003, 01:55 PM
Never used a RCBS, do use a Lee. Never had a problem.

Trini
January 3, 2003, 02:17 PM
Only way I prime my cases. Have been using a Lee for many years. I can check make sure the primer is seated correctly and to the correct depth. Never timed myself but figure about 500 - 600 per hour.

braindead0
January 3, 2003, 02:18 PM
I use and RCBS hand primer on occasion, probably put 2000 primers in with it and never had a problem with it.

Certainly no high primers.....except one time when I had the ram in backwards (oops).

Bob C
January 3, 2003, 02:43 PM
I used a Lee for over 20 years with no problems at all, and still do occasionally although most of my loading now is on a Dillon press which has a priming function.

A few years ago I bought an RCBS when Midway had them on sale. It did not work for me, at all.

Nanook
January 3, 2003, 03:02 PM
I've had the same experience as Bob C., used the Lee Auto-Prime before I had the Dillon. It's still in a cabinet on the reloading bench, I will use it again on my single-stage press. I had zero problems with the Lee when I used it. I loaded 4 or 5 thousand rounds using it.
I do more handgun shooting lately and reload all those calibers on the Dillon.

RobW
January 3, 2003, 03:05 PM
I also use the Lee without problems. They anyway give a warning not to use other primers than CCI or Winchester.

cordex
January 3, 2003, 03:40 PM
Never had a problem with mine.

It does require developing a "feel" for the seating depth.

444
January 3, 2003, 03:41 PM
I have been using a Lee, the same Lee, for about 15 years. Never had a problem. Have recommended it any number of times on these boards. I also have slacked off quite a bit since I know have two Dillon 550Bs, but there are still quite a few calibers I load on the single stage. I only use my Dillons for those calibers that I shoot in high volume.

Nero Steptoe
January 3, 2003, 04:39 PM
I've loaded several thousand rounds of .223 LC brass using the RCBS hand primer. The RCBS tool took a little getting used to after the Lee tool, but I much prefer the RCBS now. I'm loading on a progressive now that seats primers just fine.

I'd suggest that something was wrong with the RCBS that was seating primers high....maybe the shell holder or the ram in backwards, as the other guy said.

Jon Coppenbarger
January 3, 2003, 05:21 PM
I have used the rcbs for about a year or so now and love it.
I shoot in competition in service rifle highpower and do do quite alot to prep my brass before it gets fired.
I usually buy pre-processed once fired rvo l.c. .223 brass that has had the crimp removed.
this is my process.
#1 run threw the giraud trimmer to trim to the same length for every piece and at the same time chamfer both the outside and inside all at the same time.

#2 deburr the flash hole and ream it and look into every case the first time after deburring the flash hole to insure it is perfect.(only need to do it once)

#3 uniform and clean the primer pocket on every piece of brass so they are all exactly the same and between loads clean the pocket every time.

I do other things to the brass and loads but you should not be interested in that unless you are trying to get everything as perfect as you can.

I also use rem. 7 1/2 primers or cci bbr4 primers.
the rem. for everything 300 yards and under and the cci for 600 yards.

I like a hand primer as you can get the feel for how the primer seats and that way you can always detect a loose primer pocket or one that needs to be uniformed more.

the sinclair hand primer is one of the next on my list but last year did about 4,000 on my rcbs hand primer and in the last month about 1,500 all with out any problems except having to keep puting primers in the tray.

Peter M. Eick
January 3, 2003, 06:51 PM
The only problem I ever had with my Lee primer is after about 15 years, it wore loose enough that it needed to be replaced. The factory would refurbish it for 1/2 the cost, but I said the heck with it and just bought another.

Great unit, it reloads ever rifle case I shoot.

Mal H
January 3, 2003, 07:55 PM
Chainsaw - I've used the RCBS hand priming tool for years and have had zero problems with it. I strongly suspect your brass/primer combo may have had more to do with the problems than the tool.

In fact, I could take your post and reverse "Rockchucker" for "RCBS hand tool" to describe my experience with priming with those two tools (except for the selling part). I love the Rockchucker press, but priming with it, IMO, leaves a heck of a lot to be desired.

PALongbow
January 3, 2003, 09:21 PM
I use the RCBS hand primer tool and have never had a problem seating primers.

Ron

Kitt
January 3, 2003, 09:37 PM
Every once in a while my Lee will put the primer in upside down but I've used it a long time so its probably time to get a new one.

Chainsaw
January 3, 2003, 09:52 PM
Mal and others, It could possibly have been my primer-brass combination or I wasn't using the tool right. I have not given up on anything like that before, but I was so disappointed after hearing all the great things about the primer tool, that I thought it would be a piece of cake to use.

Someday I might try the Lee priming tool, and see if I have any better results.------------Chainsaw

Frohickey
January 3, 2003, 10:18 PM
Nope. I like my Lee AutoPrime.

Only time I had high primers is when I did not check to make sure the primer pockets are okay, sometimes, primer debris will make it not fully seat.

That, and the calluses I get on my thumb. :D

Cal4D4
January 3, 2003, 11:40 PM
Overall crummy priming results on my progressive - LNL AP - so I use the RCBS handtool. No problems, just make sure you aren't using an old Lee shellholder you had sitting around.

pooch
January 4, 2003, 01:42 AM
I used the Lee tool for many years. It is a good, fairly sensitive, and inexpensive tool. When it wears out just toss it and buy another one. I now use the K&M tool. It's a one at a time primer, which I like. It's a little more expensive, but high quality and high sensitivity. You only have to buy this tool once....pooch

agony
January 4, 2003, 02:44 AM
My RCBS handprimer is well-worn after years of use. It works well for me, and primes better than my Dillon. In fact, I ever ever used the priming function on m single-stage presses because the handheld has been great.

MoNsTeR
January 4, 2003, 11:20 PM
I have a Lee and an RCBS. The Lee works great, the RCBS is junk. It has a list of design flaws so long it would make me red in the face just typing them out, UGH! :banghead: :cuss: :fire:

WESHOOT2
January 5, 2003, 10:04 AM
One day during production I broke both my LEE hand-primers; tops cracked off (over-heated?).

Bought two RCBS with the 'blast shield'; used often for specific production runs.
Perfect.

bpisler
January 5, 2003, 11:40 AM
I've broken the top off of one lee hand primer,maybe from the lack of proper lube,other than that lee's have worked well for over 9 years.

Nero Steptoe
January 5, 2003, 11:40 AM
"One day during production I broke both my LEE hand-primers; tops cracked off (over-heated?). "

More likely is the fact that pot metal isn't very durable.

WESHOOT2
January 5, 2003, 12:02 PM
I've broken: LEE Challenger (first run), LEE Reloader (first push of lever); LEE hand-priming tools (2).
(I use a few single-stages for flaring/charge-dumping/specials/development.)

I know potmetal (kid, junkie toys).

I like some LEE stuff; dies, chamfer tool, pocket cleaner, trimmers, but I still recommend a used RCBS/Lyman/Redding press before buying a new LEE.
Potmetal, you know.............


Your results may vary.

griz
January 6, 2003, 06:33 AM
I’ve used the Lee and RCBS hand primers. On both of them it is easy to feel the primer seating at the correct depth. The Lee works well but wears out fast. It also requires special shell holders. The RCBS looks like it will never wear out but mine doesn’t always feed the primers from the tray. They get hung up where they are hard to see and sometimes flip upside down.

Most of my priming is now done on an RCBS 2000 with the primers in strips. It works fine.

Bottom Gun
January 6, 2003, 12:47 PM
I've had trouble seating large primers with my RCBS hand priming tool. It does OK with small primers, but not large ones.
The large seating rod is shorter than the small rod. That's the problem.
I've called RCBS several times and each time they send me the same length rod or some other replacement part which doesn't solve the problem. I've given up on RCBS.
Right now, I only use it for small primers. If I want to use it for large, I guess I'll have to make my own seating rod for the darned thing.
Might be easier to simply buy another brand.

bogie
January 6, 2003, 01:42 PM
Precision vs. durability...

I go with Lee over most of the others. I use a K&M for 6PPC, a Neuler (antique pre-Sinclair) for 6BR (.308 case head with small primer, and Lee for everything else. The Lee shell holders _are_ standard - they're used by K&M and Sinclair, and work very well.

I've noticed maybe 3-4 non-Lee/K&M/Sinclair priming tools at benchrest matches. Most of the "production/durable" tools just don't have the precise feel.

Timothy
January 6, 2003, 02:42 PM
My RCBS hand hand primer works fine and always has. No problems for many K.

Larry Ashcraft
January 6, 2003, 03:45 PM
Hornady.

I broke the tops off of 2 Lee Auto Primes over 20 years and then bought the Hornady tool. It works great. Costs twice as much as the Lee but looks like it should outlast the Lee at least three times over.

Bottom Gun
January 7, 2003, 08:44 AM
Larry,

Will the Hornady use RCBS shell holders?

Unisaw
January 7, 2003, 09:04 AM
I use the RCBS hand priming tool for all of my reloading. The only problem I have had is that the tray cover sometimes loosens enough that a primer can turn over. Overall, I'm happy with the tool.

Larry Ashcraft
January 7, 2003, 10:06 AM
Bottom Gun,

Yes, the Hornady uses standard shell holders. I've only used mine for a couple hundred cases, but I'm sold on it. Where you use your thumb with the Lee, the Hornady works more like a pair of pliers.

Poodleshooter
January 7, 2003, 12:29 PM
I broke my Lee AutoPrime last night after several thousand rounds. The lever snapped where it pivots on the link. The link is also showing a great deal of wear (basically a groove is worn into it). I wonder why they can't just make the thing out of steel? Even if it doubles the price, it would still be nearly the same price as the other brands, and would be far simpler.
I'm debating whether to buy several years of Lee levers and toggle links, an extra Lee AutoPrime and some parts, or just get an RCBS handpriming tool.

JB3rd
January 7, 2003, 01:25 PM
2nd vote for the Hornady. Got two, one for large primers and one for small. (actually, only ordered one...two got shipped, vendor said their mistake--keep it:D ) Only a few hundred rounds through each, but both work fine. IMHO, ergonomics are superior to Lee, as squeezing like pliers provides me greater sensitivity to the seating of the primer and doesn't tire my thumb.

Haven't tried the RCBS, but like the idea of the primer strips--no chance of spilling primers from a tray, and CCI sells their primers already packaged in the strips. Look ma, no mess! (and no exploding vacuum cleaners when lost primers are sucked up):)

Now that I'm thinking about it....might have to get one of those, too. Another 2for1 would be great

swifter
January 19, 2003, 09:48 PM
Used a Lee for years until I got a misfire problem with my .338.
Finally tracked it down to the POS was seating primers about .007" off the bottom of the pocket. rebuilt the Lee, still did it. Never did figure out why, just tossed it, now use a Bonanza benchmounted tool and love it
Tom

ed dixon
January 24, 2003, 01:34 AM
Primed my first 100 with RCBS tool that came in the mail a few days ago. One turned primer was easily cleared and the rest went in without a hitch. Very nice so far. Think it was this thread that prompted me to order one.

Lancel
January 24, 2003, 01:52 AM
Started with a Lee Auto primer. But It's been in the back of the drawer for years since I prefer it's replacement, a RCBS Hand Primer.

Larry

Bullet
January 24, 2003, 09:46 PM
I use the Sinclair stainless priming tool. These will last longer than me. Works great too.

4godsako
January 24, 2003, 10:53 PM
I don't know what these hand primer manufactures mean when they badmouth press/ram type primers?
It usually stated 'one can't feel the primer seating' ..............................Hmmmmmm? Well I can and I've been using a Lee Challenger for years.
I know it's considered an entry level press but I find the Lee ram prime faultless.
Got to admit I have never even tried a hand primer but I'm sure they have their advantages!
Like my mum's kitchen............. I just don't want TOO many gadgets........

coonan357
January 30, 2003, 01:16 AM
I have the lee autoprime II and the rcbs hand primer , I use the had primer for when I want to prime a load of shells while watching tv , and the auto prime when I lock myself up in my little room from the crazies outside .. BTW they both work well for the amount of priming I have done

Yo
February 6, 2003, 01:18 PM
THE best hand-priming system in existance right now is the RCBS hand tool that uses APS strips.

I wish it had more leverage, but nothing is easier to use or more trouble free. Just pop in a strip, seat a primer, and it advances one notch to the next primer.

It even has a universal shell holder.

I've tried other hand primers--Lee, RCBS with the tray, even the Sinclair. This system is the best, by far.

http://www.rcbs.com/images/rcbsaps.jpg

yds1000two
August 23, 2010, 03:34 PM
;)Hi, this new priming tool might change your mind about hand priming. Its CNC billet aluminum and stainless steel. It uses lee trays. A dial on the side of the body adjust ramrod lingth,primer seating presure is adjustable-excellent feedback. also has a safty that only alows one peimer to be seated at a time. Oh I forgot, Its 100% USA made by 21st century shooting inc. I been reloading more than 33 years this the best priming tool I have seen yet. Thanks JR

PT1911
August 23, 2010, 03:48 PM
7 years, 6 months....I bet it was sleeping well too!....

GW Staar
August 23, 2010, 05:29 PM
Mine was an RCBS. I tried to prime some LC brass with the crimp removed and Remington 7 1/2 primers. Worst experience (after that doctor slap me of course)of my life. I bought the tool specifically for that and it left primers seated high medium and only a few were just right. Fixed the 50 I primed up on the Rockchucker, and went back to press priming.

Sold the RCBS and won't go back. Anyone have a similiar problem?

Wow! All those posts and nobody hit upon the problem. There's more than likely nothing wrong with your hand primer unless you got a lemon.

Some LC brass is notorious for not swaging well, and if you chamfer instead of swaging you've got to make damn sure "all" of the crimped area is gone. It you leave a little, your hand primer will deform the primers going in.

If you swage, sometimes a tiny circle of brass is sheared and drops into the pocket...which means the primer seats high. Your press primer has way more torque, and only means the primers were "forced" to fit.

Lucky day for the guy you sold your RCBS primer to.

I also agree with the post saying the RCBS APS hand primer is the best of the best. The Sinclair is also wonderful.....if you like to prime one at a time...I don't!

jcwit
August 23, 2010, 06:28 PM
After using the press priming tool for the first couple of months I moved up to a Hornady hand primer, then was given a Lee hand priming tool as we know them today, then acquired a couple of the old one at a time Lee tools from the early days of Lee. All these tools are now for dedicated calibers mostly. For precision reloading I use a K&M hand primer with excellant results, frankly can't see the expense of $100 bucks for the Sinclare, Way, Way overpriced or they haven't discovered CNC machinery, K&M runs approx $40 today.

As far as having problems priming Lake City brass I also think the problem was in case prep and not with the Lee hand priming tools.

paperpuncher49
August 23, 2010, 07:09 PM
Chainsaw-
The only question I would ask is was the crimp really removed? Sounds to me like a primer pocket problem. I have used the RBCS and Lee hand tools for 1000s and 1000s of rounds over a period of many years and I won't claim I never had a problem, but every time I did it wasn't the fault of the hand tool(s).

floydster
August 23, 2010, 07:39 PM
I have a new LNL pro, but it absolutely sucks for priming, any little media any where near the press will screw up the priming!!
I hand prime with a lee for large and small primers, after 30,000 primed it's the only way to go.:)
Floydster

Hondo 60
August 23, 2010, 08:00 PM
I tried a Lee hand primer & let's just say I like doing it on the press a whole lot better.

Mal H
August 23, 2010, 08:47 PM
For all you folks responding to Chainsaw, he hasn't logged in for over 3 1/2 years.

yds1000two, I have to ask, why in the world would you resurrect a thread that is well over 7 years old and talking about the RCBS hand primer only to introduce a new hand priming tool? The "New Thread" button works just as well as the "Post Reply" button.

bds
August 23, 2010, 08:52 PM
why in the world would you resurrect a thread that is well over 7 years old and talking about the RCBS hand primer only to introduce a new hand priming tool?
Maybe because many posters ask that you do a "search" before starting a new thread?

With that said, 7 years ... :rolleyes:

Mal H
August 23, 2010, 08:56 PM
Maybe because many posters ask that you do a "search" before starting a new thread?That doesn't mean you have to reply to any of the old threads you found! It just means your question may have already been answered. When there is no question to be answered, then an old thread is not the thing to tack on your new info.

The reason for this is obvious and well illustrated by this very thread. Most everyone responding, with a few exceptions, thinks the thread is fairly new and is answering the original poster, while the new post is going practically unnoticed.

Captcurt
August 23, 2010, 09:04 PM
I've completely worn out 2 Lees. Don't know about the RCBS.

bds
August 23, 2010, 09:16 PM
That doesn't mean you have to reply to any of the old threads you found! It just means your question may have already been answered. When there is no question to be answered, then an old thread is not the thing to tack on your new info.
I agree, but I have a feeling that people will continue to resurrect old threads from time to time for some reason.

jcwit
August 23, 2010, 10:08 PM
Never noticed how old it was, WOW, 7 years old.

yds1000two
August 24, 2010, 11:37 AM
Hi, Its alive!! Sorry about that. Just wanted someone to check out this new priming tool. Thanks, JR

GW Staar
August 24, 2010, 12:23 PM
Ha, I didn't notice the date either. My thoughts remain...all those posts and nobody's '03 post even suggested that the swage might be at fault not the RCBS hand primer....sheesh.

As for the instigator of this resurrection...I can give him some slack...he's new.;)

I'd suggest you learn how to use the "link tool" and link us to the web site where your "new tool" is located...and start a new thread that says "New Hand Priming Tool"

Go to your tool's web site and highlight the url...then hit Control-C to copy it.
Then using the "link tool" (world and chain icon) Control-V the url into the tool. Like this: http://21stcenturyshooting.com/Priming_Tool.html

Then if you want go back to the site and right-click on the picture of it. At that menu pick "copy image location".....then go back to your post and click the yellow mountain icon and control-V the picture in. Like this:
http://21stcenturyshooting.com/images/dsc04533_qrvc_el7s.jpg

THR pro just like that!

I suggest you try it....then "they will come" :) and MAL H can put a lock on this old thread and put it back to sleep.

Wildkow
August 25, 2010, 07:36 PM
I'm an idiot when it gets to priming . . .

Can't get my Dillon XL650 to prime .223 consistently.

Can't get my Lee Handprimer to prime .223 at all.

I'm screwed. . . :banghead::fire::cuss:

But I can successfully resurrect or help resurrect 7 year old threads! :D

Blackrock
August 25, 2010, 07:57 PM
Yep an old thread revisited.
I now have four LEE hand primers all ready to gofor all four primer sizes that I use.
It's handier that way. And no Ihave never broken one yet and three of these are well used yard sale finds.

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