Please explain "Distinguished", "High Master", etc.


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Sven
April 26, 2003, 11:44 PM
I see that scores for each match have these labels, but some of you are talking about getting points for your 'cards'.

Could you explain how this all works?

Thanks,

-s

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BlindRat
April 27, 2003, 05:23 AM
In NRA Highpower, you can earn progressively higher classifications as your score average increases. The highest classification is High Master which means you averaged 97% for 300 rounds in NRA Approved or Registered Matches. The other classifications would be;
Master - 94%
Expert 90%
Sharp Shooter 85%
Marksman <85%
Unclassified Master - means you don't have a classification, thus shoot against the Master Class shooters.
(it's worth mentioning that at any class you can voluntarily compete in a higher class...right Steve?)

The Distinguished Rifleman Award is an honor specific to Service Rifles and awarded by the CMP.

The CMP runs a specific type of match which is always a 500 aggregate fired at the full distance (500 or 600 yards). They are generally fired in conjunction with a State Championship or Regional Match and are called EIC (Excellence in Competion) or "Leg Matches". Some of the unique aspects of Leg Matches are that there are no sighters allowed during the match, and those finishing in the top 10% of the non-distinguished shooters are awarded "Leg Points". You get 10, 8, or 6 points depending on where you fall in that upper 10%. You are allowed only 3 local "Leg Matches" and one Perry Leg Match in a year. When you accumulate 30 points (in your lifetime), you receive the Distinguished Rifleman's Award (aka "the Badge").

Bling Bling Baybee!!!
http://www.hunting-pictures.com/members/BlingRat/DistBlingBling4a.jpg

Steve Smith
April 27, 2003, 09:03 AM
it's worth mentioning that at any class you can voluntarily compete in a higher class...right Steve?)

That's right, and that's what I ended up doing. The NRA isn't exactly fast when it comes to changing your classification, so sometimes you have to do it yourself and let the card come later.

Konrad
April 30, 2003, 05:30 PM
You can compete in any higher class except High Master.

Steve Smith
April 30, 2003, 06:39 PM
Correctomundo! Extra points to those who know why. Blind Rat and Konrad may not play! ;)

M1911
May 1, 2003, 07:16 PM
Most important definition: Distinguished and/or High Master means someone is a whole heck of a lot better than I am :(

Steve Smith
May 5, 2003, 11:05 AM
Ok, the reason, as I understand it:

High Masters and Masters are often very close to each other for scores. Close enough that they are squadded together so that they can compete against each other. If there are enough HMs, you would fill an entire squad with just them. In that case, you would do a disservice to an HM or true Master if you were a Marksman who signed up in the HM class because you might bump one to the 2nd relay and therefore give him different (usually worse) wind to deal with.

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