Home made solvents - cheap


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Wyobuckaroo
December 25, 2002, 12:26 PM
Howdy All
Read the stuff about Hoppeys and thought this might help someone.
One little money saver I have used over the years is this.
1 part K-1 kerosene
1 part cheap paint thinner
1 part Dexron III ATF
This works good as a cleaning solvent. Use in a well ventelated area, away from combustion source. In other words common sence. This may not replace Hoppeys #9, or Sweets, or 7.62, but is will clean most of the crud on a daily basis. Then use your specialty cleaner for lead, plastic, copper fouling.

Also for a good light lubricant this works.
1 part K-1 kersene
1 part Dexron III ATF

These are adaptations of an old Hatchers Lab/National Ordinance formulas? These can be mixed up for about 1/4 to 1/10 the price of a lot of ther products.
Anyone have any experience with stuff like this? Give a shout.
Wyo

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griz
December 25, 2002, 01:42 PM
Sounds like a variation of Ed's Red. I've been using that for a couple months and like it so far. It doesn't remove copper that great but is fine for plain old grit and grunge.

Gewehr98
December 25, 2002, 01:58 PM
Anhydrous lanolin optional. Just mixed up a couple quarts the other day, matter of fact. Thanks, Ed Harris! ;)

Blackhawk
December 25, 2002, 05:20 PM
Kerosene and ATF are pretty innocuous. I'd be nervous about using anything with paint thinner in it around any finished or plastic surface, though.

Wyobuckaroo
December 25, 2002, 07:08 PM
Howdy
Ed's Red, that is the one I could not think of.
No this stuff does not do everything, but it does most things a lot cheaper. Yes I suppose prolonged exposure to some urathane finishes may not be a good idea. May not be a good idea to spill it on your white levis either. It has washed out of everything I have gotten it on so far. Leaves a pretty nasty stain on the patches I have used tho. Where do you get anhydrus lanolin? What is it's advantage? I know some people talk about using amonia in this kind of stuff, but an old chemist at Federal Cartridge told me to stay away from that in home-made compounds. I know this stuff workes good with corrosive ammo. Have used it to clean up a SKS w/ corrosive ammo and after using 8mm Turkish surplus. I am new here and still have not figured out all the knobs and switches in operating this post and my spelling always has been bad. Please bear with me.
Wyo

Dave Markowitz
December 25, 2002, 08:36 PM
Yup, that's basically the formula for Ed's Red. He specifies mineral spirits (Stoddard Solvent) rather than "paint thinner," though. The mineral spirits replace turpentine which is what was in the original Frankfort Arsenal formula.

I've used ER for several years with good results, although IME if you're shooting corrosive ammo in a non-chrome bore, it's a good idea to run a patch with something containing ammonia (e.g., Windex) through the bore to neutralize the salts.

ER is also useful around the house. It works really good on bicycle chains. :)

I normally use straight ATF to oil my guns. It's worked well and is cheap.

Jim V
December 25, 2002, 10:33 PM
For a look at Ed's formula: Ed's Red (http://www.prairienet.org/guns/use/edred.htm)

Ron L
December 25, 2002, 11:54 PM
Yeah, but it doesn't smell the same. I think my wife used to use a dab behind each ear for special occasions when we were dating. Probably why I married her. :D

Houndawg
December 26, 2002, 03:22 AM
Ed's Red also has acetone in it.

Wyobuckaroo
December 26, 2002, 11:30 AM
Howdy
Acetone is OK. Not a big advantage in this application I think. It definately has its uses. When I have used it I use it strait on a specific problem and then use something else for a longer term coating. Also have found it will melt some plastic containers and will eventually evaperate.

Anyone have any further info/experience with that lanolin mentioned earlier???????

My brother-in-law and his sons and son-in-laws have started to use this formula in there auto shop parts washers. Lot cheaper than other stuff they have used.

2 parts K1 kerosene
2 parts paint thinner
1 part Dexron III ATF

In fact I think they use used Dexron. They let it sit a while and settle out. Then when they get it mixed they strain it thru some filter paper material kind of like real heave coffee filters. They say it works good.
Wyo

Sparker
December 29, 2002, 12:31 PM
For a lubericant I use MILITEC-1. This stuff is remarkable, expensive by most standards but when you only need to use it once a year the cost is real good.

You can get it at www.militec-1.com

Ask for a sample bottle the first time and check it out for yourselves.

railroader
December 30, 2002, 12:55 AM
http://www.makarov.com/tech.html Here's another recipe at the bottom of the page. I use this in a 2 gallon bucket with a parts basket. Works for me. Mark

Archer
December 30, 2002, 03:32 PM
For a lubericant I use MILITEC-1. This stuff is remarkable, expensive by most standards but when you only need to use it once a year the cost is real good.

I would hate to have someone infer that you only need to lube a firearm "once a year" if you use Militec-1. That's absolutely not correct.

Sparker
December 30, 2002, 08:48 PM
First I only have a couple of rifles that I put more than a thousand rounds a year through, so it does take care of me for a year.

This MILITEC stuff is different than you ordinary lube. Number 1 it goes into the metal and stays there. This is why the military loves the stuff. You clean, lube, heat the metal, repeat the process a couple of times and you are done with the application, remove all excess lube that would attract dust, dirt, grains of sand, camel hair, you name it. Now you have a grease free gun that is almost a brand new gun because everything just works better than before. Putting it in the barrel will give you a couple of hundred fps increase. What other lube does that?

Reheating the metal doesn't cause it to drain out or become oily again. It became a part of the metal and cannot be removed except by removing a ten thousandth of an inch or so. I'm not a chemical engineer so I have no idea how it works, just that it works better than anything I have ever come across.


I think MILITEC guarantees the stuff for 1000 rounds, but I wouldn't have any concerns about shooting two or three thousand rounds before I became worried about metal wear to the weapon.

I know I have fell in love with it myself. I put it in all my vehicles, engines, transmissions, differentials, electric tools, electric appliances, darn near anything that moves and is made of metal.

Then on top of that I use their grease exclusively. In five years I can only say Thanks to the guy who dreamed it up.

I can tell you some amazing things that friends have told me about it if you want me to.

Pistolsmith
January 5, 2003, 03:39 PM
2 Gallons of mineral spirits (painter's thinner) or cleaning solvent
2 gallons of kerosene
1 quart Shaler's Rislone
Add your secret ingredient.
You can use a large jar of anhydrous lanolin.

Gewehr98
January 5, 2003, 10:59 PM
Sometimes used as the basis for hand lotion and salve.

It adds a measure of residual lubrication to Ed's Red once it's swabbed out of the bore. Ed Harris called it an optional component, but I've always been one to run an oiled patch through a freshly-cleaned bore before putting the gun in the safe. The lanolin, in conjunction with the ATF in the solution, does a good job of this.

Check with your local Walgreen's or favorite drugstore. They should have small containers of the stuff, "Anhydrous Lanolin, USP" Make sure it's anhydrous, meaning no water added.

Pistolsmith
January 6, 2003, 04:02 AM
Oil is for lubrication. Adding it to a bore will protect the rifling until gravity moves it to the bottom side; then the top portion oxidizes.
Ever see an old shotgun leaning in the corner of a farmhouse? You pick it up and find the stock is spongy, due to the oil migrating down by gravity. out of the receiver, drenching and softening the stock.
Since all oil is able to migrate through capillarity, it has been known to deaden primers, resulting in a dud or hangfire. The worst offenders are the aerosol oils.
Use grease, followed by a clean patch through the bore to remove surplus. I've used Vaseline to protect a pistol inside and out for periods of up to twenty years at room temperature without any problems.

MonacanMan
January 6, 2003, 06:56 AM
http://home.sprynet.com/~frfrog/homemade.htm

A page of home made cleaners and lubes, ect.

Militec is a metal conditioner. I put a light coat on after I clean and heat up the metal parts with a hair dryer. Heat causes it to bond with the metal. I reapply evertime I clean my gun. Before you use militec the first time make sure you strip off all the oils and grease from the metal. GunScrubber will do this fine. Once you apply the miltec and heat treat it so it bonds subsequent cleanings are easy. The metal is non stick. Places where I had to scrub with a brush to get the baked on dirt off before cleans off easily with a wipe down with a rag or patch. It does make the metal surfaces very slick. I love the stuff and highly recommend it.

Dave P
January 9, 2003, 05:21 PM
I use it all the time. Stottard, ATF, and kerosene only.

And I found lanolin (to keep your hands all soft) in a local health food store (homemade makeup).

But, I never add the lanolin - its not worth the hassle (it doesn't mix well). If you need soft hands, buy some hand lotion!

bountyhunter
January 10, 2003, 05:34 PM
"This MILITEC stuff is different than you ordinary lube. Number 1 it goes into the metal and stays there. This is why the military loves the stuff. You clean, lube, heat the metal, repeat the process a couple of times and you are done with the application, remove all excess lube that would attract dust, dirt, grains of sand, camel hair, you name it. Now you have a grease free gun that is almost a brand new gun because everything just works better than before. Putting it in the barrel will give you a couple of hundred fps increase. What other lube does that? "



I just started using it about a month back. It really is the best stuff around. I think Slide Glide is a close second, but Militec Grease is great and also amazingly inexpensive. You get a huge tube of it for about $8 that will last forever. The Militec liquid oil is expensive (but worth it IMO). They give big discounts to armed forces people (active or retired) up to 1/2 off. Great deal if you are one.

Stay away from home made lubes. Remember what guns cost and realize you don't want to discount the stuff that protects it from wear.

Pistolsmith
January 10, 2003, 07:46 PM
Been using my own formulas for over 30 years and none of my guns have worn out from using an inferior lube. What am I doing wrong?

Ledbetter
January 10, 2003, 09:14 PM
for cheap solvent is one part Kroil and two (or three or four) parts Mineral spirits/Stoddard Solvent.

Kroil is about $25 for a gallon, as I remember, Paint thinner about $4.

So it costs about $11 per gallon (maximum). You can mix small amounts in varying ratios.

I keep a squeeze bottle full of Stoddards Solvent/Mineral Spirits/Paint thinner (all the same thing) on the bench, so if I need to soak something I just squirt on some with a half a squirt of Kroil. Paint thinner is an excellent bore brush cleaner/soak, especially with a dash of Kroil.

4 eyed six shooter
January 11, 2003, 05:00 PM
There was a piece in the American Gunsmith for Gun cleaner as follows
Kerosene 40 % 2/5 (.40) Gal
Mineral Spirits 40% 2/5 (.40) Gal
Marvel Mystery Oil 15% 3/20 (.15) Gal
Rislone 5% 1/20 (.05) Gal

A second issue had a formula for bore cleaner @ $26.00 a Gal

3 parts Brownells Pro-Sheen to one part ammonia.

I havn't tried either, but thought that I would pass it on.

Bainx
January 15, 2003, 07:42 PM
Been using ER for about 4 years now. Works great. However, I do use Hoppes every 3rd or 4th cleaning to remove copper fouling.

Ledbetter
January 15, 2003, 09:31 PM
I wear and recommend nitrile

mechanics' gloves

for gun cleaning. You can reuse them if you're only cleaning one gun at a time. Some of the things listed in this thread are readily absorbed through the skin and highly bad for your health.

Pistolsmith
January 16, 2003, 07:11 AM
Ledbetter:
Cleaning solvent and painter's thinner will not absorb and accumulate, destroying the kidneys as liquid pyrene will. Even limited exposure to methylethyl ketone will not destroy your kidneys. The fumes will knock you out in a small enclosure, though.
I'm still here, and I've been using these ingredients with gloves and occasionally barehanded for most of my 73 years. Solvents do cause irritation of the skin for some people; they should wear neoprene gloves to prevent the problem.

Ledbetter
January 16, 2003, 02:19 PM
Glad you're still here. The posts above included reference to acetone, and most "mineral spirits" paint thinner is Stoddard Solvent, which contains traces of benzene.

My theory is, the mechanincs' gloves are readily available at the auto parts store, let's use them. Sometimes I only wear one and use that hand to handle all the solvent-y materials, using the other to hold the brush or the gun.

MAragorn
January 8, 2007, 03:28 PM
I have in the past used boiling water as a cleaner for some parts.

Soooo...it occurred to me that getting a cheap crockpot, setting it outside on the patio and heating the Ed's Red with gun parts in it might be a very good way to clean parts.

Now I know some of the components of this cheap solvent will burn, but I don't know just how possibly dangerous this might be. I don't believe the ingredients are as combustible as gasoline, for example, but I just wonder if anyone here would really know...absolutely, whether this could be done "safely".
Thanks

Plink
January 8, 2007, 04:19 PM
I can't see where heat would be of any benefit. It will evaporate off the volatiles like the mineral spirits and acetone. Acetone is highly flammable also. Heat would work good on water based cleaners, but the main reason we use solvents is that they're already aggressive and don't need heat to make them more so. You might try the crockpot idea with a solution of Simple Green and water or something similar.

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