How much of the trigger guard needs to be covered?


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Siderite
June 25, 2008, 06:48 PM
I've been looking at getting an IWB holster, this one specifically (Desantis Scorpion):
http://us.st12.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/desantisholster_2003_1185038
But I've been told to get a holster that covers the trigger guard, to prevent anything from pulling the trigger while holstered.

Is a holster like this safe, because it covers the front of the trigger? Or could this lead to a discharge in the holster?

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Glockman17366
June 26, 2008, 04:47 AM
Personally, I prefer the trigger guard fully covered. But as long as the trigger itself is covered completely (so you cannot touch the trigger when first starting to draw), it would be safe.

TAB
June 26, 2008, 04:55 AM
I like my butt, legs and feet too much to have a holster like that.

the naked prophet
June 26, 2008, 01:40 PM
I wouldn't feel comfortable with that holster. There's too much room for error that could allow something to pull the trigger while holstered. A holster should make the gun completely inert while it's holstered.

Vern Humphrey
June 26, 2008, 02:14 PM
I make my own holsters, and make them all to cover the trigger guard completely -- even for SAAs (and, believe it or not, such holsters work better -- they hold your precious Colt much more securely.)

For guns like the M1911, I add high leather, keeping the gun from contacting the body when worn IWB, and add a "button" or leather cam that holds the safety lock positively engaged.

the_fallguy
June 26, 2008, 02:31 PM
Realistically speaking, that holster is completely functional in preventing a negligent discharge while the pistol remains holstered. I would challenge anyone to discharge it while the gun is fully seated in the holster. The only danger I see is the possibility of some sort of clothing obstruction getting caught in front of the trigger during the re-holstering process. This is a remote possibility with all holsters, but it seems a little more likely with one that has such a low cut in the trigger guard area.

Jim K
June 26, 2008, 11:21 PM
Strange how much the safety nannies have influenced us. In the "old days", the best holsters exposed the trigger guard completely, and we were trained to insert the index finger before drawing. I have a flim strip somewhere showing my "draw" with the hammer halfway back on a Model 19 while the gun is coming up on the target, and dropping just as the gun lines up.

And sorry, nannies, but I still have all my toes and other pieces.

Jim

The Lone Haranguer
June 27, 2008, 09:46 PM
Were that mine, I would prefer to not see daylight between the holster lip and trigger guard opening, and the sides of the holster to come up a little tighter against the rear of the trigger guard. This will help keep your shirt tail or other objects out.

.38 Special
June 27, 2008, 09:53 PM
+1 for Jim Keenan.

This seems to be one of the "zero tolerance" issues among gunnies lately. For my money, if exposed trigger guards were as dangerous as some of the more hysterical folks would have us believe, the many companies that make them would have been sued out of existence by now.

Vern Humphrey
June 27, 2008, 09:55 PM
Were that mine, I would prefer to not see daylight between the holster lip and trigger guard opening, and the sides of the holster to come up a little tighter against the rear of the trigger guard. This will help keep your shirt tail or other objects out.

That's the key -- for guns like the Glock, accidental discharges sometimes occur when a bit of cloth is holstered along with the gun -- a high backing to the holster will prevent that.

Siderite
June 27, 2008, 10:30 PM
Thanks for all the replies! I had been vaguely uneasy before, but this helped clarify what was nagging at me.

I agree with Jim that it seems a little overblown these days, but Vern brings up a good point about having shirts possibly get in there, especially on the inside. I don't think it would make as big a difference if the inside panel covered the entire guard, with the exterior as is, because holstering is the big issue: the cover garment should be swept away, but if your undershirt bunches there, you have a problem.

As Jim's example notes, this isn't a problem with an exposed hammer, you should have your thumb on it when holstering and stop if you feel movement. With a Glock, you have no redundancy when holstering.

Srigs
June 28, 2008, 10:00 AM
So you can't get your finger or anything else on the trigger (for pocket holsters don't have anything else in that pocket). If you have that then it meets the "Covered trigger" requirement.

Geronimo45
June 28, 2008, 12:50 PM
Covered trigger guards prevent things from coming in. There are cases of people (a certain DEA agent comes to mind) who shot themselves upon reholstering, because their finger had no where to go and the gun did.
A holster with an open trigger guard reduces your chances of shooting yourself on the reholster, but increases the chances of shooting yourself on the draw.

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