Origin of 'Tyro?'


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Erik
December 25, 2002, 09:41 PM
OK, I know what it means, but not where it hails from.

Anyone?

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Jorah
December 25, 2002, 09:43 PM
Main Entry: ty┬Ěro
Pronunciation: 'tI-(")rO
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural tyros
Usage: often attributive
Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin tiro young soldier, tyro
Date: 1611

Jim V
December 25, 2002, 09:47 PM
Jorah beat me to it. The American Heritage Dictionary gave the same definition.

Preacherman
December 25, 2002, 10:01 PM
You're all wrong... comes from the early days of sail (over 4,000 years ago, if I remember correctly). The sailors didn't speak really well at that stage, language having not yet been perfected. The term "tyro" was invented as shorthand for "tie the rope", and the corresponding term "untyro" was invented to say "untie the rope". "Tyro" grew into a legendary term as captains were heard screaming at their crew, as they slowly drifted away from the dock to which they had just come alongside, "Tyro! Tyro! Tyro! TYRO, YOU BLITHERING @#$%&*!" :D :D :D

Triad
December 26, 2002, 02:53 AM
Preacherman, thanks for explaining that. I guess experience does beat book learning.:D

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