Bull barrels....why???


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Topgun
January 17, 2003, 12:56 PM
Just got to thinking. How come all the "target pistols" have bull barrels when the TOP target pistols (free pistols) have lil ol whippy thin ones? Hammerli sticks a weight on a stock extension, but the barrel is very thin.

????????????????/

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Soap
January 17, 2003, 01:03 PM
Free Pistols are not used for any form of rapid fire. So heating or stringing isn't an issue. The FP is normally built for perfect balance, this probably wouldn't be possible with a very heavy bull barrel on one.

Blueduck
January 17, 2003, 05:48 PM
Weight restriction rules I'm sure also play a role.

Kobun
January 17, 2003, 05:54 PM
The weight of a bull barrel reduces the muzzle lift, which helps when shooting fast with "serious" calibers.
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?s=&postid=43854

Bainx
January 17, 2003, 06:53 PM
I'm with Kobun on this one. My bull barrel MKII has less muzzle flip than a standard model. Also, I can run about 300 rounds thru it before it starts to feel really warm.

blades67
January 18, 2003, 07:30 PM
Because some folks think it looks cool and manufacturers will sell you what you want, even if you don't need it.

yzguy
January 19, 2003, 11:58 AM
Because some folks think it looks cool and manufacturers will sell you what you want, even if you don't need it.
I resemble that remark!!! Yeah I admit the main reason I got the bull barrel (MKII) was that I like the way it looked better, but it does take longer to heat up, and theoretically should be more steady with the added weight... I also had shot a bull barrel before and really liked it, so I wanted to get the same thing.

If no one bought pistols for looks, they would all look the same and there would be no engraving on any....

Marshall
January 19, 2003, 02:08 PM
The Heavy Bull Barrel Walls reduce vibration tremedously and improves accuravy in doing do.

Sean Smith
January 19, 2003, 02:11 PM
Free Pistols are not used for any form of rapid fire. So heating or stringing isn't an issue. The FP is normally built for perfect balance, this probably wouldn't be possible with a very heavy bull barrel on one.

Bingo. Bull barrels aren't worthless gimmicks by any stretch, but they are more suited to some applications than others.

dairycreek
January 19, 2003, 05:15 PM
They add to the stability of the rifle when aiming and significantly reduce the muzzle flip when fired. Same thing with pistols. Good shooting:)

hksw
January 19, 2003, 08:40 PM
IIRC, there is very little that is restricted in Free Pistol.

The only things covered are open sights, grips do not extend over (or support) the wrist, are only shot one cartridge at a time. (Again, IIRC, you can use semi auto but can only load it one round at a time, but could be wrong on that one.) Gun must be shot one handed, arm extended, 50 meters.

Gun dimensions, weight, trigger weight, etc. are unlimited. Certainly, there is a fine balance between gun weight and the shooters endurance to hold the gun extended for a long period of time. By using a skinny barrel, the shooter can adjust the weight of the gun to some degree without the gun getting too heavy. With a bull barrel, some, if not all, of that adjustable weight is moved to the unadjustable barrel otherwise the gun's weight would exceed the shooter's ability to hold it out extended over a long period.

P95Carry
January 19, 2003, 08:48 PM
Reduction in muzzle lift is a biggie for me . my old 686 I used for competition . had an added (home machined) steel weight . added about 8 oz ... and brought point of aim down 6"! .... aim recovery much better.

In rifles I reckon the barrel resonance factors become less marked .. and tho it is a large mass to hold heat ... probably ''buffers'' the effcts of increased temp over first lot of shots.

stevec
January 20, 2003, 04:21 AM
I also read on Dane Burn's site that the bull barrel add enough mass so that the barrel/slide assembly moves slower, delaying the barrel unlock from the slide. As a result, the bullet exits the barrel earlier in the cycle, and many people notice an accuracy improvement.

Is it true? I dunno, just passing along information.

Steve

Marko Kloos
January 20, 2003, 09:37 AM
That would only make sense with a locked breech handgun, not a fixed barrel target pistol like most .22s. The only thing moving on a Buckmark, Hammerli, or a Ruger Mk.II is the slide.

Skunkabilly
January 20, 2003, 12:02 PM
The Dawson Tactical Advantage DOES look pretty cool with that bull barrel....

stevec
January 20, 2003, 12:14 PM
lendringser,
DOH! I did not read the original question well enough.

Steve

Jim K
January 20, 2003, 12:53 PM
It's a purely personal preference, but the heavy barrels on my Ruger MkI and S&W M41 put the weight back closer to my hand. Maybe the shorter sight radius reduces apparent "wobble" and gives me more confidence, but I have tried both guns with the 7" barrel and just cannot shoot as well as with the 5".

Jim

Shmackey
January 20, 2003, 01:10 PM
There's a point of diminishing returns somewhere. I had a Ruger slabside that I finally realized was just too heavy to keep extended as long as I wanted to. One of the reasons I got a Trailside is because it's so much lighter. And I can shoot it better because of that.

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