Tumbling loaded rounds?


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ed dixon
January 19, 2003, 01:19 AM
Anybody do this after reloading to remove case lube? Just read about somebody doing just that. I'm using a single-stage press and this would be easier than wiping each case with an old t-shirt right after resizing. Opinions?

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Dan Shapiro
January 19, 2003, 02:35 AM
I do and have never had a problem in two years since I started. I seriously doubt that you would be able to hit the primer with significant enough force while tumbling. Flame away :D

clown714
January 19, 2003, 08:56 AM
lube,resize,deprime then tumble.

i have tumbled live rounds,just to clean them up.
no probs yet.

clown

bowhnter
January 19, 2003, 09:00 AM
I don't. Then again I use "One Shot" aerosol lube. leaves enough residu to not get the case stuck, but not enough to gum up the works.

oscar
January 19, 2003, 09:34 AM
I use to have some 9mm cast that were coverd with lube goo. I always tumbled them after loading to get the junk off. When I load 223 I also tumble them to get the case lube off as I load on a Dillon. I tumble in corn for only a few (15-20) minutes.

Tony Z
January 19, 2003, 09:54 AM
I have done so on occasions, as above never had a problem.

Tony z

dfrog
January 19, 2003, 10:06 AM
I throw all my finished rounds in my CV-500 for about an hour. Gets rid of any lube left on the case or bullet. Occasionally some bullets have a little flash at the parting line, tumbling smooths this out.

cobb
January 19, 2003, 10:10 AM
I use Dillon spray lube on my .223 cases when I load on my Dillon 550. So yup, I tumble no longer than an hour to get the lube off, sometimes less.

stans
January 19, 2003, 10:15 AM
:what: I don't put live rounds in my case vibrator! I have heard that it is possible for the powder inside the case to be affected. Something about the coating possibly being damaged and thus changing the burning characteristics of the powder.

WESHOOT2
January 19, 2003, 10:49 AM
NEVER tumble 158g LSWC-HP loads 'cause you'll be picking media outtathe hollowpoints for days.

Hal
January 19, 2003, 11:27 AM
Never had a real reason to do it.

Carbide dies rock. ;)

Jeeper
January 19, 2003, 01:11 PM
Tumbling is fine for loaded ammo. Powder is "tumbled" when it is made. THe "tumblers" they use are extremely fast and would make ours look like nothing. People have tumbled ammo for literally weeks to see if it affected anything and it never has. It will do nothing to loaded ammo. Factory ammo is tumbled anyway.

Peter M. Eick
January 19, 2003, 04:31 PM
I routinely tumble my 357sig rounds for 11 minutes once they are loaded to remove the lube. Why 11? I don't know it just seemed right. I only load aa9 in the 357sig and it never seems to be a problem.

Arub
January 19, 2003, 09:36 PM
I'm new to reloading, but I have a couple of friends that tumble after loading to moly coat their ammo. I was/am planning to do the same.

Gewehr98
January 19, 2003, 11:27 PM
Then it's "shaken", via the shipping and handling on the semi-trucks, etc. No danger to the powder's burn rate being modified.

If I'm making a big batch of FMJ ammo, I usually tumble the stuff for about a half hour in corncob media.

Arub, are they moly-coating the entire loaded round? That sounds an awful lot like lubricating the entire cartridge, which is NOT a good thing. (Boltface thrust, etc):eek:

Paul "Fitz" Jones
January 19, 2003, 11:29 PM
Tumbling your live ammo may not be dangerous if done for a few set minutes exactly for each batch of competition ammo but the powder particles inside of the cases, particularly the violent action of vibrator type cleaners can abrade off the coating on powder particles which changes the burning rate and pressure and can change the POINT OF IMPACT OF YOUR carefully loaded match ammo. Now who wants that?

Tumbling in corn cobs for 10 minutes exactly with a couple tablespoons of cheap paint thinner or kersone will do the job and match ammo should have every lot of components identical and every proceedure identical to always have the same point of impact with your sight picture for the life of that particular batch of ammo no matter when fired!!

So there!!

Paul Jones

Nero Steptoe
January 19, 2003, 11:33 PM
"I'm new to reloading, but I have a couple of friends that tumble after loading to moly coat their ammo. I was/am planning to do the same"


Understanding that you're new to reloading, but you're incorrect about what your friends are doing. I've moly'd thousands of bullets and I guarantee you that you don't moly 'em after they're loaded!

Arub
January 22, 2003, 11:22 PM
NS:

Thanks for the 'save'. I checked with my friends and they moly coat the bullets before loading. I appreciate your 'heads up'.

kidcoltoutlaw
January 26, 2003, 03:31 PM
i do 357 SIG only.with flat points not hp.i use bluedot it fills the case.only for 5 min.i did not a first then got to lazy to wipe the lube off.

jacks308
January 26, 2003, 04:28 PM
Several years ago I bought a small electric cement mixer just for tumbling cases . I use about four to five times the bulk of ammo in attrition milled cobs twenty minutes later it's ready to go .

Jack

Paul "Fitz" Jones
January 26, 2003, 04:42 PM
I have been a commercial reloader and the moly coating was invented for them as an excuse to not do the labor intensive sizing and lubing of bullets. Many of them now swage their bullets so they have the proper diameter before coating with moly. Home bullet casters have their bullets come out of the molds slightly "Out of Round" from the pulling of the mold halves before their bullets are completely hard. Home casters also use a variety of metals for bullets that can create different diameters when cooling depending on the antimony content and the size of the batch of lead. Moly dipping or spraying those bullets that are oversize and out of round needing sizeing to the proper diameter for your weapon creates a poor quality bullet for competition. Oversize bullets need increased pressure to move them and unless your bullets are sized they are not considered a proper quality bullet for anything but plinking. Most aerosol propellants and solvents are considered hazardous to your health and moly can be an excuse to not purchase a traditional sizer luber used by competitive shooters to make quality bullets for many decades

Now how many of you readers spray or dip then size your bullets before loading? Or spray or dip them as they come from the mold then load??

Also unless you make a large amount of an identical hardness batch of lead for casting and only make up your lead alloy from tire weights and other scrap lead in a 15 to 20 pound pot and the batches can be different compositions then the unsized bullets from each batch of lead can have different diameters??

Something to think about if you want quality bullets to win anything in competition!!

KP95DAO
January 26, 2003, 05:10 PM
All this time I figured it was just me. I knew I should have been a IDPA Master, instead of just an Expert, by now and all this time it's been those home cast, wheel weight, Lee 6 bullet mold bullets.

And I figured that those nice tight groups at 25 yards would translate over to competition. Those bullets were just shining me on. Retribution will be fearsome and quick. I am going to kick them in the *** with some hot gas.

Gewehr98
January 26, 2003, 06:01 PM
But ALL of my jacketed bullets get the moly treatment. Even the Nosler Ballistic Tips.

Nero Steptoe
January 27, 2003, 03:11 PM
I moly jacketed rifle bullets only. Tried molying a batch of jhp's for .400 Cor-Bon, turned out to be a BIG mistake. Bullets are too slick for decent neck tension and setbacks are guaranteed!

Loach
January 27, 2003, 04:23 PM
-Tumble with Walnut media
-Lube and resize
-Tumble with CornCob Media
-Trim if necessary
-Clean any remaining grit and/or corncob particles from primer pocket.
-Load 'em up!

I had heard about tumbling loaded rounds causing the powder coating to wear off or the powder breaking up into smaller pieces and affecting the burn rates. Near as I can telll, though, this is really only a problem with old powder and/or pulled surplus powders. I've never read anything about folks having trouble doing it when new(ish) powder was used. YMMV, as I've never actually tumbled a live round as the case-prep ritual above would indicate.

Paul "Fitz" Jones
January 27, 2003, 04:49 PM
It is the reloader with a vibratory brass cleaning machine cleaning lube off his loaded ammo that forgets to turn the machine off after say 5 to 10 minutes and leaves it for hours that can damage the powder granules in my humble opinion.

My main interest is in making every loaded round identical in every aspect in a large lot so that every round will have the same point of impact no matter when fired. I will admit it can be a tiny factor but the length of time that live ammo is vibrated or tumbled should also be consistent and if a batch is forgotten for an hour or more and that batch is mixed in with the lot of a thousand rounds that is being created as an identical lot, could they possibly be flyers from having a slightly different point of impact?

Create Indentical lots of a thousand Rounds
Brass of the same brand and lot numbers
Powder of the same lot numbers
Ball powder that meters more accurately
Primers Federal Or Winchester only
Bullets of the same weight and hardness
Loaded in the same conditions for the entire lot
Stored in a temperature controlled environment til taken to the range in an otherwise empty large ice chest.
A small ice chest carried and placed under your shooting position protected from direct sun rays to control its temperature.

Different temperature controls are needed for very hot summer days and very cold winter days.

Just some thoughts from an Old Competitor and Commercial Reloader

The attachment is one of my personal weapons a Smith K-38 Master piece revolver a Classic competition weapon.

Paul Jones

duncan
January 27, 2003, 06:32 PM
No problem for 15-20 minutes to knock the lube off.

Usually with rifle rounds.

Watchman
January 27, 2003, 07:54 PM
Mr. Paul "Fitz" Jones,

It looks like you ve got the procedure down for loading match grade bullets, but for pistol ? Seems like an awful lot of trouble to me. The average Joe will be lucky to shoot his pistol at 50 yards.

Most of the shooting happens at 25 or less, I cant see that the attention to detail will matter to an average shooter. I will admit my procedure is much like yours for shooting big rifles at 600 and 1000 yards where it makes a difference.

On a 25 yard bullseye, in competiton, I seen many people win with a whole lot less effort. Same goes for PPC and IDPA. Fact of the matter is most people cant shoot well enough to realize the small gains in accuracy due to the extra effort.

XxBulletBendeRXx
February 10, 2012, 08:31 PM
It is the reloader with a vibratory brass cleaning machine cleaning lube off his loaded ammo that forgets to turn the machine off after say 5 to 10 minutes and leaves it for hours that can damage the powder granules in my humble opinion.

My main interest is in making every loaded round identical in every aspect in a large lot so that every round will have the same point of impact no matter when fired. I will admit it can be a tiny factor but the length of time that live ammo is vibrated or tumbled should also be consistent and if a batch is forgotten for an hour or more and that batch is mixed in with the lot of a thousand rounds that is being created as an identical lot, could they possibly be flyers from having a slightly different point of impact?

Create Indentical lots of a thousand Rounds
Brass of the same brand and lot numbers
Powder of the same lot numbers
Ball powder that meters more accurately
Primers Federal Or Winchester only
Bullets of the same weight and hardness
Loaded in the same conditions for the entire lot
Stored in a temperature controlled environment til taken to the range in an otherwise empty large ice chest.
A small ice chest carried and placed under your shooting position protected from direct sun rays to control its temperature.

Different temperature controls are needed for very hot summer days and very cold winter days.

Just some thoughts from an Old Competitor and Commercial Reloader

The attachment is one of my personal weapons a Smith K-38 Master piece revolver a Classic competition weapon.

Paul Jones
With This logic ALL the Factory Match ammo, or just target ammo for that matter, that travels from a factory on a truck that vibrates for hundreds if not thousands of miles in back of a truck has to travel the same distance using the same speed (MPH) and use the exact lane choice so that all the bumps are the same so this simulated tumbling action can be to ensure the match ammo is all uniform and the performance, burn rate, POA etc, is affected. IMO, I think NOT.. [A simple experiment will show that driving with a bucket filled with tumbling media and brass will be polished by simply placing the media and brass in the trunk of a car or in the truck bed of a pickup. Try it put a 100 or so cases, tie it down so it wont move (to prevent any dampening) and over the course of a tank of fuel or two, you will have polished cases. The bumpier the route, the better for best results, however thats not my point...............................] To sum it up, The point is, that ammo shipped via truck, car, etc is just as much, if not more vibrated/aggitated (IE: TUMBELED ) than a few minutes or a quik clean up with live rounds in a tumbler.
One could argue that ammo being shipped is not touching each other on this journey from the factory because its boxed up for commerial sales. However there is lots of ammo that is shipped loose in a box or in ammo cans and free to move and bounce around along its journey.
I know this thread is Old however I felt like commenting and brought it back to life. My.02 cents has been spent, and IMO spent wisely.
>> B.B.

RustyFN
February 10, 2012, 08:51 PM
I tumble all of my rifle ammo after it's loaded to remove the lube.

I don't put live rounds in my case vibrator! I have heard that it is possible for the powder inside the case to be affected. Something about the coating possibly being damaged and thus changing the burning characteristics of the powder.

Internet myth.

Arkansas Paul
February 10, 2012, 10:12 PM
Wow, a 9 year old thread resurrected. That may be a new record.

rondog
February 10, 2012, 11:05 PM
Wow, a 9 year old thread resurrected. That may be a new record.

Zombie thread, rises from the dead! But I tumble my loaded rounds too, still here to tell about it. Sure makes 'em perty.

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b150/rinselman/guns/ammo%20and%20reloading/DSCN3486.jpg

blarby
February 10, 2012, 11:19 PM
Mmmmm.......puuuuurty tumbled :)

XxBulletBendeRXx
February 11, 2012, 01:27 AM
they just are on hold for a long while at times..... :p I thought this was a good topic to dig back up!! Why the Heck not!!! ? :)

Arkansas Paul
February 11, 2012, 03:11 AM
Them sure are purty rondog. I too, toss em back in for a half hour or so.

FROGO207
February 11, 2012, 07:31 AM
Those rounds now have your finger prints on them you know so you better put them back in for a while longer to get rid of them prints.:neener::D

I polish my finished ammo with a bit of Nu-Finish car polish to keep them looking like new for ever.:D

x_wrench
February 11, 2012, 09:17 AM
i just wash all my brass in hot soapy water after sizing. i tumble prior to sizing, so it works well for me.

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