supressor for .22 and .223/5.56


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Vitesse304
January 30, 2010, 03:20 PM
Anybody know if there is suppressor that can handle both?

I want to run one on my AR15 and AR-22.

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taliv
January 30, 2010, 03:35 PM
a 223/5.56 suppressor handles 22 very well

WoofersInc
January 30, 2010, 04:06 PM
You will not want to use one suppressor for both.

Most centerfire suppressors are sealed. 22LR will gunk up and foul the suppressor with lead, which will over time lessen it's performance. With it being sealed you will not be able to effectively clean it.
The other issue is weight and size. a suppressor designed for 223 will be substantialy bigger and heavier than a 22LR suppressor. Hang that off of a 22LR pistol and you will have problems.


This is a question that comes up very frequently about suppressors and the overwhelming concensous is not to do it. If I recall a lot of the manufacturers also will void warranties for doing this.

V.Oller
January 30, 2010, 10:03 PM
+1 to the above!

taliv
January 30, 2010, 10:34 PM
i have 5.56 and 22 suppressors, and granted, i wouldn't hang my 5.56 can off my walther P22 or anything like that, but i've run THOUSANDS of bulk pack 22lr through ceiner kit in suppressed ARs.

as for cleaning, i find my 5.56 suppressor needs cleaning even when i only shoot 5.56 through it. if you can effectively clean it from that, you can effectively clean it from 22lr shooting.

the way i clean my cans is to fill a short PVC pipe with kroil and drop the can in, shake it up a bit, and let it sit for a few days. (make sure you drain the kroil out completely before shooting again)


btw, which mfg voids warranty for shooting a 22lr through a 223 can?

SharpsDressedMan
January 31, 2010, 10:18 PM
Soaking in a manufacturer approved cleaner or solvent, and later blowing out with an air compressor works pretty well.

LiquidTension
February 1, 2010, 06:54 PM
I've never had to clean my .223 can. My .22 can hasn't been cleaned either, but it needs it. .22 ammo is super dirty. For me, it's not worth gunking up my .223 can for no reason. I paid $460 including tax stamp for my .22 can and it's worth every penny. The next .22 can I get will be all stainless so I can drop it in the 50/50 solution to clean the lead out. I've only put a few thousand rounds through the .22 can, but there is an obvious weight difference between it and a new one of the same model.

In short, just get 2 cans. Suppressors are just like guns - one is never enough :) And as usual, I will end my post with a link to Bryon's website because he is a great guy to deal with and has the lowest prices on cans.

www.major-malfunction.com

mrnkc130
February 2, 2010, 03:05 AM
I just used a .556 suppressor today with both, works great!

I'm no expert but as long as you can take it apart for cleaning there are no problems, .556 supressors are just heavier than a .22 only can.

Most .556 cans i have looked at dissassemble for cleaning.

WoofersInc
February 2, 2010, 03:30 PM
as for cleaning, i find my 5.56 suppressor needs cleaning even when i only shoot 5.56 through it. if you can effectively clean it from that, you can effectively clean it from 22lr shooting.

Actually you can't. The 22LR as it leaves the barrel has a small cloud of molten lead following behind it. This sticks to the baffles and hardens. None of the commercially available cleaning agents will remove this hardened lead. As more lead builds up it will over time reduce the effectiveness of the suppressor. The other risk is if you do get enough of a lead build-up, while firing 223 ammo the blast force could knock a piece of the lead loose. This will cause disturbances in the bullet flight which will reult in baffles strikes and a ruined suppressor.

Cleaning as you mentioned is fine for 223 ammo since no lead is deposited in the suppressor and all you are cleaning out is the carbon fouling.

As for the manufacturers, AAC will void if you use 22LR in a centerfire can. I haven't got the other owners manuals at this time to check them.
Gemtech doesn't say they will void the warranty but the say flat out not to shoot 22LR through their centerfire cans.

cpermd
February 2, 2010, 03:59 PM
I use an Outers FoulOut to clean my 22LR cans.

CP

LiquidTension
February 3, 2010, 02:15 AM
Most .556 cans i have looked at dissassemble for cleaning.

Huh? AAC, Gemtech, KAC, OPS Inc., SWR, Surefire - none of them make a take apart .223 can that I'm aware of. In fact, the TAC16 is the only .223 can I can think of that is made to be disassembled by the user.

Outside of a few hundred dollars to get a second can for .22, there's really no upside to using a .223 can for .22. They're bigger, heavier, and don't really work better than a dedicated .22 can. Once the fouling is added to the mix, I really can't understand wanting a .223 can to pull double duty.

Vitesse304
February 3, 2010, 05:54 PM
reason why i only want 1 can?

they make a .22 conversion for AR's that shoot .22 through the same barrel, so why not the silencer?

Also, instead of shelling out $500 for each can, if not more, and then another $400 for the stamp, I can save some money with 1 can.

But if the consensus is that it won't work, then i'll have to go with two...but I'm still hearing from both sides! Maybe I'll just have to e-mail one of the manufacturers...

waterhouse
February 3, 2010, 06:50 PM
Also, instead of shelling out $500 for each can, if not more, and then another $400 for the stamp, I can save some money with 1 can.

You will save money with only one can, that's for sure, but just to clarify the tax stamp is $200 and a lot of .22 cans cost about $300 or less. IOW, you can get a .22 can for a total of about $500.

ssgrock3
February 12, 2010, 11:30 PM
contact Bryon@maj-malfuntion.com of http://www.major-malfunction.com/

he has the absolute best value on all levels and calibers of suppresors, he will meet and beat most prices..."his words" and is damn knowledgeable about them. He spent forever answering all my questions.

Zak Smith
February 13, 2010, 02:05 AM
Drop it in an ultrasonic cleaner for 5 minutes. The worst you'll have to do is repaint it depending on the finish. As other have said, if you can afford it, get a .22LR suppressor separately: a 1x5" 3 oz suppressor on your .22 pistol is nicer than 15 oz.

Also, FWIW, I have never cleaned my original demo model 22S, tens of thousands of rounds through it. Minimal lead buildup.

mrnkc130
February 13, 2010, 02:35 AM
Huh? AAC, Gemtech, KAC, OPS Inc., SWR, Surefire - none of them make a take apart .223 can that I'm aware of. In fact, the TAC16 is the only .223 can I can think of that is made to be disassembled by the user.


I just used a friends AWC optima can about 2 weeks ago that disassembled for cleaning. I was also at my dealers house about a week ago buying a YHM phantom .556 and he showed me another brand (cant remember brand though :banghead:) that also disassembled for cleaning. They are out there if you want them.

Zak Smith
February 13, 2010, 01:39 PM
The disconnect is where you say,
Most .556 cans i have looked at dissassemble for cleaning.
There are some, but "most" are not, and for good reasons.

Conqueror
February 13, 2010, 07:08 PM
Agreed. Of 5.56 silencers in current production, I can only think of three (Tac-16, Shark, Coastal) that can be disassembled. And I wouldn't buy any of them.

mrnkc130
February 15, 2010, 01:02 AM
The disconnect is where you say,

Quote:
Most .556 cans i have looked at dissassemble for cleaning.

There are some, but "most" are not, and for good reasons

ok i guess I worded that poorly, but in my defense most I have looked at or used personally did disassemble for cleaning...My main point was there are ones the disassemble for cleaning that are made for 556, and they are not difficult to find.

farscott
February 15, 2010, 12:59 PM
the way i clean my cans is to fill a short PVC pipe with kroil and drop the can in, shake it up a bit, and let it sit for a few days. (make sure you drain the kroil out completely before shooting again)That is basically how I clean my suppressors except that I often let them soak for a week or so. I like to blow the excess Kroil out of the suppressor with an air compressor.

The only thing I would add is I do this outside. Kroil, to my nose, is headache inducing.

Dimis
February 15, 2010, 11:30 PM
Novice question (and living in Delaware pointless to boot) but why dont most 5.56/.223 cans come apart for cleaning?

is it just too difficult to get a good seal?

Zak Smith
February 15, 2010, 11:35 PM
It's unneeded.

WoofersInc
February 16, 2010, 02:23 PM
The main thing with centerfire cans not being takeapart is in the sealing between baffles. With the pressure generated by a centerfire round gasses would pass through and around any gaps between the edges of the baffles and the suppressors outer wall. This affects flow characteristics and noise reduction.

Zak Smith
February 16, 2010, 05:39 PM
The main thing with centerfire cans not being takeapart is in the sealing between baffles. With the pressure generated by a centerfire round gasses would pass through and around any gaps between the edges of the baffles and the suppressors outer wall.

Well, that's actually not too big of a deal. Note that several well-known baffle stack designs have ports in the baffles (other than the center aperture) that form a gas path from the first baffle to the last. Heck, a lot of the sealed suppressor designs don't even have full-sealed baffle cores (ie, no 100% seal between the outer circumference of each baffle and the outer tube).

Here are the main issues as I see them (ie from a manufacturer's and shooter's point of view):

* strength and weight: a screw-apart design needs more material thickness at the threads to provide the same strength as welded components; conversely, threads of the same strength will be heavier and take more space vs a welded interface

* mechanical complexity: the more things that can come loose, the more complex the system and the more potentially harmful to accuracy, repeatability, maintenance, etc.

* loosening: going along with the last point, if the end-cap loosens and the suppressor is fired a lot in this state, it can put more stress on internal components vs. a "tight" configuration: things may get physically "hammered" to failure as they smash against each other.

* likelihood of incorrect re-assembly (going along with the last point), and possible galling of threads if not maintained

-z

JTW Jr.
February 17, 2010, 09:42 PM
www.major-malfunction.com

Will have to give him a call , looks like he has good deals ( though the website design & color scheme are terrible ).

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