Non full-auto rated suppressor usage


PDA






lions
February 16, 2010, 01:12 PM
For a suppressor that is not rated for full-auto fire, what are the limits for very rapid semi-auto fire? Would doing a mag dump as fast as one could pull the trigger have any negative effects?

I remember reading somewhere:uhoh: that it is not recommended. (I can't remember where though, not exactly reliable information.)

What is taken into account for a full-auto rating? Heat, pressure, something else?

I have a Tac-65 .22lr suppressor that should be coming in any day now.:D I was hoping THR could clear this up for me. Thanks.

If you enjoyed reading about "Non full-auto rated suppressor usage" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
WoofersInc
February 16, 2010, 02:17 PM
One mag dump on that can should not have any issues. Here is a print out from Tactical Innovations on what they consider full auto usage.

3. Can I shoot my suppressor on a fully automatic firearm? (return to top)
The TAC65 is not rated for full auto fire. However, many customers have taken upon themself, based on their experience and good judgement, to use their TAC65 for full auto applications and have had good experiences shooting the TAC65 on full auto firearms. Full auto fire generates potentially damaging heat much more quickly than semiauto fire does. In order for us to rate it for full auto use, we would have a responsibility to be able to provide purchasers with data for factors such as, but not limited to: the volume of fire using different ammunition, from different barrel length firearms, running at different rates of speed, etc, combinations of which could damage the suppressor and potentially injure the shooter or bystanders. The time required to accurately generate that data is not commensurate with the demand, so we've instead elected to not rate the TAC65 as a full auto suppressor. When comparing our TAC65 to other manufacturers' suppressors that allow "limited full auto fire", be sure to demand specific damage point data. For fullauto fire, we recommend our DIAMOND all stainless steel .22LR suppressor, which is capable of am minimum of EIGHT AM180 275 round drums run back to back with no damage. For more moderate full auto shooting, we recommend our QUEST all stainless steel .22LR suppressor, that works well on both handguns and rifles and is rated for responsible full auto fire.


I have run my Gemtech Outback pretty hard and it is an all aluminum can similar to the Tac 65.

lions
February 16, 2010, 06:03 PM
How about that, from the horse's mouth. Thanks for that and your experience Woofers.

Anyone else care to hit me with some knowledge?

DoubleTapDrew
February 17, 2010, 07:54 PM
Jeez 2200 rounds on FA! Those AM180s have a very high rate of fire too.
I've shot mine pretty fast and it does get warm but they seem to dissipate heat pretty well too (with a .22lr can, haven't tried centerfire yet).
I have wondered if it loses suppression ability from the gasses of the previous shot not having time to leave before the next blasts come through.

WoofersInc
February 17, 2010, 08:32 PM
I have wondered if it loses suppression ability from the gasses of the previous shot not having time to leave before the next blasts come through.

Actually a suppressor gets quieter after the first shot. There is a thing called first round pop. It is the oxygen in the suppressor allowing for the propellent to burn. The next series of shots have the suppressor with the oxygen burned off in it, so the remaining propellent doesn't burn thus lower the sound. It is not a large difference in sound, usually only a couple of decibels but it can be noticable to some people. Some people will put a squirt of nitrogen into the suppressor right before firing to eliminate this.

This is assuming you are firing rapidly. Slow fire allows the oxygen to get back into the suppressor.

Zak Smith
February 17, 2010, 08:54 PM
We have a class 3 SOT for manufacturing silencers.

It's mainly about the change in material properties as the temperature rises. The difference between a F/A rated can and a semi-rated can primarily material, with some construction issues secondly.

Here's an example I pulled off the internet how materials can change properties with temperature
http://www.mace.manchester.ac.uk/project/research/structures/strucfire/materialInFire/Steel/FireResistantSteel/fig29.gif

The material we use to construct our F/A rated suppressors is different than the materials we use for our other (ie lightweight) ones. The design and construction is otherwise very similar.

On our bolt rifle suppressors, the DuraCoat will burn off before structural damage is done to the material.

-z

If you enjoyed reading about "Non full-auto rated suppressor usage" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!