m2 carbine


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pezo
July 18, 2010, 11:50 PM
As a curio and relic or otherwise is it possible to (legally of course) obtain an original m2 carbine? If so how many are their and what would be the cost?. These are obviosly pre-86. I'm in mich where I believe full auto has to be pre-74'. M2 still would fit the bill. Or is this sooo not possible?

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LiquidTension
July 19, 2010, 12:20 AM
Totally doable. I think they run around $7k. Definitely not my first choice for a first full auto, but hey - whatever floats your boat.

ccsniper
July 19, 2010, 01:09 AM
you just peaked my interest in an m2 carbine

Trebor
July 19, 2010, 02:28 AM
Michigan law allows any registered MG. You no longer are limited to C&R MG's only.

That said, there are plenty of M-2 Carbines around for sale. I'm not up on current pricing, but a google search should turn up some info.

gyvel
July 19, 2010, 11:58 AM
My buddy just picked up a nice one for 5K.

Jim K
July 19, 2010, 03:47 PM
There are not many actual marked M2 carbines, but there are a goodly number of M1 carbines with M2 kits installed, and there are M2 kits available for sale (transfer on a Form 4 as the kit is itself the machinegun.) The kit has the advantage that it can be put on any M1 or commercial carbine.

A problem is that many of the registered kits on the market are not GI and are not durable. The disconnector levers break and because it is usually the numbered part, the "gun" is broken.

Jim

pezo
July 19, 2010, 10:14 PM
Alright, thanks, I did a google for m2"s for sale and found impact arms. It's nice to know that these guns are available legallly to law-abiding gun enthusiest and at an average price of $7,000.00 its a deal for an NFA weapon. However if I'd drop $7,000 on any firearm my wife would have me publically hanged. I have the m1 carbine and thought it would be nice to have it's evil twin. haha. I love "old world" semi/auto military small arms. But not unless I win the lotto. (side note go to impact arms and check out that wicked american arms .22lr sub-machine gun), I would love one of those, dear god can we say fun. Thanks

mboylan
July 20, 2010, 01:02 AM
The kit guns are 6K to 8K and not very reliable. An original is better. There are still some durability issues, but it's OK to swap FCGs on and original and not on a kit. The cost can be outrageous for an original depending on the manufacturer.

LiquidTension
July 20, 2010, 08:07 AM
If you just want to get into the full auto game, I recommend a M11/9 with a Lage upper. Total cost about $4k, LOTS of fun to shoot.

Aunt Bee
July 20, 2010, 10:05 AM
5 K in my area-- Md, Va, Pa

M2 Carbine
July 20, 2010, 11:58 AM
$5,000 plus. Not bad since the conversion kit cost me about $75.:)

Given a choice, the conversion kit is the way to go. Since the parts can all be replaced when broken or worn out, the conversion kit never wears out. All the M2 parts can still be found at a reasonable price.

The Carbine is somewhat of a poor full auto. It was never designed to take the punishment given a full auto. I have a big Ziplock bag full of worn and broken Carbine parts, up to and including a cracked receiver.

When I was going to build a FA kit I had the choice of the AR, UZI or Carbine. I decided on the Carbine because I had so many M1 Carbines and the FA conversion was so cheap and easy to "build". Mostly just swapping out parts.
Actually some of the aftermarket M1 Carbine manufacturers built their Carbines with M2 slides, trigger housings, etc.

A friend shooting my M2.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/Video/th_P1010099.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/Video/?action=view&current=P1010099.flv)

pezo
July 20, 2010, 02:07 PM
Interesting to hear about the reliability issues. I think I"ll remain an m1 carbine semi-auto guy. If I were to go thru all the red tape and or cost no way. But the american arms .22lr sub-machine gun is calling my name. Better check that ticket. I don't have a soft spot for full auto in general just certain guns of historical signifigance or configurations which may or may not be be full auto capable.

gyvel
July 24, 2010, 11:43 AM
Given a choice, the conversion kit is the way to go. Since the parts can all be replaced when broken or worn out, the conversion kit never wears out. All the M2 parts can still be found at a reasonable price.

I'm not sure if that's entirely true. I was told that, if you own a registered conversion kit (i.e. the parts and not the gun itself), the part(s) that break must be returned to a Class II or Class III SOT for "repair," just the same as an NFA weapon must be returned in the case of breakage.

medalguy
July 24, 2010, 04:22 PM
Since each part is not numbered, how would you know if a given part was one of the originally registered kit parts or a replacement??

Oyeboten
July 24, 2010, 06:08 PM
Ohhhhh, Lol...

A few years ago, at the old outdoor Fleamarket here...they used to allow people to sell a few guns along with other household items and so on, so it was not unusual to see a few rifles and handguns and shotguns for sale.

Anyway, some guy had cleaned out his grandpa's garage, had all sorts of things, including three or four complete, cosmoline-gooey M2 Receivers with barrels and so on, meaning, just the rear Stock was off...and he had a box of stocks and boxes of other M1 Receivers and parts.

He said he did not know anything about them other than he thought they were WWII, and was just getting rid of stuff in general, all sorts of old Tools and Bench Grinders and whatever else.

A guy ahead of me bought all the M1 and M2 related things for like $150.00


This was 1996 I think.

I was not particularly up on the M1 or M2, but, later learned a little to where I realized that those various ones represented quite a find.


I had no idea the M2 was so valuable!


Eeeeesh!


Wish I'd been quicker off the Dime there on that, but, I did not know enough, and besides, the guy ahead of me was already making his deal.


What would one do if one did find an old M2 Receiver or complete Carbine?


I think one would have to get the BATF&E Matters arranged beforehand, for a 'transfer' to occur, yes?


So, legally, even if I had been first in line and savvy enough, the situation would have presented a Legal problem to buy them?

rcmodel
July 24, 2010, 06:20 PM
Yes!

There are way more unregistered M2 Carbines floating around then registered ones I betcha. I can think of at least one I know of right now that has been traded around this area for 40 years (among friends).

A lot of complete M2 kits came home in duffle bags after Korea & Vietnam too.

And if they were not registered before 1986, they cannot be registered now.
Without the paperwork present to prove they were legal, you would be buying a pig in a poke.

And that pig could cost you jail time.

rc

Oyeboten
July 24, 2010, 07:46 PM
Just as well things went the way they did...too much of a Sticky Wicket for me.


Still, it is intersting what things turn up now and then from people's older Garages and Attics and so on.

rcmodel
July 25, 2010, 04:19 PM
I was at a farm auction about four years ago when they sold two completely dissembled M3 Grease-Guns in an old peach basket full of junk.

I told the auctioneer what they were and that they were illegal under Federal law, and he sold them anyway! I think that peach basket brought about 500 bucks.

Apparently at least two bidders knew what they were too, and didn't care too much about the law!

rc

gyvel
July 27, 2010, 12:53 PM
Since each part is not numbered, how would you know if a given part was one of the originally registered kit parts or a replacement??

That's what I was unclear about. Which part of the conversion is considered the "machine gun?"

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