I'm new, a little help?


PDA






Azrael256
January 27, 2003, 11:13 AM
I've been shooting cartridge guns since the time I was old enough to hold grandad's .22, but this past weekend I was introduced to the world of blackpowder. I think there is some addictive chemical in gunpowder that makes me want to do it again, or maybe it's just the copious quantity of smoke and the loud BOOM. Either way, I want in.

So, where do I start? I have ample instruction comprised of several hundred years of combined experience from the friends that introduced me to this new field, so I guess my real question is what to do about a gun. I've asked them this same question, but it never hurts to have more information, so tell me where you think I should start.

If you enjoyed reading about "I'm new, a little help?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
dfariswheel
January 27, 2003, 06:46 PM
The first step is to decide WHAT you want to shoot.

Ball and patch rifle? Percussion or flint? Traditional Pennsylvania/Kentucky, Hawken, modern?

Rifled musket with Minie ball?

Revolver? Center fire cartridge or percussion?

Once you've decided what type of firearm, you can decide what type of shooting.

Plinking, formal target shooting, rendezvous meets, cowboy shooting, hunting?

Dave Markowitz
January 27, 2003, 08:53 PM
A good book for you as a new BP shooter to get it the Lyman Black Pwder Handbook and Loading Manual. Lot's of good info in there.

Welcome to the Dark Side. :)

Azrael256
January 28, 2003, 09:42 PM
frodo527, I'll go to the bookstore in the morning.

I think I want to go with a Kentucky rifle, but a friend tells me that they're typically small in caliber. I think the design of those rifles is very attractive, so maybe something with that look and a heavier caliber. I don't plan to do any real fancy shooting, probably just plinking and, when I get good at it, some hunting. A friend suggested that a .50 cal would be a nice medium that would allow me to do a lot of fun shooting, but still take down a Texas deer with relative ease. I have also been told that a few pounds of gunpowder and a few pounds of butter lead will serve me well should I ever need to rely on the rifle for a great length of time, and you sure can't beat the price of shooting a muzzleloader.

I looked at some Thompson Center rifles at a gun show the other day. They were nice, but they were percussion and they had ploymer furniture. I have heard good things about them, but those just don't suit my style. I have also talked to some friends, who go to rendezvous, about having something custom made, but I would like to try to find something out there that suits me before spending the $$$ on something custom. Where should I look for a flintlock in the Kentucky style, around a .50 that won't set me back too far (under $500 would be good)?

Mike Weber
January 29, 2003, 03:13 AM
Then here would be a good rifle and reasonably priced The Traditions Pennsylvania You can get it in either flintlock or percussion. Its a longrifle like the Kentucky It has lots of pretty brass furniture on it and its .50 Caliber. Two of my friends recently got these in flintlock. I've shot one of them and I was fairly impressed with the rifle.

4v50 Gary
January 30, 2003, 11:26 AM
Before you buy, you may want to attend a Rendezvous and see if you're interested in the fur trade era. Or attend a Civil War reenactment and see if you want percussion (smoothbore or Minie rifle). Many ways to approach this and you may do what I do - get something for every period so you can shoot with all of them.

Iggy
January 31, 2003, 11:10 PM
.

sixgun_symphony
February 2, 2003, 01:59 AM
I've been shooting cartridge guns since the time I was old enough to hold grandad's .22, but this past weekend I was introduced to the world of blackpowder.

Gotta let you know that there were blackpowder cartridge firearms. (ie. .45 Colt, .44-40, .32-20, and ect.) before smokeless powder.



Glad to see the interest in traditional muzzle-loading firearms. The Traditions Pennsylvania rifle will be a good entry level gun, but eventually you will want to move up to a custom longrifle.

A .40 calibers is optimum for target shooting, a .45 caliber is better for hunting and will take down a deer.


Muzzleloader Magazine (http://www.muzzleloadermag.com/)

If you enjoyed reading about "I'm new, a little help?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!