686 Cylinder release woes :(


PDA






Sprout
February 6, 2003, 05:57 PM
Intermittently, the cylinder on my 686+ doesn’t want to release easily. I tightened the cylinder rod as tight as it goes, and took off the side plate and cleaned things up with Breakfree CLP, but it still occasionally sticks. I’m thinking it may be the cylinder stop stud, but I don’t know. Any ideas?

Thanks

If you enjoyed reading about "686 Cylinder release woes :(" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
LeadPumper
February 7, 2003, 12:43 PM
Bought a used 686 couple of years ago that had this problem. Intermitent Cylinder non-release. Didn't matter if dry fired or at the range, every once in a while, when the cylinder stopped at one particular divet, it would stick. Ok, maybe divet isn't the correct smith term, but I'm having vaporlock right now so work with me.

After looking at all the typical problems, ejector rod, hand, side plate, etc, I had my Smith look at my Smith. Under magnification, a slight bur was visible on one cylinder divet (you know, that scaloped recess on the cylinder that fits into hand on the frame). He said to GENTLY file it down until the cylinder released smoothly.

Apparently the previous owner had snapped the cylinder shut hard on this cylinder divet (dang what is the name of that thing!). The stainless steel was fine, just burred. Crane was fine.

Works fine now.

-LeadPumper

VictorLouis
February 7, 2003, 02:58 PM
The scallop prior to the divet is call the lead. The divet is called the stop notch. The cylinder stop remains locked when you open the cylinder, so it has to roll up and over it somewhat. Sounds like the peening from your gun's prior owner caused the intermittent problem.

Revolver Armorer
February 8, 2003, 05:49 PM
Problem when folks tighten their cylinders ejector rod is that they often bend the cylinders pins. The cylinders ejector rod should never be tightened without ejector support tool or inert dummy polymer rounds to keep the ratchet from twisting (causing bent cylinder pins). Difficulty opening can come from the front of the cylinder assembly (at the locking bolt) which could be worn or not fit properly. Problems with hard opening can come from the rear of the cylinder assembly with a worn bolt. To clear things up, the "Locking Bolt" is up front and the "Bolt" at back face of the Recoil Shield. Both parts are hand fit. Just the same, hard opening is likely to be caused by these problems. But not always, and untrained hands should never attempt to fix a firearm. Let a pro go over the gun.

Sprout
February 9, 2003, 12:55 AM
Thanks for the help everybody. I'll take a good look at the lead and stop notches, and hope I didn't bend the cylinder star or ejector pin. Thanks again

Revolver Armorer
February 9, 2003, 10:23 AM
What is really funny about wheel guns is the causes of cylinder cramp and hard closure, that is, assuming that everything is in direct centerline (i.e. yoke and ejector rod) - runout tests and thimble gauging always tells the true story. Such tests always show if anything is out of centerline. Actually, the Bolt tip on the recoil shield should be perfectly level with the recoil shield. The locking bolt (up front near the barrels shrowd) should positively drop when you close the cylinder and fall into the ejector rods recessed tip. Headspace and barrel cylinder gap should be checked. Throwing and spitting lead, bad timing and action cramp can surface in a poorly maintained revolver.

Revolver Armorer
February 9, 2003, 10:34 AM
One more issue. The sideplate doesn't have any relationship with hard opening on the 686. On a Colt, yes (remember that the thumb latch is connected to the sideplate). Even lifter fitting must be done with sideplate off. But on a S&W, no. Think centerline and center, front and back locking points. A trained guy can easily fix your wheelgun. :)

yesterdaysyouth
February 9, 2003, 11:49 AM
im having a minor problem with my 29 not opening as easily as i'd like it to as well....

i took the cylinder apart and retightened the ejector rod, that wasn't the problem....

from closer inspection it looks like the locking bolt is hanging in the recess between the ejector rod and the recess in the tip, which would make me think the bolt tip wasn't getting out far enough...

the bolt tip isn't exactly flush, but it still doesn't push out the ejector pin to the point where everything will clear properly....

so what's the easiest cure?? new bolt?? do nothing??

i also took some cylinder gap measurements, smallest feeler i had was .0015 one half of the cylinder i couldn't get it in the gap the other half i could get the .002 up in there tightly.... is this strange???

bountyhunter
February 10, 2003, 03:32 PM
"i also took some cylinder gap measurements, smallest feeler i had was .0015 one half of the cylinder i couldn't get it in the gap the other half i could get the .002 up in there tightly.... is this strange???"

You likely have wear at the end of the crane tube and on the cylinder surface it rides against. That increases cylinder end shake and moves the cylinders resting position forward toward the barrel. Try pulling the cylinder rearward and checking the B/C gap. I'll wager it's more like .004" at least. This can be fixed by swaging the end of the crane tube or installing washers.

If you enjoyed reading about "686 Cylinder release woes :(" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!