Handguns with shoulder stocks


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natedog
September 24, 2004, 02:35 AM
I've heard that a pistol (like a Glock 17) with a shoulder stock has to be registered as a SBR, but is there an exemption made of C&R pistols, like this one http://huntinggearauction.com/auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=23355169 ? The seller makes no mention of NFA paperwork.

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buttrap
September 24, 2004, 06:41 AM
if the stock is a ww-2 issue stock to fit the gun its legal. if its a new repro stock its not legal. PS.. I really dont think anyone would be able to or could tell the differance unless you had the gun in the FBI lab after you stuck a bank up with it and then a non matching stock would be the least of your court issues.

1911Tuner
September 24, 2004, 12:55 PM
A range bud is a collector of military pistols with shoulder stocks.
I try to coincide my trips to the range when it's his day...The first Friday in every month. Plinkin' at steel ringers at 100 yards with a stocked Artillery Luger and a Broomhandle Mauser is just way too cool...:cool:

Hkmp5sd
September 24, 2004, 04:35 PM
Yes, specific C&R handguns with original or replica shoulder stocks are not considered NFA weapons.
It is not the policy of this Bureau to render a classification on a shoulder stock which in and of itself is not subject to the provisions of the Gun Control Act or the NFA. However, as you are aware, certain Luger and Browning Hi-Power pistols when accompanied by original shoulder stocks have been removed from the purview of the NFA.

Our Firearms Classification Panel has examined your request and it is their opinion that the above mentioned pistols equipped with currently made reproduction shoulder stocks which either duplicate or closely approximate the dimensions and configuration of the original stocks would also be primarily of interest to collectors and not likely to be used as weapons. Therefore, any Luger or Browning Hi-Power pistol which would be removed from the purview of the NFA if equipped with an original shoulder stock, would also not be subject to the NFA if equipped with a reproduction shoulder stock which either duplicates or closely approximates the dimensions and configuration of the original stock.
http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs.cmu.edu/user/wbardwel/public/nfalist/atf_letter58.txt

Of course, they can't be consistent.
The Bureau has previously determined that the Canadian Inglis No. 1 Chinese contract Browning Hi Power 9mm semiautomatic pistol accompanied by an original Canadian manufactured detachable wooden holster/shoulder stock is a "curio or relic" as defined in 27 CFR, Part 178, section 178.11. This specific pistol and shoulder stock combination has been determined to be primarily a collector's item and not likely to be used as a weapon. The combination is therefore removed from the provisions of the National Firearms Act
(NFA).

A Canadian Inglis No. 1 Chinese contract browning Hi Power 9mm semiautomatic pistol with a compatible reproduction holster/shoulder stock is still subject to all of the provisions of the NFA. Individuals desiring to acquire a reproduction holster/shoulder stock for their Canadian Inglis No. 1 must first submit and have approved ATF Form 1 "Application to Make and Register a Firearm" and pay the applicable $200 making tax.
http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs.cmu.edu/user/wbardwel/public/nfalist/atf_letter70.txt

DougCxx
September 25, 2004, 04:58 PM
Semi-related: the Beeman airgun company used to import a Hermann-Weirach air pistol, the P-1 (sold in Europe as the Hermann Weirauch HW-45). The P-1 used a grip that was modeled heavily after the Colt Gov't 45. One of the accessories available for the pistol was a non-attaching shoulder stock.

At the time (late 80's-early 90's, when I saw it), the Beeman (USA) catalog said that this stock was also legal to use for firearm pistols--because it did not actually attach directly to the gun. The stock had a recess that fit the butt of the pistol, but was only held into the stock by your shooting-hand thumb.
~

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