Ruger Single Six Cylnder Wobble


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FPrice
September 24, 2004, 04:00 PM
My dealer has a Ruger single Six, a bit worn, but otherwise in good shape. But the cylinder may be on the edge of having too much play. Anyone in New England know someone who works on these? Or should I even worry about this?

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Old Fuff
September 24, 2004, 05:41 PM
What kind of cylinder play? The solution depends on what the exact problem is.

Dave Sample
September 24, 2004, 10:21 PM
End Shake or Rortary Motion?

FPrice
September 28, 2004, 04:10 PM
It would help if I described the problem, wouldn't it? :banghead:

The gun is gone, but the problem was a rotary motion with the cylinder in full lock-up. Cock the hammer, pull the trigger, hold it back, and you could rotate the cylinder back and forth (not move it forward and back). It may have been within limits, but it was pretty darn close.

I decided that if I did get it I would plan on sending it back to the manufacturer for work. But that point is, as they say, moot now.

Thanks.

Old Fuff
September 28, 2004, 07:18 PM
Unlike Colt D.A. revolvers, holding the trigger back on a Ruger Single Action won't make any diference. The hand ("pawl" in Ruger-speak), which rotates the cylinder is mounted on the hammer, not the trigger, so once the hammer is cocked the cylinder rotates no further. The cylinder stop ("latch" in Ruger-speak) is a stamped part so the cylinder is not locked with the precision seen in some other makes. It is however, satisfactory in most instances.

4v50 Gary
September 28, 2004, 11:19 PM
If it must be worked on, why not Newport, New Hampshire? Ruger just happens to be there. You won't find any big Red Ruger Eagle but look for Pine Tree Casting. BTW, I don't think they take "drop-ins" for repairs.

The manager in Allstead Gunshop in New Hampshire use to work at Ruger. He was an assembly guy before going to the repair department and finally worked part time as an armorer instructor (Tom Gagnon).

FPrice
September 29, 2004, 08:06 AM
"The hand ("pawl" in Ruger-speak), which rotates the cylinder is mounted on the hammer, not the trigger, so once the hammer is cocked the cylinder rotates no further."

So, if I understand you correctly, you check cylinder lock-up on a Ruger when the hammer is at full-cock? Right?

Old Fuff
September 29, 2004, 08:26 AM
Actually, in this case it doesn't matter if the hammer is at rest or fully cocked. Because of the way the system is designed the cylinder latch's function is completely independent of the hammer so far as locking the cylinder is concerned. Cocking the hammer does cause the latch to be lowered so that the cylinder can rotate, and then releases it so the next chamber will be locked. Rotational movement is controled by the width of the latch vs. the width of the slot in the cylinder. However an undersized cylinder pin (common in Ruger's) can add to this rotational play.

Dave Sample
September 30, 2004, 03:24 PM
Good advice from the Ancient One. The bolt is up with the hammer down or at full cock. Unlike the 1873's that I work on most, you are stuck with a stamped out metal part that is too small to start with so replacing it will not make any difference. i don't know if Ron Power has anything to correct this or not. I have not talker to him for a couple of years. He does have some neat parts for Rugers. I just replaced all the interior parts on an 1907 Colt SA and I got a great lock up even with the cylinder notches rolled out by a bad re-finisher. Better than new now. It was a paper weight before I re-built it. The tighter the lock up is, the more accurate they are.

Dave Sample
October 1, 2004, 03:23 PM
Ron has an oversize part but I do not know if it will install in a single six. I got rid of all my Rugers when Bill Ruger betrayed us way back when. You can thank him for the 10 round magazine deal.

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