What is the absolutely safest way to DE-COCK a 1911?


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MidnightHour
October 20, 2004, 04:11 PM
I've searched the forum and I couldn't find a straight answer. The threads wer either downtalking SA pistols, recommending other pistols, etc.

I would like a straight forward answer, without giving me suggestions on other pistols/trigger-actions. What is THE safest way to de-cock a 1911? If there is a thread or link that I didn't find, please direct me to a place where I can learn this information.

Brandon

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Darkmind
October 20, 2004, 04:14 PM
Assumeing were talking about a loaded 1911.


Other than unloading it and then dry fireing it, there is no such thing as a safe way to de-cock a loaded 1911. Just my .02 cents.

FPrice
October 20, 2004, 04:16 PM
What Darkmind said.

drf
October 20, 2004, 04:19 PM
Take out magazine and eject the round in the chamber and either drop the hammer manually, or point the gun in a safe direction and pull the trigger dropping the hammer....drf

cordex
October 20, 2004, 04:26 PM
Safest way to decock a loaded 1911?

Get a tube of super-glue or good epoxy and carefully squirt it all around the firing pin. Get as much as you can around the pin so as to affix it within the channel. Next, carefully fashion a small block of material to place over the firing pin stop. Be sure to drill out a hole where the firing pin is so your block itself doesn't touch it. Superglue/epoxy this to the firing pin stop so even if the hammer falls nothing can happen. Next, submerge the entire weapon in a thick tar and while it's submerged carefully place an off-hand finger under the hammer and thumb it back with your strong hand. Carefully disengage the manual safety and press the trigger while still holding the hammer back. Very slowly let it forward a slight amount and release the trigger. Now carefully let it the rest of the way down until it catches on the half-cock notch or the hammer-block you glued to the gun.

Of course, you could always just grab the hammer with a few fingers and pull the trigger while hoping for the best.

I think I'll stick to carrying cocked and locked and only dropping the hammer on an empty chamber or when I want to fire it.

middy
October 20, 2004, 04:28 PM
If you absolutely have to drop the hammer on a live round, and I wouldn't make a habit of it, the safest way is probably to make sure your thumb is between the hammer and the firing pin when you lower the hammer. That way, if you slip, all you get is a sore thumb. Hopefully.

In reality, hardly anyone carries hammer down on a live round in a SA autoloader for just this reason. Cocked and locked is safer, as counterintuitive as that may seem.

Carlos Cabeza
October 20, 2004, 05:05 PM
DROP THE MAGAZINE OUT OF THE WEAPON !, pull the slide back to eject the live round, do it again and visually inspect there is no cartridge in the chamber, do it again and stick your little pinkie finger in the chamber to feel if there is a round chambered, then, after you are positive there is not a round in the chamber, POINT THE FIREARM IN A SAFE DIRECTION and pull the trigger.

Notice how I was screaming the first part of the lesson ? This is the part that many Darwin Awards forget to do. Oh the last part is very important too !

WT
October 20, 2004, 05:26 PM
Assuming firearm is loaded, with round in chamber, hammer back and thumb safety engaged.

1. Point firearm in safe direction.
2. Disengage thumb safety.
3. If right handed, stick left thumb between hammer and frame.
4. Pull trigger releasing hammer, then immediately take finger off trigger.
5. With thumb gently lower hammer to full rest position.

The Series 80 Colts have a firing pin safety which locks until the trigger is pulled. The Series 70 and earlier Colt models did not.

I knew some old codgers who routinely carried a Colt 1911 with the hammer down on a live round. They lived to ripe old ages.

Go to the Texas Rangers Museum in Waco and you will see 1911's without trigger guards.

FPrice
October 20, 2004, 05:30 PM
"I knew some old codgers who routinely carried a Colt 1911 with the hammer down on a live round. They lived to ripe old ages."

One of the reason they were old codgers is that they probably knew how to conceal their ADs after the fact.

Black Majik
October 20, 2004, 05:31 PM
Safest way to decock a 1911 is on an empty chamber.

Most unsafe way to decock a 1911 is on a loaded chamber.

1911Tuner
October 20, 2004, 05:38 PM
First...

It's a gun. It's NOT safe!

Second...If the chamber is hot, the hammer should be at full cock, and either readied to fire or the safety engaged. It is no less safe in condition one than in condition two.

That bein' said, proceed to...

Back in the bad ol' days when the 1911 was still Uncle Sugar's
issue sidearm, the MPs and SPs who were returning their weapons to the armory at the end of their daily/nightly tour, the clearing procedure was thus:

Drop the magazine first. Not second, not later...First.

Rack the slide twice, and visually inspect the chamber to insure that a live round didn't escape your notice.

Point the pistol at a 55-gallon drum that was about 2/3rds full of sand and pull the trigger.

Want to take a guess at how many hits a month that drum averaged?

The 1911 wasn't meant to be de-cocked...though many people have done it
successfully over the years without incident...yours truly included....but it's an inherently dangerous practice, and not recommended without dry-practice..about 500 times without losing control of the hammer should do it.
One slip, and you need to start over.

When you move on to lowering the hammer on a live round, be sure to have an adequate bullet trap to point the gun toward. A 2-foot thick stack of dry newspapers will do. Be sure and point the gun straight down into the stack, and expect that if the hammer gets away from you, the slide will
very likely break your thumb unless you employ the weak-hand pinch method.

Reach over the top of the slide with your weak hand and grasp the hammer firmly between thumb and index finger. Push the hammer past full-cock as you depress the grip safety...not AFTER. When you're confident that you truly have control of the hammer, pull the trigger and lower the hammer. Note that this method makes the stack of newspapers very difficult to point the gun straight down into, so it's highly adviseable to
perform this outdoors or in front of a suitable vertical bullet trap such as the type found on indoor ranges.

Now comes the question...

Why would you want to lower the hammer on a hot chamber? The pistol can remain cocked and locked for over 50 years without weakening the mainspring to the degree that would cause misfires. Just curious...

OF
October 20, 2004, 05:41 PM
Why would you want to lower the hammer on a hot chamber?That is the question.

- Gabe

SAMHANE
October 20, 2004, 05:48 PM
buy a SIG and you don't have to worry about a safe way of decocking it you can just hit the decock lever with no problems or fears

1911Tuner
October 20, 2004, 05:52 PM
Howdy Sam...Welcome aboard.

You said:

>buy a SIG and you don't have to worry about a safe way of decocking it you can just hit the decock lever with no problems or fears<

Got absolute faith in those decock contraptions, do ya?
:uhoh:

drf
October 20, 2004, 07:45 PM
If I were to carry a 1911 and was uneasy about cocked and locked, I would just carry it without one in the chamber...
Its not completing ready when you need it but its better than nothing...

As far as decocking a 1911, I dont think I would want the hammer against a live round in the first place...

I have a 1911 but dont carry it... I carry a SA/DA with a decocker and up until now I always felt safe decocking it....1911 Tuner, do you know something I dont? have you ever heard of an incident when a decocker acted like a trigger????????drf

Darkmind
October 20, 2004, 08:26 PM
I've seen a military baretta 92fs go off in a clearing barrel when the de-cocking lever was used.:eek:


Military version not new in box, used and used and used and used tell they fell apart then rebulit, repeat that about ten times and see what you get.

SAMHANE
October 20, 2004, 08:46 PM
I wouldn't put it to my head and decock but I have faith in the decock lever on my Sig and its always pointed away in a safe direction when I do just incase god forbid it doesn't work. But to me it's waaaay more comforting than carrying "cocked and locked" or having to thumb it down

Edward429451
October 20, 2004, 09:16 PM
I dryfire on an empty chamber to decock.

I operate the slide to cock it.

I'm not sure I've ever touched my hammer with my thumb.:D

1911Tuner
October 20, 2004, 09:57 PM
I have absoluet faith in that decocking thing as long as I also have my thumb on the hammer.

Darkmind...About a year ago, I run into this guy down at the range, instructin' his fair lady on the finer points of pistoleerin'...He says:

"Honey, this here thing is the dee-cockin' lever. All ya gotta do after ya load it is push it down and...BANG! Try as we might, we couldn't get it to do it again.

Trust'em if ya want to...I'll stand behind ya.:cool:

macavada
October 20, 2004, 11:01 PM
Anybody ever do a test and decock a sig or beretta repeatedly, and then examine the primer on the round to look for signs of any contact or light strikes? Just curious.

LynnMassGuy
October 20, 2004, 11:15 PM
I don't trust the de-cocker on any pistol. Just paranoid me I guess. If there is a hammer my finger gets in front of it. If it is striker fired I point it in a safe direction, grit my teeth, make a girly dodge ball to the head face and hope for the best.

SAMHANE
October 20, 2004, 11:58 PM
I think ur right 1911tuner decocking with thumb on the hammer just realized i do the same thing never took notice till i put a snap cap in tonight

rbernie
October 21, 2004, 12:16 AM
I don't trust the de-cocker on any pistol. Just paranoid me I guess. I do find it ironic that some of us place absolute faith and trust in a hammer safety's ability to kep the hammer from falling inadvertently, but not in a decocker's ability to keep the hammer from falling too far inadvertently. :scrutiny:

dsk
October 21, 2004, 12:29 AM
I've seen a military baretta 92fs go off in a clearing barrel when the de-cocking lever was used.

HOW is that even possible?!? When the decock lever is flipped the rear of the firing pin turns with it. And the front half is secured by the firing pin safety block. Sounds like somebody had that thing put together all wrong.

Darkmind
October 21, 2004, 12:47 AM
Sounds like somebody had that thing put together all wrong.


Thats what we were thinking when it happened. We locked it up in a pistol rack right after that. Brought it back to out armory the next morning to show the clerk. He said no its not possible, then we confrounted him about how it was put back togeather. He said no way that would happen we dont make mistakes like that. All i could think was, ya right ya BSen pice of crap.

Edward429451
October 21, 2004, 01:12 AM
I do find it ironic that some of us place absolute faith and trust in a hammer safety's ability to kep the hammer from falling inadvertently, but not in a decocker's ability to keep the hammer from falling too far inadvertently.

Decockers have always been a little unnerving for me, I always expect em to go off...and yet, I'm perfectly comfortable with cocked & locked. Go figure. That is weird. Guess its just what you're used to.

1911Tuner
October 21, 2004, 08:48 AM
Cocked and Locked with a 1911 or Browning Hi-Power is not going to allow the pistol to fire unless the trigger is pulled...assuming that there is nothing wrong within the trigger group itself. i.e. An overtweaked sear spring that doesn't keep sufficient tension on the sear or a modified half-cock notch. The 1911 especially, is filled with redundancies that allow it to be carried in this mode.

The grip safety blocks the trigger. The thumb safety blocks the sear primarily, and secondarily impedes the hammer fall in the event of a cracked sear or broken hammer hooks...assuming that it's correctly fitted.
The half-cock backs it all up in case everything breaks at once, and will catch the sear even with a full eighth-inch of the tip missing. I haven't tested the new hammers with the quarter-cock shelf and broken sear yet.
but the full, captive half-cock will arrest the hammer and prevent it from reaching the firing pin.


Pistols with the passive firing pin blocking mechanisms...such as the Colt
Series 80s and Series 2 Kimbers do NOT make the guns more "safe" to carry cocked and locked as some mistakenly believe. These systems only
make the gun more drop-safe.

Decockers rarely fail, but rarely doesn't mean never. If the hammer falls with full force, there is always a chance that something could go wrong.

Trusting any mechanical safety completely isn't wise, as any mechanical device is subject to failure. The real "safety" is between your ears.

Ya'll be careful! That pistol ain't a toy and it sure ain't your friend. As I have said before..."It's as dangerous as a Rattlesnake. Regard it as hostile at all times."

Andrew Wyatt
October 21, 2004, 01:40 PM
Why would you want to lower the hammer on a hot chamber?

You have to carry in an open topped holster in dusty conditions and you don't want to go full auto because you got some junk in the FP channel.

You want to put the gun in a pouch or bag for some reason.

You have to pocket carry.

PinnedAndRecessed
October 21, 2004, 02:02 PM
In the movies they grab the hammer with the index finger and thumb of the off hand and lower it slowly. And we all know how accurate and reliable Hollywood is when it comes to guns.

Seriously, if you want to safely lower a 1911 onto a live round...........
get a Sig!

WT
October 21, 2004, 02:05 PM
Andrew - exactly!

1911Tuner
October 21, 2004, 02:58 PM
Quote:

You have to carry in an open topped holster in dusty conditions and you don't want to go full auto because you got some junk in the FP channel.


:scrutiny: ......................... :confused:
__________________________

Quote:

You want to put the gun in a pouch or bag for some reason.


:scrutiny: ...................... :confused:
_______________________

Quote:

You have to pocket carry.

:what: A 1911 in a pocket???

:D

cslinger
October 21, 2004, 03:01 PM
:what: A 1911 in a pocket???..........................or are ya just happy to see me.

Sorry I couldn't resist.

Chris

Carlos Cabeza
October 21, 2004, 06:01 PM
My current GF is all too familiar with that "decocker thingie" :scrutiny: I took her to the range with her Ruger P series somethin' er 'nother and she did really well until time to go. I said "after this mag we need to leave". Instead of emptying the magazine she wheels around off the line and with the muzzle pointed at what looked to be my head she hit the "decocker thingie" :fire: I went down to the ground when she started around but that noise is one that makes you cringe. I rippped into her a$$ "DON'T EVER FORKING DO THAT AGAIN !" I think she might not call back. :rolleyes: Really, she apologized and we are trying to educate her about the "safety between the ears". She might make it, but I'm just guessin' :D

Dave Sample
October 21, 2004, 06:26 PM
There is a very easy way. Drop the magazine and jack the slide back and get the loaded round out of the chamber. Examine the chamber to make sure it's empty, point it at Tuner's 55 Gallon drum full of sand, and then drop the hammer with the trigger. If you don't have that drum, point it at something you won't hurt by shooting it. Guns are safe. People are dangerous.

gharsh
October 21, 2004, 10:31 PM
It's funny this topic has come up. I took a concealed carry class a few weeks ago and we were shooting at targets and the instructor wanted everyone to decock their pistols. I was using my 1911 and I didn't do anything. The RO behind me told me to decock and I told him this thing does not decock. He said yes it does and thought that the safety was a decocker. I told him that the pistol was a 1911 and he said OH. Well, the instructor insisted that I decock so I carefully brought the hammer down to the half cock notch. Now I was using a Springfield that I had replaced the hammer with a Chip McCormick. I told the instructor that the half cock notch of a Springfield will not capture the hammer, it will drop when the trigger is pulled. I personally don't know if it is with enough strength to fire the gun, but I'm not going to find out.

There was another person there with a 1911 but he was at the other end of the firing line, so I didn't see what he did. Made me very nervous. The instructors response 1. You wouldn't had a cocked gun to a police officer if you had to and 2. He didn't want anyone leaving his class not knowing how to decock their guns.

Other than this incident, I thought the class was very well done. I'm actually going to an advanced pistol class from the same group this weekend. Although, I think the instructor will be different.

carpettbaggerr
October 22, 2004, 12:36 PM
You wouldn't had a cocked gun to a police officer if you had to I wouldn't hand a cocked gun to a cop [or anyone else for that matter], I'd clear the weapon first. He did teach you to clear a firearm before you hand it to anyone, didn't he?

Mute
October 22, 2004, 12:39 PM
If conditions are really so dirty that you'd be tempted to carry with an uncocked hammer, you might as well carry condition 3. I don't see any real advantage to using condition 2 over condition 3.

One handed cocking? Hope you have big hands and don't need that gun really quick.

FPrice
October 22, 2004, 12:48 PM
"You have to carry in an open topped holster in dusty conditions and you don't want to go full auto because you got some junk in the FP channel."

I am not a gunsmith, nor do I play one on TV or the internet, but this sounds wrong to me.

IIRC a semi-auto going full-auto is more related usually to a sear problem, usaully a worn or broken sear, rather than dirt in the firing pin channel. The dirt would tend to slow down the firing pin, and interrupt the firing sequence rather than cause a full-auto busrt, wouldn't it?

Andrew Wyatt
October 22, 2004, 01:20 PM
I've seen 1911s go full auto because they've gotten their firing pins wedged forward because of gunk in the firing pin channel, and several squared away fellows in my shooting group carry in condition two under those conditions.


another fellow in my shooting group carries a lightweight commander, and works at a job where he wears coveralls. when he goes to lunch, instead of chainging clothes, he puts his commander in condition two in the very large back pocket and goes about his business. WOuld you rather he left it at the shop? His coworkers don't know he carries, and going from condition 1 to condition 3 makes an awful lot of noise.



My field gear is a set of tactical tailor chest webbing. it has no holster on it, and when i 'm carrying a pack, i cannot wear my pistol belt because the pack belt interferes.

I put the 1911 in a SAW pouch, because I might need it.


when i decock a 1911, I:


1. place thumb of right hand (i'm left handed) pad down over the firing pin.

2. hold hammer firmly on both sides with my index finger and thumb of other hand.

3. making sure to point pistol in a safe direction, i pull the trigger, slowly letting the hammer fall, moving the thumb slowly out of the way once the hammer hits it.


Before you flip out, I'm not saying that condition 2 is the end all or be all of 1911 carry. I'm saying that it has a purpose in limited circumstances.

mmike87
October 22, 2004, 01:31 PM
>>> buy a SIG and you don't have to worry about a safe way of decocking it you can just hit the decock lever with no problems or fears

The poster was very specific in stating that he didn't want alternate gun suggestions.

Back to the posters question, decocking on a live round is frowned upon, to say the least. But I think you already know that. :)

If you insist on doing this, PLEASE be sure the gun is pointed in a safe direction above all else, because what you are doing is an inherently unsafe practice.

Flynt
October 22, 2004, 02:11 PM
One of the guys responding here noted that he always cocked his 1911 with the slide. I've only owned 1911's for a couple of years, and I guess you'd say I'm "self taught" when it comes to operating them. I load them by cocking the hammer with my thumb and then racking the slide. It sure is a lot easier that way. Also, I have one gun, a Colt Series 80, that has a red dot scope mounted with a grip mount. It's really hard for me to get a purchase on the slide with that configuration.

Am I doing something that's unsafe or otherwise undesirable? (I don't try decock; I'm just talking about chambering a round by cocking the hammer with my thumb.) Thanks.

Onmilo
October 22, 2004, 04:03 PM
If you have a 1911 with a Commander type hammer, that's the one with a hole through the center then insert a piece of 2 inch long wooden dowel or hard,solid plasic rod through the hole.
Take the pistol in a standard shooting hold.
With the muzzle pointed into a SAFE location,
disengage the thumb safety.
Grasp the plastic or wooden rod between the index and middle fingers of your non-shooting hand and draw the hammer slightly back.
Depress the trigger with your shooting hand index finger while controlling the hammer with your other hands finger grasp.
Ease the hammer down.
This is the safest way to decock a 1911 over a live round.
If you have a 1911 with the old spur type hammer, the safest way to decock it over a live round is to give the pistol to somebody else,
Retreat to a known safe location.
Let them do it!
I disclaim all liability in the event of accidents.

SAWBONES
October 22, 2004, 04:27 PM
And why would one reasonably wish or need to "de-cock" a loaded 1911?

nitesite
October 22, 2004, 09:06 PM
Quote:

"If you have a 1911 with the old spur type hammer, the safest way to decock it over a live round is to give the pistol to somebody else,
Retreat to a known safe location.
Let them do it!"

HYSTERICAL .... I almost ralphed my supper on that one!!!!!
:D :D :D :D

Dave Sample
October 23, 2004, 06:03 PM
I agree with Sawbones. I can see no reason for doing this to a 1911. It is either ready to rock and roll or it's empty with no magazine in it and an empty chamber with the hammer down.

Edward429451
October 23, 2004, 07:13 PM
I load them by cocking the hammer with my thumb and then racking the slide. It sure is a lot easier that way.

Uh, I'll give you the laymans version, and hopefully someone like Tuner or Fuff will chime in with the real specifics and reasons.

When the slide cycles to cock the hammer, the disconnect, and sear disengage from the hammer hooks (Eh?) and it cocks the way it was meant to operate.

When you thumb the hammer back, it drags the hammer across the sear, thus putting more stresses and potential damage to the delicate parts and is harder on your parts than it needs to be. It may or may not be a huge deal to stock parts but on a gun with a trigger job it wreaks havoc.

More or less. I aint no gunsmith, but my understanding is that it is bad so I don't do it anymore. I've probably mucked up the details of the mechanics, and hopefully someone will set me & you right on the subject with professional grade information rather than my layman stab at it! Long story short, its hard on the gun.

Edited to add" Or Dave! Sorry Dave.

DMF
October 23, 2004, 07:56 PM
With respect to the original question Mr. Sample's answer works for me, I can see no reason for doing this to a 1911. It is either ready to rock and roll or it's empty with no magazine in it and an empty chamber with the hammer down.
With regard to faith in decockers: Got absolute faith in those decock contraptions, do ya?Tuner I don't have absolute faith in anything other than there is a God, and my Mom loves me unconditionally. Everything else is degrees of faith.

That said, my degree of faith in my Sigs' decockers is very high, knowing how the thing works. However, the possibility of a problem exists, and any decocking is done with the weapon pointed in a safe direction; ie, down range, a clearing barrel, or at my vest hung over a chair. The same is true whenever manipulating the weapon for loading and unloading. Doesn't cost me anything to do it that way, other than a few extra seconds to be sure I'm doing it safe.

I can explain to my boss why I ruined a panel on my body armor, or we need to replace the clearing barrel, and I won't be in any trouble. However, forget trouble, I couldn't live with myself if a ND resulted in someone being injured or killed, whether it's decocking my Sig or loading up my 1911.

The procedures you outlined from your military days is great, but in answer to your question about how many rounds that barrel took each month I'm guessing it was some number greater than zero. People rush, take shortcuts, etc. and NDs result.

Stay safe folks. There are risks in life, and they can't be completely avoided, but loading/unloading and making your weapon safe to holster/carry is one area where the risks can be greatly minimized.

fastbolt
October 23, 2004, 08:00 PM
What is the absolutely safest way to DE-COCK a 1911?

"Absolutely safest", huh?

Okay, I'll bite.

While pointing the weapon in a safe direction, with your finger off the trigger and outside of the trigger guard ...

Remove the magazine ...

Carefully lower/disengage the thumb safety ...

Manually retract the slide and empty the chambered round, visually inspecting the chamber, and then manually cycle the slide a couple more times to make sure no live ammunition remains in the weapon ...

Lower the hammer on an empty chamber ...

:scrutiny:

Edward429451
October 23, 2004, 09:00 PM
The RO behind me told me to decock and I told him this thing does not decock. He said yes it does and thought that the safety was a decocker. I told him that the pistol was a 1911 and he said OH. Well, the instructor insisted that I decock so I carefully brought the hammer down to the half cock notch. Now I was using a Springfield that I had replaced the hammer with a Chip McCormick. I told the instructor that the half cock notch of a Springfield will not capture the hammer, it will drop when the trigger is pulled. I personally don't know if it is with enough strength to fire the gun, but I'm not going to find out.

You're talking about how the series 80 will drop the hammer from the so called half cock notch (which isn't a true half cock as on previous models) to full down when the trigger is pulled? It wont fire. I tried it a bunch of tomes along time ago when I first got mine and me & my dad noticed that it'd do this, and he tried to tell me that it was broke. It isn't a decocker and its not a half cock. I heard Tuner speak on it before, but forget the details of what was said. Maybe he'll come in and refresh our memories on this.

I wouldn't trust it to not fire, but it wont unless the pistol has problems with it.

Dave Sample
October 24, 2004, 04:30 PM
The Hammers in an '80 series Colt 1911 have a "Safety Shelf" instead of the old tried and true 1/2 cock notch. They are almost touching the firing pin at this postion, but I would not trust anything about this system. I do not distrust de-cocking type guns, I just do not own many. I have an FEG 9X18 that has something like that, but it seems safe to me. After 50+ years with 1911's, I admit I am biased. They are all I will ever want or need!

MisterG
October 25, 2004, 01:34 AM
I haven't read all of the responses, I'm sure by now they've all pretty much said that you shouldn't decock a 1911. I"m going to share a personal story about when I tried to decock a Star BM which is I believe in principle the same as trying to decock a 1911. It was earlier this year and I went to go shooting at an outdoor range. I loaded my weapon and as I have done many many times before, I depressed the trigger while lowering the hammer with my thumb. This time however my thumb slipped and the gun went off. For a moment I wasn't even sure what had happened. I was talking to a person while doing this, I probably wasn't paying enough attention of being patient enough while doing this but regardless, it happened. The guy with me asked if the gun had just gone off and I could only say "yeah". My father had been standning there with us but luckily he had walked off. It's good he did because looking at the gun in my hand and where it was pointed, I don't doubt that I would have shot him. I had to sit down and get my mind clear. It was a very shocking thing to have happen. It really tought me a lesson and almost proved fatal. Since I've decided not to lower the hammer on 1911s and 1911 style guns. I never became comfortable with that gun and sold it but I still have my Smith 1911 and I leave it cocked and locked at all times. I understand it's uncomfortable to carry a gun cocked. It just feels dangerous. But when you consider all that has to happen to have an AD on a properly cocked and locked 1911 versus trying to lower the hammer manually, as I was doing, it's easy to see which is safer. Be safe.

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