remington ammo = junk


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tango3065
November 15, 2004, 11:03 PM
I lost a nice deer due to cheep ass corelokts today, pulled the trigger and gun went snap. Just as I was about to wrap my new ruger around a tree I decided to look at the cartridge, good thing I didnt hit that tree. The primer on the cartridge was setting way to far in. The primer was just barely struck by the firing pin. Guys I have been a Remington fan for years but never again will I buy their cheap shells for anything serious like hunting.

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Mulliga
November 15, 2004, 11:15 PM
...but this can happen with any ammo. I've shot several boxes of the Core-Lokts and they seemed fine. Perhaps a particular lot was bad?

tango3065
November 15, 2004, 11:34 PM
Yes could happen to any brand but I lost a nice buck. My faith in remington is forever gone.

g56
November 16, 2004, 12:08 AM
That's about the best reason to get into handloading that I can think of! :)

dakotasin
November 16, 2004, 12:41 AM
for the life of me, i can't understand why anybody who is serious about deer hunting uses factory ammo...

to ensure quality ammo, roll your own...

swingset
November 16, 2004, 01:57 AM
Just as I was about to wrap my new ruger around a tree I decided to look at the cartridge, good thing I didnt hit that tree. The primer on the cartridge was setting way to far in. The primer was just barely struck by the firing pin.

So, let me understand this....you only looked at your ammo after a malfunction, in the field, spoiling a hunt, correct?

I suppose there's a good reason you don't inspect the cartridge you hope to take your game with, but damn if I can come up with one. It's probably best to blame the ammo, tho.

chevrofreak
November 16, 2004, 02:31 AM
At a range day a local gun store used to put on, they were sighting in a Savage 10FP LE something or other with remington ammo and one of the rounds actually imprinted its headstamp onto the bolt face. The Remington rep happened to be standing right there when it happened.

Lets just say, that rifle now belongs to Remington. (I got to put 20 rounds through it first :p)

BigG
November 16, 2004, 09:46 AM
Of the few misfires I have had, I've seen more R-P bad than any other brand. QC is poor, imho.

MrMurphy
November 16, 2004, 09:48 AM
Guess it never occured to you to inspect your ammo prior to loading?


2,000 .45 ACP Remington UMC FMJs later, I've had no problems in my Glock.
However, the hard primers on Winchester White Box don't agree with my Glock.


My .30-30 liked Core-Lokts just fine.

Pumpkinheaver
November 16, 2004, 11:20 AM
I had a similar thing happen to me. I tried to shoot one of the biggest deer I have ever seen and was foiled by a dud round of remington ammo. I havn't bought any of their ammo in years and probably never will. I use mostly handloaded ammo these days, but if I need a box of factory stuff it's usually winchester of federal premium ammo.

jimmyp50
November 16, 2004, 12:34 PM
I have killed a number of deer with Remington 150 grain PSP, 180 grain soft points in a Remington Mdl 7 .308 when younger. I never had a problem with them going off. I did shoot a small doe at 140 yds if I remember correctly, the 180 round softpoint did not work well on the small doe. Now older and more educated I use 165 grain and 130 grain WW powerpoints in my 30-06 and 270. If I was going to Texas on an expensive hunt I guess I would buy some expensive ammunition. I also want to get into reloading right after I grow an extra set of hands and add 8 more hours to the day. Right now its just the wife, kids, work, hunt when possible. jimmyp

rbernie
November 16, 2004, 01:38 PM
I use Rem 150gr 7x57 almost exclusively for my Chilean Mauser - the Mauser likes it best (sub-MOA groupings), and it's never let me down. I've shot hundreds and hundreds of this round thru this Mauser with no issues whatsoever. In fact, last Saturday AM this combo took a nice fallow doe that was dropped where she stood, DRT.

This is clearly a case of YMMV. But I'd not be one to advise throwing the baby out with the bathwater because Remington's QC wasn't PERFECT (nobody's is) and because you failed to perform a pre-hunt equipment check.

Black Snowman
November 16, 2004, 01:46 PM
It would be nice if the round had been inspected before. The priming equipment they used may seat to a depth not to a pressure (indicating full seating) which would have resulted in no differance in appearance in the ammo but would have absorbed almost all of the impact of the firing pin as the primer sat deeper.

The most likely cause is that a large pistol primer got mixed in with the large rifle primers. They are slightly shorter and would have resulted in the condition described. It's still possible that the ammo appeared fine. A deep primer is something I would notice just openning the box and looking at the rounds still in the packaging so I'm guess it wasn't seated deep but the wrong size primer.

For those who don't reload, large rifle primers and large pistol primers are the same diameter but the rifle primers are slightly longer.

I've had good experiance with Remington bullets, but poor experiance with their brass and loaded ammunition. I haven't used their primers.

rick_reno
November 16, 2004, 02:58 PM
I lost a nice deer due to cheep ass corelokts today, pulled the trigger and gun went snap. Just as I was about to wrap my new ruger around a tree I decided to look at the cartridge, good thing I didnt hit that tree. The primer on the cartridge was setting way to far in. The primer was just barely struck by the firing pin. Guys I have been a Remington fan for years but never again will I buy their cheap shells for anything serious like hunting.

I'm curious what "way to far in" is? Do you have a mic you can measure the depth with? To eliminate the rifle (you said it was a Ruger) do you have access to another rifle you can try this round in? Do other rounds in that box also have their primers seated deep?

litman252
November 16, 2004, 07:57 PM
One stupid little thing that always bugged me about Rem ammo was that there cases always look like crap when compared to any other brand.
If they don't care about the outside, do they care about the inside???
PTP
Tony

g_gunter
November 16, 2004, 08:14 PM
My experience with Remington Core-Lokt ammo for my 30-30 is that it is not always consistent. The latest example today was firing my 30-30 at 50 yds. making sure my scope was ready for deer season and had 3 flyers out of 17 at about 3 inches above and to the left of where the rest were impacting (they weren't grouped - true flyers). The rest grouped fine. In my opinion, that's pretty bad at 50 yards using a scope since it will only be more exaggerated at 100-150 yds.

On the other hand, I've never had a problem with Winchester. Go figure?

g_gunter

rbernie
November 16, 2004, 08:34 PM
Each rifle will have a preferred diet. For example, my 7x57 loves the Remington factory stuff and tolerates the S&B fodder, but hates the PMC and Winchester stuff. So long as they all go BOOM, I figure that one of my responsibilities is to find out what my rifle likes and doesn't like. It sounds as if you're doing just that.

But I certainly don't consider PMC to be crap because my 7x57 doesn't like it. Especially because my 303 prefers the PMC stuff over the Rem and Win and PMP loads. :)

lycanthrope
November 16, 2004, 09:17 PM
Even if you handload you need to check your primer depth. Equipment and ammo failures happen. Check and doublecheck.

nipprdog
November 16, 2004, 09:21 PM
.

RaySendero
November 16, 2004, 10:03 PM
mastinson,

Sorry to hear about your lost deer. I see a lot of Remington CoreLokt ammo at the range this time of year - New rifles, last minute sight-ins, cheap pratice, etc. I've never seen anyone have a misfire so I don't believe they are that common. Also know 2 gunsmiths in the area that prefer to use CoreLokts when someone brings in an "accuracy problem". I myself have used them some time ago with a 30/06 - many deer and no misfires.

Don't use them any more as I prefer to reload. But I do reload the bulk priced CoreLokt bullets for low cost practice and they are very accurate. From my 270, they will print close to match bullets out to around 250 yards! They are a great close-in (or youth) deer round with the 130s loaded down to about 2700fps.

Ky Thunder
November 16, 2004, 10:18 PM
Mastinson,i've had duds and squib loads with Remington 22's,the UMC .40's and Remington shotshells.Their Q.C.isn't up to par,and hasn't been in years.I don't use Remington ammo anymore either.

Steve Smith
November 16, 2004, 11:21 PM
It sounds like your faith in Remington would have remained unchecked if it had happened at the range, so why is it different when there is a "nice buck" in front of you?

Everyone, from handloaders to primer manufacturers, to bullet makers, to case manufaturers to complete ammunition manufacturers can have a bad round come out. If you think of the MILLIONS that they produce every year, surely they will have a few that are duds. It is inevitible. It was purely coincidence that you found one at an inopprtune time.

Either:
1. Accept that you had an unlucky draw and press on with Remington.

or

2. Choose to accept all responsibility for future failures by making your own ammo.

MagnumCaliber357
November 16, 2004, 11:39 PM
i suggest writting a nice and long complaint to Remington describing th situation and how you werent able to bring home the bacon and very disappointed as a loyal customer and mabey thell send you some free ???? :evil:

sry free stuff....stuff :banghead:

taliv
November 17, 2004, 12:54 AM
i'm somewhat skeptical. seating the primer farther in typically causes the primers to be MORE sensitive to hammer strikes, not LESS.

Also, I'm pretty sure most hammers extend far enough from the face of the bolt to ignite primers no matter how deep (within reason) you set them.

Finally, remington primers are the softest I'm aware of (softer than CCI and Winchester). I have a few guns that don't cotton to CCI primers. I have to let the hammer down the fun way on them 2 or 3 times before they go boom. So I use a lot of remington primers.


i'll grant you that corlokt (however you spell it) is the suck. out of my rem700 .308 from a bench, corelokt keeps 6" groups, while my handloads (sierra matchkings) are same hole.

but who knows? as was mentioned previously, stranger things have happened.

SMLE
November 17, 2004, 05:22 AM
Since all my rifles are mil-surps I haven't shot hardly any Remington rifle ammo, but I carry Remington Golden Sabers in every handgun I own. I found an incredible deal on 165grn GS in 40 S&W and bought 800 rounds. I have gone through over half of them without the slightest problem. I haven't fired as many .38s, .357s or 45s, as I don't currently use those guns for CCW, but have yet to have any issues.

My $0.02, YMMV

Master Blaster
November 17, 2004, 08:59 AM
You probably have never seen a primer that was hit by the firing pin and did not ignite the shell before, thats why the primer appears to have a light hit compared to shells that went off. My guess is that the primer cup was missing the priming pellet, and the anvil. A dud, I dont shoot remington ammo because of inconsistency I noted with their .22lr rounds, and with their handgun stuff, I have seen glocks choke on their factory defensive ammo (golden sabers), and I have never seen one choke on my handloads, or on other factory ammo form federal and winchester.

If you want truely flawless hunting ammo get good new brass, federal match primers, and a good reloading manual and learn to handload. You can have 100% QC that way by carefully choosing the appropriate bullet.

BTW I have reloaded remington brass and never had any problem with it, in .45 ACP 9mm .32acp or in 30.06.

dakotasin
November 17, 2004, 10:50 AM
i'm somewhat skeptical. seating the primer farther in typically causes the primers to be MORE sensitive to hammer strikes, not LESS.

Also, I'm pretty sure most hammers extend far enough from the face of the bolt to ignite primers no matter how deep (within reason) you set them.



taliv makes a lot of sense here... i had a non-fire at an antelope buck this year w/ my handloads. further inspection revealed that the firing pin got hung up in the bolt. i cleaned the bolt out, reassembled everything, and went out and dropped the hammer on the buck later, using the cartridge that had failed to fire earlier.

i know you said you are sure it is the ammo and not the gun, but don't be too quick to rule out the gun. it does happen, and it doesn't take much debris in the bolt to make it happen.

Kermit911
November 17, 2004, 10:55 AM
I've never had a problem with remington.

WYO
November 17, 2004, 11:12 AM
The only malfunction I have ever had with factory ammo was a gun problem with a BLR, not an ammo problem. The firing pin was not hitting the primer hard enough. A trip to the gunsmith and the problem was solved. Core-Lokts have a decent reputation, and I've used a lot of them. The chief complaint on Core Lokts that I see on forums involves an apparent redesign of the jacket a few (several?) years ago.

lycanthrope
November 17, 2004, 11:35 AM
I've seen debris clog a firing pin hole enough to cause a failure and have seen primers that haven't been seated fully and they are simply pushed into the pocket by the fp strike.

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