Automated hunting over the Web???


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Preacherman
November 16, 2004, 11:30 PM
From CNN (http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/11/16/life.hunting.reut/index.html):

That moose may soon be just a mouse click away

Internet hunting idea has wildlife officials up in arms

Tuesday, November 16, 2004 Posted: 10:48 PM EST (0348 GMT)

HOUSTON, Texas (Reuters) -- Hunters soon may be able to sit at their computers and blast away at animals on a Texas ranch via the Internet, a prospect that has state wildlife officials up in arms.

The Web site already offers target practice with a .22 caliber rifle and could soon let hunters shoot at deer, antelope and wild pigs, site creator John Underwood said on Tuesday.

Texas officials are not quite sure what to make of Underwood's Web site, but may tweak existing laws to make sure Internet hunting does not get out of hand.

"This is the first one I've seen," said Texas Parks and Wildlife Department wildlife director Mike Berger. "The current state statutes don't cover this sort of thing."

Underwood, an estimator for a San Antonio, Texas auto body shop, has invested $10,000 to build a platform for a rifle and camera that can be remotely aimed on his 330-acre (133-hectare) southwest Texas ranch by anyone on the Internet anywhere in the world.

The idea came last year while viewing another Web site on which cameras posted in the wild are used to snap photos of animals.

"We were looking at a beautiful white-tail buck and my friend said 'If you just had a gun for that.' A little light bulb went off in my head," he said.

Internet hunting could be popular with disabled hunters unable to get out in the woods or distant hunters who cannot afford a trip to Texas, Underwood said.

Berger said state law only covers "regulated animals" such as native deer and birds and cannot prevent Underwood from offering Internet hunts of "unregulated" animals such as non-native deer that many ranchers have imported and wild pigs.

He has proposed a rule that will come up for public discussion in January that anyone hunting animals covered by state law must be physically on site when they shoot.

Berger expressed reservations about remote control hunting, but noted that humans have always adopted new technologies to hunt.

"First it was rocks and clubs, then we sharpened it and put it on a stick. Then there was the bow and arrow, black powder, smokeless power and optics," Berger said. "Maybe this is the next technological step out there."

Underwood, 39, said he will offer animal hunting as soon as he gets a fast Internet connection to his remote ranch that will enable hunters to aim the rifle quickly at passing animals.

He said an attendant would retrieve shot animals for the shooters, who could have the heads preserved by a taxidermist. They could also have the meat processed and shipped home, or donated to animal orphanages.

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Matt1911
November 17, 2004, 07:10 AM
:what:

rick_reno
November 17, 2004, 11:51 AM
I'm watching for one of the cash strapped zoos to pick up on this cash cow. They could auction off rare species "hunts" on EBay.

cordex
November 17, 2004, 12:04 PM
Remote control target practice might be fun. Remote control hunts not so much.

Chuck Jennings
November 17, 2004, 12:05 PM
This concept could be a great boon to the home security market! :D

Matt G
November 17, 2004, 12:07 PM
This has nothing whatever to do with hunting. Killing? Sure. But not hunting. As a hunter who has been in the field many seasons for many species over more than two decades, I am disgusted by this, and will support legislation against it.

Some disabled folk can't get into the field? I feel bad for 'em, I really do. But this isn't the way. We are sportsmen, and having some machine sit on stand and squeeze the trigger and then to have some "attendent" retrieve, gut, and clean the deer for processing, only to send it to someone else, is to utterly remove one's self from the fullness of hunting. The hunt is not just the kill. The work begins after you've pulled the trigger. And the feeling of the hunt has far more to do with the stalk in the field than with the watching of an animal die because you sent some signal to a rifle sear.

Question: What happens when the animal goes running off and needs tracking? Does it get chased by the "attendent?" Whose kill is it when the attendent puts it down, finding it gutshot? I mean, he's the only hunter there, right? How does the Internet "Hunter" get to tag an animal that needs one? (The hunter is required to carry his license with him while hunting, and a person may not carry another's license while hunting.) Does the Internet "hunter" get to direct the chase? Or is it a fair chase? Is the placed fenced? I promise you that the camera is over a feeder.

What happens when the net connection is slow, and the shot goes awry, possibly wounding the animal?



I've said it before, and I'll now say it again: some of my most successful hunts that took place over a week or more had me never firing a round at game. Those who would foist this Internet "hunting" off as hunting apparently have no appreciation of that concept. :(

WYO
November 17, 2004, 12:19 PM
What if you hit a "regulated" animal that cannot be seen with the resolution of the video monitor or, worse yet, a person? It sounds like a really bad idea, about one step above a spring gun.

Drizzt
November 17, 2004, 12:33 PM
Hunting via Internet? Officials wary

Computer controls rifle-camera combination

Updated: 11:38 p.m. ET Nov. 16, 2004

HOUSTON - Hunters soon may be able to sit at their computers and blast away at animals on a Texas ranch via the Internet, a prospect that has state wildlife officials up in arms.

A controversial Web site, http:/www.live-shot.com, already offers target practice with a .22 caliber rifle and could soon let hunters shoot at deer, antelope and wild pigs, site creator John Underwood said on Tuesday.

Texas officials are not quite sure what to make of Underwood’s Web site, but may tweak existing laws to make sure Internet hunting does not get out of hand.

“This is the first one I’ve seen,” said Texas Parks and Wildlife Department wildlife director Mike Berger. “The current state statutes don’t cover this sort of thing.”

Underwood, an estimator for a San Antonio, Texas auto body shop, has invested $10,000 to build a platform for a rifle and camera that can be remotely aimed on his 330-acre (133-hectare) southwest Texas ranch by anyone on the Internet anywhere in the world.

The idea came last year while viewing another Web site on which cameras posted in the wild are used to snap photos of animals.

“We were looking at a beautiful white-tail buck and my friend said ’If you just had a gun for that.’ A little light bulb went off in my head,” he said.

Internet hunting could be popular with disabled hunters unable to get out in the woods or distant hunters who cannot afford a trip to Texas, Underwood said.

Berger said state law only covers “regulated animals” such as native deer and birds and cannot prevent Underwood from offering Internet hunts of “unregulated” animals such as non-native deer that many ranchers have imported and wild pigs.

He has proposed a rule that will come up for public discussion in January that anyone hunting animals covered by state law must be physically on site when they shoot.

Berger expressed reservations about remote control hunting, but noted that humans have always adopted new technologies to hunt.

“First it was rocks and clubs, then we sharpened it and put it on a stick. Then there was the bow and arrow, black powder, smokeless power and optics,” Berger said. “Maybe this is the next technological step out there.”

Underwood, 39, said he will offer animal hunting as soon as he gets a fast Internet connection to his remote ranch that will enable hunters to aim the rifle quickly at passing animals.

He said an attendant would retrieve shot animals for the shooters, who could have the heads preserved by a taxidermist. They could also have the meat processed and shipped home, or donated to animal orphanages

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6507424

Heck, I'm just surprised it's taken this long....

Fly320s
November 17, 2004, 12:50 PM
I guess this puts a whole new twist im our Virtual Matches. :what:

RangerHAAF
November 17, 2004, 01:42 PM
Well,

We all knew it was just a matter of time before this kind of thing started.

If this guy gets the go ahead, it will become like internet gambling. The legislature in one state will outlaw it while other states will welcome it and no one will be able to control it.

I must admit that the idea does intrique me but what about wounded animals?

We've become lazy and glued to our computers and so I guess this is the next step. Does anyone have any idea of how much he's planning to charge?

Kinsman
November 17, 2004, 01:48 PM
My first thought was "...where's the fun in that?"

jamz
November 17, 2004, 02:08 PM
Preacherman is too fast for me. I was just going to post this. :)

-James

Preacherman
November 17, 2004, 02:10 PM
Duplicate threads merged.

Art Eatman
November 17, 2004, 07:19 PM
"Internet hunting could be popular with disabled hunters unable to get out in the woods or distant hunters who cannot afford a trip to Texas, Underwood said."

Straw man argument. A disabled hunter can easily sit in a parked vehicle. A parked vehicle is merely a stand located on the ground instead of in a tree or on a tower. Depends on how disabled a guy is, as to his needs...

Art

Smoke
November 17, 2004, 07:25 PM
Another Link (http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=internetNews&storyID=6834613&src=eDialog/GetContent&section=news)

Got this in an email today, you guys are quick.

Here is the website (http://www.live-shot.com)

I think it is insane. You can play first person shooters on the internet that would be more fun than capping rounds remotely. I just don't get it.

Smoke

Delmar
November 17, 2004, 07:53 PM
Sounds like they completely took all the fun out of hunting AND shooting. Gee, what if you miss-does the attendant chamber a new round for you, or is this an autoloader.

As a disabled hunter myself, I see no real advantage to this. The sights, sounds and the whole experience is gone. Might be for a quadrapelegic or some such, but not for me.

Having one leg missing and the other pretty tore up means I can't do what I used to, and that is to stalk, but stand hunting has fed me for a lot of years and I suspect it will continue to do so. Whether or not people think its ethical, or even a "real hunt", I really could care less, although one does get tired of the ranting at times.

Little Loudmouth
November 17, 2004, 10:16 PM
My first thought was "Talk about your road hunting!" Where is the fun? The entire spirit of hunting is gone with this!

DesertRat
November 17, 2004, 10:24 PM
***??? :scrutiny:

This will fail miserably.

rock jock
November 18, 2004, 12:36 AM
I've seen some real lard-*** hunters before, but this takes the cake.

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