.45 ACP vs. .45 Colt


PDA






ForGreatJustice
November 29, 2004, 11:26 PM
I'm trying to decide between a Taurus tracker in .45 Colt or .45 ACP. It'll be used for heavy loads, perhaps hunting, but needs to be pressed into defensive service. Which caliber can achieve heavier loadings in a revolver? Can the Taurus (steel) trackers withstand .45 Super?

If you enjoyed reading about ".45 ACP vs. .45 Colt" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Tom C.
November 29, 2004, 11:36 PM
IMO, in a Smith & Wesson revolver, the .45 ACP and .45 Colt aren't that different. Don't know about the Taurus. In a strong revolver, like the Ruger Blackhawks and Redhawk, the .45 Colt really comes into it's own. It is capable of using much heavier bullets at significant velocities, with up to .44 magnum power. For hunting, in a strong revolver, the .45 Colt is preferred to the .45 ACP. For self defense, the .45 ACP has more than adequate power and a much greater load selection. It also has the advantage of moon clip reloading in double action revolvers. Only you can make the decision on what is important to you.

Black Snowman
November 30, 2004, 12:42 AM
I'd say go .45 Colt, expecially if you reload. The manual says that the Ti model is rated for +P ammo which implies the stainless version isn't. So it definately wouldn't be rated for Super. Main advantage of the .45 ACP version is moon clips. If you're not a huge fan of moon clips then again go Colt.

pezo
November 30, 2004, 01:31 AM
I personally like the 45 acp chambered revolvers mainly cause of the moon clips. they're handy like speedloaders. if I wanted to shoot 45 colts Id probably do it out of a .454 casull revolver. sorta like the .357 or .38 revolver deal.

DHart
December 1, 2004, 07:37 AM
.45 acp is a great defense load but is no match for .45 Colt out of a revolver which can handle some pressure. If you handload, .45 Colt can be rolled from mousephart cowboy loads to beyond what .44 mag can do. It's a remarkable caliber. And .45 Schoenfeld can also be fired in a .45 Colt chambered firearm (like .44 spl in a .44 mag... just a shorter case). I don't know what the Taurus is capable of handling, but a Ruger Blackhawk can take very stout .45 Colt loadings indeed. Personally, I'd get a Winchester 92 Trapper lever rifle in .45 Colt and a Colt 1911 in .45 ACP~! (And I have.) :rolleyes:

MrMurphy
December 1, 2004, 01:21 PM
The .45 Colt in a strong enough revolver can be loaded much heavier than a .45 ACP (much more case capacity). In the low to medium loads it's not much different in power level from many .45 ACP loads, but the higher end loads leave the ACP in the dust performance-wise. So in a hunting gun, the .45 Colt is superior. Toss in some 240g hollowpoints and it will certainly do fine for antipersonnel use though.

Vern Humphrey
December 1, 2004, 02:09 PM
In my Colt New Service (made in 1906, with a 7 1/2" barrel) I like a 255 grain wide flat nose bullet (Lee mould) and 19 grains of H4227. This gives about 1000 fps.

Compare that to a .45 ACP +P load of a 230 grain bullet at just below that velocity, and you see there isn't much difference -- certainly none that a critter on the receiving end could tell.

Now, with my Ruger Blackhawk, I can drive the same bullet to well over 1300fps, and that DOES make a difference.

Personally, I'd prefer the .45 Colt -- just because I like those big old cases.

SteelEye
December 2, 2004, 11:40 AM
You can load 45 ACP/AR to mild 44 magnum levels (185gr bullet @ 1400 fps). However, case life will be shorter and there are presure problems. Using appropriate brass, the 45 Colt is a much lower pressure round and can be loaded to much higher velocites with heavier bullets then the 45 ACP/AR without concerns of cylinder or top strap issues.

On the other hand, the 45 ACP/AR can give you much cheaper ammunition using lighter bullets and less powder. I selected the 45 ACP/AR (625) because there was unlimited range brass available where I shot. I've yet to see a single 45 Colt case lying on the ground.

As a result of getting carried away with very hot 45 ACP/AR loadings I decided to get something more suitable, a 44 mag. Now I load the 625 back to normal loads.

Vern Humphrey
December 2, 2004, 11:54 AM
For general use as a carry or walking in the woods gun, the .45 ACP chambering is fine. For taking large game, the .45 Colt would be the choice -- in a revolver capable of taking max loads, like the Ruger Blackhawk.

I don't have a .44 Mag, and don't need one -- the .45 Colt in the Blackhawk actually has a slight edge on the .44 Mag, with the right loads.

vwfool
December 2, 2004, 03:00 PM
I think that you need to do a side by side comparison. You buy both and try thwm out. I'll dispose of whichever one you don't want. :evil:

I personally want the ACP one in a 2" Tracker and a Marlin Camp Carbine to go with it.

I'd recomend ACP, especially if you don't reload. It is much cheaper to shoot when you're buying loaded ammo at the store.

Quantrill
December 2, 2004, 04:19 PM
Not even in the same class for power. .45 Colt in the proper Revolver is a bear. I don't know about Taurus though. quantrill

Burt Blade
December 4, 2004, 09:28 PM
I feel obliged to remind folks that "hot" .45 Colt loads should only be used in guns that can handle them, like the Ruger Blackhawk. (and even there, don't try to make it a .4 Mag) Hot loads are absolutely not for any Colt Single Action Army or clone, nor are they for Granpap's World War One Smith and Wesson. They are also not for _modern_ Smith and Wesson N frame guns. Stick to SAMMI spec stuff for S&W, Colt, and clones.

If you want a moose-stomper, buy a .44 Magnum or a .454 Casul. They have much greater safety margins.

Vern Humphrey
December 4, 2004, 09:52 PM
In the Ruger Blackhawk, the .45 Colt can be loaded to about 30,000 PSI, and that will drive a 255 grain bullet to a bit more than 1300 fps. That's almost exactly what the .44 Magnum will do. With really heavy bullets, the .45 Colt begins to pull away from the .44 Mag.

Now, in practical terms, there isn't any difference a deer or bear would notice -- but anyone who has .45 Ruger Blackhawk in .45 Colt doesn't need to run out and buy a .44 Magnum.

DHart
December 5, 2004, 04:59 AM
And for those that might not be aware... in a modern levergun (Winchester 92, 94, Marlin 1894) you can load .45 Colt right on up there... surpassing .44 magnum. And when loaded to comparable performance with .44 mag (equal bullet weight at equal velocity), the .45 Colt is at lower pressure.

stans
December 5, 2004, 10:25 AM
ForGreatJustice, since you specified "heavy loads" I would opt for 45 Colt. As for the Taurus Tracker being capable of handling hot 45 Colt loads, I can't say for certain. The tracker does have the cylinder bolt notched located between the chambers, so this improved cylinder wall thickness, a weak point in the S&W design. Trackers are also chambered in 44 magnum, so they may be strong enough for hot Colt loads. I would inspect a Taurus revolver closely before buying, quality seems to vary.

Magnum88C
December 5, 2004, 04:01 PM
If you really want to load the .45 Colt up, up and away (or use Buff Bore type loads), stick to Ruger Blackhawks, vaqueros, Redhawks, Super Redhawks, and modern lever guns.

Vern Humphrey
December 5, 2004, 04:50 PM
Quote:
------------------------------------
And for those that might not be aware... in a modern levergun (Winchester 92, 94, Marlin 1894) you can load .45 Colt right on up there... surpassing .44 magnum. And when loaded to comparable performance with .44 mag (equal bullet weight at equal velocity), the .45 Colt is at lower pressure.
------------------------------------

Absolutely -- in fact, the Colt will do great things at around 28,000 to 30,000 PSI in a gun that is strong enough, while a ,44 Mag needs 10-15% more pressure.

In fairness, however, there's less "meat" in a .45 -- the bigger hole means less metal to deal with pressure. But in modern leverguns and the Blackhawk/Vaquero, you can outshoot a .44 Mag with a .45 Colt.

If you enjoyed reading about ".45 ACP vs. .45 Colt" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!