Letter to the public from an Officer


PDA






TheFederalistWeasel
December 5, 2004, 07:50 PM
Watch out for the CSI effect. There is no machine that we can drop an eyelash into and come up with the DNA profile,fingerprints and mug shot of the owner in 2 minutes.

When you see an emergency vehicle behind you with its lights and sirens on: pull to the RIGHT, and Stop. We are usually required to pass cars on the left.

Dunkin' donuts has much better coffee than they do doughnuts.

When you're driving in the fast lane and you see a cop behind you don't, go 5 mph's under the speed limit. We are not impressed by how safe of a driver you can be, we're trying to go help someone (or catch that guy in the SUV that just cut you off). Safely move over and let us pass by you, please.

If you get a warning instead of a ticket from a motorcycle cop...go buy a lottery ticket, because you've already beaten the odds.

When you see an officer conducting a traffic stop,[or with a suspect in handcuffs] it is generally not a good idea to approach him/her and ask for directions. If you do, don't expect the officer to be nice when he/she tells you to get lost, and don't expect the officer to take the time to
explain. (this has happened to me twice)

If a cop causes a car accident we usually get a ticket, and sometimes we get suspended. When is the last time you got 3 days off [without pay] for rear-ending a guy at Wal-mart.

If you think you can fan all the pot smoke out of the car before we smell it, good luck.

We know you've had more than 2 beers. I've never had two beers hit six parked cars and driven my car through the front doors of a Toys-R-Us, pissed my pants, and passed out with my foot on the gas.

Here's how to get out of a ticket, don't break the law in the first place.

If you drive a piece of junk car; this is why you're getting pulled over. In one week I pulled over 10 cars for minor equipment violations.
8 out of 10 had no vehicle insurance,
7 out of 10 had suspended drivers licenses,
5 out of 10 had warrants, 2 out of 10 had felony warrants,
and 1 out of 10 was a known sex offender with his 12 year old niece in the car without her mothers knowledge.
Of the 2 out of 10 that didn't have any other violations, one was given a fix-it-ticket and the other was given a warning(and if you are trying to do the math many had multiple violations)

If you've just been pulled over how doing 70 in a 35 Do Not greet the officer with what seems to be the problem, officer.

We get coffee breaks too, and sometimes we run into stores and do some shopping during them.

When you're the victim of a burglary take the time you spend waiting for the officer to find the model #'s and the serial #'s of the stuff that was taken.

Some cops are just jerks, but take heart in the fact that other cops don't like them either. (Oh so true)

If it's nighttime and you're driving a vehicle with tinted windows and I pull you over. It's not because of your skin color, I usually can't tell if the vehicle even has a driver until the windows rolled down.

Cops make mistakes, and sometimes they are big mistakes.

Some cops are bad, and sometimes they're real bad.

Every time you hear on the news about people running away from a crazed gunman, someone's son or daughter in a blue or brown uniform is running TOWARD that crazed gunman.

Yes it's true, cops usually don't give other cops speeding tickets. Think of it as an employee discount, perk or benefit, and unless you're a habitual speeder all you ever get is a fine.

If your local police agency has a helicopter everyone knows it's loud and annoying, but did you know it can cover the same area as 15-20 patrol officers, and safely chase criminals that are driving 90 MPH through city streets. Many times the guy has no idea it's there and slows down.

Your 5 year old kid getting pushed down by another 5 year old kid IS NOT a police matter, talk to the other kids parents.

If your kid won't do his homework or do his chores,911 is not the answer for a uniformed second-string parent.

If you hit your spouse in front of your children,your children will hit their spouse in front of their children.

Police work is...writing reports.

If you rob a gas station you're only going to get $20, but I get to see a K-9 dog use your arm as a chew toy. For all I care you can keep the $20.

In 1 year of patrol work in a large city only about 10 minutes would be cool enough to be on the television show, COPS. But if COPS was about report writing and accident reports each show would
be a year long.

Every traffic stop could end in gunfire, but we have to be polite and professional until that time.

I've taken about the same amount of men/women to jail for domestic violence, so NO it's not always the man.

People love fire fighters.

Attention Victims: I need to know the WHO,WHAT,WHERE,WHEN, and HOW. Not what meds you're on or what your 15 cats have peed on.

Some cops don't like to be called cops. I don't know why, but most don't care -- we've been called worse.

If you find crack pipes in the ladies purse, there is a good chance they belong to her.

Cops know you pay taxes and that your taxes pay cops' salaries. Cops also pay taxes, which also pay cops' salaries so, hey, this traffic stop is on me. Now sign here; press hard your making five copies.

And a Variation On The Above --- Irate Offender: My tax money pays your salary, so you work for me! LEO: I pay taxes, too, so I figure I'm self-employed.

When you see an officer walk into the room, a polite greeting of Hello, how are you? is much more appropriate than, Uh-Oh Jim, it looks like they're here for you! or putting your arms up and exclaiming, I didn't do it! It will surely save you from looking like an unoriginal horse's arse.

If there are police cars, fire trucks, or ambulances at your neighbor's house then there is a problem. You don't need to meddle into your neighbor's business by asking us what's happening. Your curiosity, no matter how strong, is not a reason violate your neighbor's privacy. If it's something that YOU need to worry about, we would've knocked on your door and told you.

Remember that you and I enjoy the benefits of Constitutional rights. And so does the guy you suspect of stealing your stuff. No, I can't go search his house for your property just because you suspect he might be involved.

No, I don't know your cousin who's a police officer in (fill in location anywhere in the US) (We Don't All Know Each Other

No your crappy band doesn't have until 10:00pm to blast your crappy music out of that garage.

If I can see a 12 year old in your house finishing off a beer with a bong hit I don't need a warrant.

If you don't know what the speed limit in your neighborhood is what makes you think it's 65.

If a neighborhood association asks for police to start ticketing in their neighborhood, one of the first five ticketed
is on the board of the association.

When you're blocking an area to traffic (both foot and vehicle), "No, you can't go that way" doesn't
mean, "You're special, so by all means, go ahead."

If an officer is standing in front of you with his hand outstretched, waving furiously at you, plus he's yelling for you
to "Stop", it's usually a good idea to do as he asks. Please don't keep driving towards the officer (as happened to me the other night).

Flares + cruiser parked at an angle equals a place you can't go, even if it's a ramp to the interstate.

Don't run from the police and then attempt to hide in a warehouse. Especially don't do this if the officers tell you that the dog is going to be let loose, as this will generally result in the dog winning. They leave some pretty marks, by the way.

Stop resisting means exactly that. Don't say "I'm not resisting" as you throw a punch at the officer's face.

Just because you're handcuffed doesn't mean you won't go on the ground if you attempt to assault an officer. We don't even make exceptions for pregnant women who bite us, either.

Did you really think I wasn't going to find that large lump of crack you got clenched in your butt? Come on, it's either the world's largest 'roid, or you got something you ain't supposed to have.

If they tell you they borrowed the jacket from a friend, just before you search it, they've got something, and it's still gonna be their jacket.

For some reason, you think I'll believe it when you tell me that you don't know how it got there. (see above)

Stopping a green man in a blue shirt and pink pants a block away from an armed robbery when the suspect description is a
green man in a blue shirt and pink pants...IS NOT racial profiling.

Just because you have your hazard lights on, doesn't mean it is okay to park in the fire lane and run into the store. Even
if you really need milk!

No I will not go get your 6 year old from their friends house, because it is 1:00am and you don't want to drive 3
minutes. Maybe you should set a curfew, and enforce it. I am not a bad police officer, you're a bad parent.

And Last but not least: 99% of Police Officers do their job honestly and with great pride, we try to do our job
well.

Often we have to work in environments where we are the only ones that have to follow the rules.

A veteran Sergeant told me on my first day of patrol when you wear that uniform everything you do is a liability.

We do make mistakes and due to the nature of the job sometimes they have horrible results.

If you enjoyed reading about "Letter to the public from an Officer" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Moondoggie
December 5, 2004, 08:22 PM
Amen and Amen!

I was a reserve officer for 2 yrs...was offered a full-time position but knew that I'd never last to retirement. I could see the burnout factor loud and clear. It was a cut in pay from my regular civilian employment.

The downside for me was the depression factor of most of the folks we dealt with. 90% definately weren't happy to see us, and most of them weren't bashful about letting us know that. Nobody was "ready for company" when we arrived...gawd, does everybody live like a slob??? Are there any happily married responsible folks left on the planet? Oh, yeah...and the parents....geeesh! Even in a town of 15K in South Dakota there was a significant % of folks who just weren't going into handcuffs without a fight simply as a matter of course. Of course, WE were the dirty, no good, SOB's who roughed 'em up in the process.

One of the highlights was having the judge stop the tape of our conversation with a DUI suspect to ask him "Is that you refering to MY police officer as a *&%$#!!"? When he responded in the affirmative the judge immediately sentenced him to 3 days for contempt of court; for cursing at an "Officer of the Court" in the performance of his duties. "Frontier Justice" I guess.

Anyway, I hear 'ya! And thank you for your service!!!

Be careful out there!

Brick
December 5, 2004, 08:23 PM
Cops know you pay taxes and that your taxes pay cops' salaries. Cops also pay taxes, which also pay cops' salaries so, hey, this traffic stop is on me. Now sign here; press hard your making five copies.

http://www.uzi-world.net/smilies/biggrin.gif

longrifleman
December 5, 2004, 09:03 PM
If you rob a gas station you're only going to get $20, but I get to see a K-9 dog use your arm as a chew toy. For all I care you can keep the $20.

I'll chip in a few bucks too. Cheap entertainment. :evil:

fjolnirsson
December 5, 2004, 09:10 PM
Awesome! :D
Thanks for that. Quite a fun read. If more folks would take the time to go through citizens academies...
Well, I guess we'd have a lot more knowitalls who have been through a citizens academy. ;)

Moparmike
December 5, 2004, 09:35 PM
I agree with about 95% of that. And the only time I am not happy to see an officer is when I am in a car. Maybe its because the ones around here love to tailgate you (and they get so close that I can barely see headlights) to intimidate you into screwing up. Last week was the first time in 5 years that I hadn't had one light me up when he tailgated me. I guess he had better things to do... :cuss:

Anyway...
If your kid won't do his homework or do his chores,911 is not the answer for a uniformed second-string parent.I agree entirely. However, exactly how are you supposed to enforce this sort of thing when grounding rarely works because your kid has gizmos in his room and doesnt get out much, and spanking is only allowed by the state? It almost seems like discipline isnt allowed anymore.



Sorry, this turned into a bit of a rant. *sigh*

nhhillbilly
December 5, 2004, 09:52 PM
this is one of the best I have seen.

Rich K
December 5, 2004, 11:17 PM
One of the very best that I have seen.I interact with police officers every day,and the attitude of the general public towards them,or anyone in a public service profession,always amazes me.We are all jerks,until they get a boo-boo,or someone takes theirlollypop.Then we are heroes who come to their rescue.I applaude your service ,Sir,and thank you for doing a very tough job.God bless you,and all in your profession.

Declaration Day
December 5, 2004, 11:31 PM
"If there are police cars, fire trucks, or ambulances at your neighbor's house then there is a problem. You don't need to meddle into your neighbor's business by asking us what's happening. Your curiosity, no matter how strong, is not a reason violate your neighbor's privacy. If it's something that YOU need to worry about, we would've knocked on your door and told you."

This reminds me of an amusing summer at my neighbor's house.

I had a crackhead living next to me, and he fit the description of many of the lowlives on COPS. Mullet, bandanna, no shirt EVER, looked like the living dead, that was him.

Anyway the local police were at his house atleast once a week, either for a drug bust or domestic violence. Often it involved a new girlfriend who moved in right away and then left a week later after said crackhead beat her.

Eventually, since the cops were often there for 30-60 minutes while everything was resolved, I began to talk to them and they would tell me everything that happened.

I even fired up the grill many times and offered them burgers and hot dogs. They were a good bunch of guys.

The neighbor has long since had his home foreclosed upon. I don't miss him one bit, but it was interesting to be close to the action.

kayak bum
December 5, 2004, 11:53 PM
Wow! People in other jurisdictions say and do these things too???

Awesome!!!

docfubar
December 6, 2004, 12:00 AM
Do you mind if I copy this and print it out to show my LT and my acadamy class?

joeoim
December 6, 2004, 01:10 AM
Good read, Thanks for sharing.

Joe

Chuck Dye
December 6, 2004, 01:28 AM
MoparMike,

Thank you for the rant about tail gaters in patrol cars. Thought you might have fun with one of my favorite gags. I am a long haul trucker and have more opportunity than most to observe such driving. On occasion, I will get on the CB (Children’s Band) and, in my cheesiest movie Mexican accent proclaim, "Following deestance? We don’ need no steenking following deestance! We haf badches!" Now highway patrol officers who still listen to a CB are few and far between but every once in a while I get a very satisfying reaction!

You may use this without attribution. :D

Flyboy
December 6, 2004, 01:29 AM
If there are police cars, fire trucks, or ambulances at your neighbor's house then there is a problem. You don't need to meddle into your neighbor's business by asking us what's happening. Your curiosity, no matter how strong, is not a reason violate your neighbor's privacy. If it's something that YOU need to worry about, we would've knocked on your door and told you.

At the same time, when there are six squad cars in my apartment complex's parking lot, and a dozen cops crawling around the complex, I do think I have a need to know what's going on in and around my home, if only to know what to watch out for that warrants that many badges.

--Flyboy, who really does appreciate the police, and who sent a man to jail not three hours ago

Firethorn
December 6, 2004, 02:03 AM
You know, I kinda agree with Flyboy. Had a number of cops show up to pound on my neighbor's door (apartment). I just wanted to know if it would be a good idea to hide in my bathtub...

Gifted
December 6, 2004, 02:30 AM
You mind if I repost this in a few places where it would be appreciated?

TheFederalistWeasel
December 6, 2004, 02:39 AM
Okay, personal experience here from an officer who worked in South Atlanta.

A lot of times when you have a situation unfolding which to quote Flyboy warrant that many badges around here, we the patrol officers who wear those badges in all actuality may, ourselves, not be completely sure what is going on, it may be the call just came out, shots fired in you apartment complex and we responded 6 deep, we just arrive on scene and most of us are staging outside or attempting to assess the need for a perimeter or we may have been told to standby by a supervisor and that’s what we are doing.

On the other hand it may be a 10-78 call (Officer needs assistance) I which case I am only focusing on the Officer who just yelled for help and nothing else, ain’t got time to stop and chat with you.

You rushing up to me asking what’s going on when I just heard my buddy screaming for help over the radio is not a good idea. You hear these guys day in and day out on the radio, normal tone, these are your friends, brothers and sister officers.

To hear them literally screaming on the radio for backup 10-18, you go from sipping that cup of coffee bored to tears droning over the report you are writing, trying to put someone’s stupidity into words, to full blown Holy ????? adrenaline rush instantly.

Also, who are you, why are you here, maybe you are part of the problem, creating a distraction etc… get the idea?

Best thing to do in your case is assume the worst, go to your SHTF plan and either GTHOFD or shelter in place until the all clear has sounded.


When in doubt go and hide in that bathtub.


Not trying to be mean by any means just being real.

TheFederalistWeasel
December 6, 2004, 02:41 AM
This is not my work; I should have stated that in the original post.

I’m sorry.

I took this from a LEO board I am a member of and posted it in its entirety here

pax
December 6, 2004, 03:08 AM
You know, I kinda agree with Flyboy. Had a number of cops show up to pound on my neighbor's door (apartment). I just wanted to know if it would be a good idea to hide in my bathtub...
Several years ago, my husband and I lived in a tiny little rundown house in a rotten neighborhood, because we were saving up to buy a house of our own.

Coming home from church one day, we rounded the corner to our place and found a dozen patrol cars -- from different jurisdictions, yet -- pulling into the area. There were officers on foot wearing black from head to toe, complete with ski masks and toting long guns and a dozen officers piling out of the back of some kind of paddy wagon/van thing.

Bob and I looked at each other, then he put the car in reverse and we went out to lunch. I figured I'd rather read it in the paper the next day than watch it live.

There wasn't room for both of us (and our three small children) in the bathtub. And the tub was made of fiberglass ... :uhoh:

pax

RevDisk
December 6, 2004, 03:17 AM
Na. The worst is when you get pulled over and the cop says "Wait a second, aren't you (my last name)? You're in Sergeant's (my boss' last name) unit?" The cop then proceeded to call my boss over the radio, and my boss smoked me for about 15 minutes.

From the look of the drivers of passing vehicles, it's like they've never seen a Sergeant smoking a private with UP-DOWN-GO's in the freezing cold. I wish he'd have just given me the ticket...

:evil:

c_yeager
December 6, 2004, 03:28 AM
I agree entirely. However, exactly how are you supposed to enforce this sort of thing when grounding rarely works because your kid has gizmos in his room and doesnt get out much, and spanking is only allowed by the state? It almost seems like discipline isnt allowed anymore.

Take away their toys and spank them anyways? Oh, and when your done how about MAKING them go outside and play and make friends. We have enough chubby little kids with no social skills in this country as it is.

SMMAssociates
December 6, 2004, 03:35 AM
Been there, done that, bought and burned the T-Shirt.... Great post!

(Rent-A-Cop since the late 60's.)

If you really want to know what those Fire and Police vehicles are doing next door, buy a scanner. Much safer than sticking your head out the door to ask....

When the Troop comes flying out of the bushes and lights up while you're passing me, do not pull into the right lane and stand on the brakes. My reaction time sucks. That's why I bought a radar detector. Happened to me twice on the same stretch of the WV Turnpike....

(I get tickets. I don't give 'em.... Actually, I haven't had one since 1968, but it's early today....)

And, you've been doing this too long when you're driving down the road and see a somebody make a stop and pull in behind him for backup. Then you realize you're in the wrong state....

(I told this to a friend who's a retired Lieutenant with a nearby PD. He admitted having done it.)

Two things to remember. "Common sense goes a long way", and "LEOs are human too." Be careful out there....

SMMAssociates
December 6, 2004, 03:43 AM
You'll like this....

A friend of mine is an Officer with a local PD. Just a grunt....

He stops at the local Dairy Queen or whatever, and comes out with a cone in his hand, at which point a sweet young thing stops him for directions.

A few seconds later, his Captain (also a friend of mine) stops by and decides that he should have better things to do.

Captain, being very thorough, spends a bit of time explaining this to the younger Officer.

During which time there is ice cream running down his arm....

They tell me that the celebration when the older guy retired was something to see....

denfoote
December 6, 2004, 05:38 AM
Dunkin' donuts has much better coffee than they do doughnuts.

I dunno. For some unknown reason this reminds me of an old joke:

Officer: Your eyes appear bloodshot. Have you been drinking??

Motorist: Well officer, your eyes appear glazed. Have you been eating doughnuts???

It's humor, Son!!! :D

Art Eatman
December 6, 2004, 09:27 AM
Moparmike, the whole idea of raising a kid is to train and educate the little devil so he doesn't wind up in the Weasel's list of Fun Things.

This requires knowing a bit more about lifeitsownself than a little kid. :)

Gizmos in his room? Powered by electricity? Hey, circuit breakers have an "Off" position. You don't even have to remove gizmos and strain your back!

Kids are easy. Mine once got fussy about his spinach. So, "Hey, son, if you don't eat your spinach, you can't go to bed." Turned out that he actually sorta liked spinach...

"But why do I have to do that?" is a common question. The easy answer is, "Because I'm teaching you how to live right, so you don't grow up all stupid and useless. I love you, and I want to be able to like you, as well."

Less grownup-age involvement with dogs' teeth and flashing light and handcuffs, that way...

:), Art

Dbl0Kevin
December 6, 2004, 10:32 AM
Na. The worst is when you get pulled over and the cop says "Wait a second, aren't you (my last name)? You're in Sergeant's (my boss' last name) unit?" The cop then proceeded to call my boss over the radio, and my boss smoked me for about 15 minutes.

Hehe my dad had the reverse story funny enough. Back in the 60's when he was in the Army Reserves as an MP he also worked as a cop. Well his Sgt. was really riding him hard about some stupid nonsense that I don't remember, but it was known that the Sgt. was a drunk and would go to the bar and get smashed every night. So my dad had one of his buddies in the town wait for him to leave the bar and pull him over......after he does my dad pulls up in the patrol car and "well well well......what do we have here???"........Needless to say the Sgt. didn't bother him after that night. :D

Omni04
December 6, 2004, 11:30 AM
would anybody be mad if i used that whole spiel as my sig line? ^_^

PaleRyder
December 6, 2004, 11:36 AM
Great post. I have a lot of respect for the police, because they rarely ever get to deal with anyone other than the dregs of society.

Devonai
December 6, 2004, 12:42 PM
If you don't know what the speed limit in your neighborhood is what makes you think it's 65?

I was taught that if you don't know, assume it's 25 on side streets and 45 on rural roads.

why_me
December 6, 2004, 12:54 PM
Is there ticket quotas? I heard the number of tickets given out was a way to evaluate personnel. I know in very small communities the police department is used as a source of revenue.

grampster
December 6, 2004, 12:56 PM
Heh heh....It's nice to see not much has changed since the 60's...heh heh.

juggler
December 6, 2004, 01:12 PM
That was worth printing. I know a few LEO's that will be nodding as they read it. Thanks for sharing.

SMMAssociates
December 6, 2004, 01:22 PM
Is there ticket quotas? I heard the number of tickets given out was a way to evaluate personnel. I know in very small communities the police department is used as a source of revenue. As a rent-a-cop, I can take a shot at this without fear of the full time guys on the board.... :)

There are quotas, and performance monitoring issues in some PDs....

Mostly the latter....

A local PD used to run a very profitable speed trap, too, but when they were forced to send their citations to a Municipal Court that could keep most of the fines, instead of the Mayor's Court, that mostly went away. They still patrol agressively, and there are some nasty tricks with speed limit signs still in place, but locals don't plan their trips "around" there any more.

A competent Officer will try to fill his quota (whether it's "Write 100 tickets or else!" or "You'd better turn in four or five a day.") with folks who really earn them. If management is competent too, they probably will target certain areas or intersections and worry more about visibility than paper.

(Most traffic cites should be educational, not punitive. The fine is supposed to make you remember what not to do. Sometimes the Officer will decide that a warning is sufficient too. Some Officers should be forced to take a friend of mine's not-quite-helped-by-Ritalin youngster to a toy store, too, but that's another story.)

Short answer: It depends on the PD.... Competent management will look at overall statistics. Others will just look at body counts.... :(

I'm reminded of a major PD in a large Western city which installed an electronic combination lock on the back door so the troops could get in without keys (which tended to wander off). Within a week somebody had scratched the combination into the paint on the door....

Hawkmoon
December 6, 2004, 01:23 PM
Good post.

I take issue with only two of the points you raised.

(1) Yes, I know cops don't ticket other cops. That doesn't make it right. It's wrong. The laws apply to everyone, equally.

(2) If I come home and find fire engines, ambulances and police cars lined up in front of my neighbors' house, I'm not going to be "curious" -- I'm going to be "concerned" -- maybe even "worried." Yes, I'll head over there, on the double. I won't get in anyone's way if I can help it, but I will want to know if my neighbors are okay and if there's anything I can do to help with whatever the problem happens to be. Don't allow your professional jaundice toward humanity in general blind you to the fact that some neighbors are more than just people who live in the house next door.

tyme
December 6, 2004, 01:55 PM
Cops know you pay taxes and that your taxes pay cops' salaries. Cops also pay taxes, which also pay cops' salaries so, hey, this traffic stop is on me. Now sign here; press hard your making five copies.

And a Variation On The Above --- Irate Offender: My tax money pays your salary, so you work for me! LEO: I pay taxes, too, so I figure I'm self-employed.
Police officers are public agents. Whether they pay taxes, as private citizens do, is irelevant. What is relevant is that they are paid from public funds.

Irate offenders or dumb motorists making dumb statements doesn't change that. No, an officer doesn't work for me or for Ira T. Offender. But the officer certainly doesn't work for himself, any more than the government works for itself. Police work for the public at large -- the public trust -- which is not the same as the public majority, and they should keep that foremost in their minds. Simply benefitting the public good is not their job. This is not a democracy, and even if it were, current laws are not purely utilitarian. Police work to enforce the public good where it is legitimately perscribed by law, but in other cases they must enforce individual rights even when it does not serve the public good.

In a more philosophical sense, law enforcement officers do not work for their department, and they do not work to generate revenue. They are ultimately tasked with enforcing the Bill of Rights (insert generic 14th Am. incorporation argument here), even when doing so is anti-utilitarian and requires non-enforcement of state and federal laws. Sadly, that is often not reflected in reality, especially in cities.

SMMAssociates
December 6, 2004, 02:04 PM
(1) Yes, I know cops don't ticket other cops. That doesn't make it right. It's wrong. The laws apply to everyone, equally.This appears to be a "local" thing. The further West you go, the more likely this is. "Back East" there are places where anything short of a Felony is going to be ignored, and the odds are good that more serious activities will be handled quietly. In other areas you don't want to forget to signal a turn..... I know a guy, working LEO, who was ticketed by the Highway Patrol when he managed to drive between the wrong cones in a construction area. The HP guy knew he was LE, and that the ticket was probably going to be vacated, but he wrote it anyway. (The cones were improperly placed; the Judge tore up the cite.)

(2) If I come home and find fire engines, ambulances and police cars lined up in front of my neighbors' house, I'm not going to be "curious" -- I'm going to be "concerned" -- maybe even "worried." Yes, I'll head over there, on the double. I won't get in anyone's way if I can help it, but I will want to know if my neighbors are okay and if there's anything I can do to help with whatever the problem happens to be. Don't allow your professional jaundice toward humanity in general blind you to the fact that some neighbors are more than just people who live in the house next door. There's no good reason to not carefully scope out the situation, or fire up the barbie for that matter, but charging through the skirmish line (or the crime scene tape) is not a good idea. Other than hostage or barricaded suspect situations, there's probably nothing you can do that can't wait until things quiet down a bit. Taking care of the neighbor's kids or pets, putting some plywood over a broken window or door, etc. No reason why you can't talk to somebody and make the offer eventually. The whole idea is to not get in the way.

When I went to school for this (1967-1968), most of what they taught us in this area was "Protect The Scene." For the guys who were getting extra points for spelling their names right, that's pretty much the Eddie Eagle approach. "Don't Touch.", "Run away.", "Find and adult." (You had to be there....) If the PD or Fire folks need neighbor assistance, they'll ask. These situations tend to quiet down pretty quickly, at which point you can approach safely. The best time for that may be when the SWAT guys are walking back out, or the FD is rolling up their hoses.

Firethorn
December 6, 2004, 03:16 PM
It wasn't so much me "rushing up to the officer" It's more like the guy on the other side of the apartment hallway opening the door wondering what's going on, and asking "do I need to be worried?".

The police were pounding on that door so loud I thought they were knocking on mine. Didn't know they were cops until I opened the door. Had a CZ IWB in my back. Didn't turn around. :uhoh:

Cops answer: "Noise complaint".

It was late at night, I was ready for bed, and really didn't want to go anywhere. I went to bed.

jnojr
December 6, 2004, 03:17 PM
I had a crackhead living next to me, and he fit the description of many of the lowlives on COPS. Mullet, bandanna, no shirt EVER, looked like the living dead, that was him.

Anyway the local police were at his house atleast once a week, either for a drug bust or domestic violence. Often it involved a new girlfriend who moved in right away and then left a week later after said crackhead beat her.

Why is it that creeps like that can have an unending supply of girlfriends, but I can't find one to save my soul from the Devil??? :D

R.H. Lee
December 6, 2004, 03:32 PM
:D Good post.

Azrael256
December 6, 2004, 04:14 PM
Most traffic cites should be educational, not punitive. The fine is supposed to make you remember what not to do. Having grown up the son of a Deputy Chief in Dallas, I can attest to that one. It was 0300. I saw the red light. I saw no other traffic. I turned right without stopping... I didn't see the cruiser. The officer stopped me, and per my father's instruction, I did the whole routine. Dome light, keys on the dash, insurance and license in one hand hanging out the window, other one on the wheel. I even put out my cigarette. The officer greets me (rather politely, actually), and has a look at my license... Then he looks at me... Then at the cute redhead I was taking home... And then he got this REALLY evil grin.

"WELL I'LL BE DAMNED, BOY! I haven't seen you since you was *this* tall. Listen here, little lady, I saw this boy when his daddy brought him to the station the day he was born. He was just a tiny little thing back then, but we knew he was gonna grow up to be one helluva man. Looks like he did alright finding you there..."

This went on for ten... agonizing... minutes. This stupid ()*&$(&#^ just wouldn't shut up. I thought that if I jumped out of the car and took a swing at him he just might toss me in the cruiser and stop this. I was mortified, and the girl was struggling to breathe between bouts of hysterical laughter.

He finished his speech, pitched my license back in my lap, looked at me, pointed and said, "Don't run red lights." Then he walked back to his cruiser and drove off.

I will never, ever do that again.

Snake Eyes
December 6, 2004, 04:40 PM
Why is it that creeps like that can have an unending supply of girlfriends, but I can't find one to save my soul from the Devil???

Simple!

They have crack! You don't!

Mk VII
December 6, 2004, 04:54 PM
here, from a murder trial which ended here [UK] last week in conviction of one David Bieber, who was also wanted in FL for murder, is a reminder of how quickly a routine traffic stop on a stolen car can accelerate into something far worse.
They turned on the the recorder in the squad car before it started:-
PC Roper : I'd think you'd appreciate if you were in Canada and somebody stole your car and the police arrested someone in possession of your car, you'd expect them to be questioned, wouldn't you?
Suspect: Yeah.
Roper: I see what you're saying, but you'd expect 'em to be questioned, I'm afraid. I'm not saying you are, but people do tell us lies, and obviously you've to explain how you got possession of a car reported stolen.
Suspect: Yeah.
Roper: That's down to the officers to ask you; that's why you're going back to station.
Suspect : So how long is this going to ... ?
Roper: Just try and relax for us, don't get all wound up, eh?
Suspect: I told you ... I mean I got, I need to take my medication.
PC Broadhurst: What medication are you on?
Suspect: Serazone and Alprazolam.
Broadhurst: What's that for?
Suspect: Anxiety disorder. (Pause) Claustrophobia.
(Tapping sound, noise of vehicles outside car, whistling)
Broadhurst: (Singing)
Suspect: Am I gonna be gone all night then?
Broadhurst: Sorry.
Suspect: I'll be gone all night.
Broadhurst: No.
Suspect: Until when?
Broadhurst: Don't know yet, mate.
A few moments later...
Roper: Do you wanna, er ... put cuffs on him?
Broadhurst: Up to you, d'ya wanna?
Roper: Yeah, double safety, mate.
(Sound of vehicle door opening, very loud whistling)
Roper: Stop hold there mate, just stop there.
Suspect: Right.
Roper: Cos we're transporting you, we're having to put handcuffs on you all right?
Suspect: No, (Pause) I got...
Roper: Claustrophobic.
Suspect: Yeah.
Roper: Well I'm sorry you can't sit behind us when we're er ...
(Sound of handcuff ratchet)
Suspect: Mate, lis... lis... Listen, don't, don't.
Roper: He's got a gun.
16.07.30 hours is the timing of the first shot.
(Gunshot 1)
(Loud screaming)
(Shots 2, 3, 4) (Screams)
"No don't, don't." (Pause)
"Please, please no." (Shot 5)
16.07.38 hours is the timing of the final shot (sound of radio communication)

jdkelly
December 6, 2004, 08:04 PM
Yes it's true, cops usually don't give other cops speeding tickets. ...---From List Copied by TheFederalistWeasel

TheFederalistWeasel,

I'm not attacking you I just want to understand how one rationalizes not enforcing the law.

Do LEOs come out of the Academy with the belief that they are exempt from certain laws. Is it something they learn or are pressured into early in their careers? Is it done to defend ones self or ones family from retaliation?

What other laws don't apply to LEOs?

The reason I ask is because my nephew once asked me why a police cruiser didn't use his turn signal when he ran a stop sign. I think I told him that I guess he didn't see any Police around.:)


Respectfully,

jdkelly

TheFederalistWeasel
December 6, 2004, 08:34 PM
I don’t ticket other cops; you really must screw up for me to take a cop to jail.

No we don’t come out of the Academy with a sense of entitlement in fact if anything you come out of the Academy with a clear understanding of just how fragile your State certification is and how quickly it can be revoked for criminal activity.

You are not pressured at least not where I’ve worked, professional courtesy is something you don’t command or ask for; if it is going to happen it will happen.

Many times I’ve gone to calls not using my lights/siren for various reasons and yes I did break a traffic law or two or three while responding, people don’t know the whole situation, I don’t expect them to, I think that’s why we have ride along programs, come see for yourself just how unique each response is and can be.

Now, that said I also don’t give tickets to Fire Dept or EMS Personnel, or Nurses and Doctors etc… basically anyone who sacrifices for others gets a pass with me.

Military personnel, same deal. I let a carload of camo-clad gents go about two weeks ago on US 80; they were headed to Ft. Benning from somewhere.

Stopped them for 79 in a 55, walked up to the car, D/L insurance etc… asked the young man driving if he was active duty or reserves, he said he was active duty Army, asked him for his ID, which he displayed.

Told him to have a nice day and please drive safely.

I also don’t give lawyers tickets, why you ask?

Why set your self up for a guaranteed court fight from hell.



On the flip side, good-looking women will get tickets from me in the blink of an eye, why you ask?

Most of your complaints will and do come from folks your let off on a warning, in fact all of mine have. Good-looking women who get the pass, some not all but some will tell others who will convince them or maybe they convinced themselves, the only reason I stopped them was the fact she was hot, notwithstanding the fact she was doing 65 in a school zone.

It broke my heart one night while working Atlanta South, made a traffic stop and the car was occupied by two very attractive W/F, both young, both very well built.

Driver worked for a popular strip club on the south side of ALT.

She got cited for the stop, plus she had no license on her so her friend was made to drive after she was tested roadside for alcohol. Her friend was also cited for not wearing her seat belt.


Don't believe me, ask any GA State Trooper, it was their study which showed this level of warning verses complaints.

SMMAssociates
December 6, 2004, 09:02 PM
JD:

Without defending the practice, would you want to write a guy for five or ten over who may be the one you need to pull your backside out of the fire next week?

Where this goes sour is when it's not just speed or a similar infraction, but is a DUI or something like that.

Funny thing, and this is IMHO, but it may be the trial lawyers.... Time was when you found a citized DUI, you locked up his car and drove him home. Or if you caught a friend's kid, you cleaned him up and got him home....

Today, that car you parked gets a scratch (Lord help you if you drive it for him), or the kid's hair gets frizzy, and you're in the courts for a year.... So you tow the car and take the citizen (or the kid) to the greybar, and keep another set of lawyers off welfare.... But if it's another LEO, you may be willing to take the chance.

Off-duty LEO's are supposed to obey traffic laws. On-Duty, there are some exceptions. Being human, they screw up sometimes. Other LEO's - particularly from their own or neighboring departments - are going to cut them a lot more slack.

As I've said before, as a rent-a-cop, I don't give tickets, I get 'em. But this still doesn't bother me. I've been out there.... I don't want to hear about LEO's stealing things (happened around here) and other forms of corruption, but getting stopped usually does the "education" thing.

Some years ago the OH Turnpike was cursed by a fluke in the new speed limits - wherever it crossed through a city the speed limit had to be 55. Otherwise, it was 65. Signs were posted, but were kind of "out of nowhere", and easy to miss. OSP, being truly :evil: , enforced the lower limit. One afternoon they caught a buddy of mine who was ex-MCSO and ex-DEA, and who'd missed the sign. They took him into some burg's SO or PD to post bond (that's not done anymore if you're an OH resident) and everybody in the building razzed him for getting caught. Then they razzed the OSP guys for bringing him in....

(He eventually paid the fine, btw. You have to hold his wife and children as hostages to get a Trooper to pull a ticket. That really is as it should be.)

(Note to OSP.... You're doing a difficult job. I may kid about it, but I still appreciate it.)

Weasel: I see that you've replied while I was typing this. I agree 100% If you happen to run into Bruce Bugg (he was working HazMat & Motor Vehicle enforcement at the office near ATL last time I heard from him) tell him I said hi. (Might be wise to be armed and prepared to run, but that's another story.)

Regards,

jdkelly
December 6, 2004, 09:03 PM
TheFederlistWeasal,

Thanks for the information, it's an interesting look into to a world I'm not familar with.

Your story about the guys heading for Benning reminided me of a story.

The jist or which was four new Airborne troops in an old unregistired Comet just leaving the base get pulled over by a BIG BIG LEO. He leans his huge head into the drivers side window and says (straight out of the TV commerical) "you in a heap of trouble boy" cussed out the driver staired us all down and then told the driver "You get this !@## car back on post". He did!


Respectfully,

jdkelly

jdkelly
December 6, 2004, 09:09 PM
SMMAssociates,

I was neither advocating nor defending the practice. I'm not a LEO so I can't really understand the dynamics of that situation. I've often wondered what the thought process was, and with TheFederalistWeasel's post I saw a chance to ask.

Respectfully,

jdkelly

Michigander
December 6, 2004, 09:58 PM
Your curiosity, no matter how strong, is not a reason violate your neighbor's privacy.Well, unless there's money to be made on TV :scrutiny:

Greg L
December 6, 2004, 10:46 PM
Art:
Kids are easy. Mine once got fussy about his spinach. So, "Hey, son, if you don't eat your spinach, you can't go to bed." Turned out that he actually sorta liked spinach...

:confused: Can't go to bed or can (typo). Mine would be happy if I told them that they couldn't go to bed until they ate their spinach, they would probably sit there all night continuing to mess around. However being sent to bed at 6:30 on a summer's evening when their buddies are waiting for them to come back outside .... :evil: .

Greg

Art Eatman
December 7, 2004, 09:04 AM
Greg, he knew about other kids being sent to bed early. I caught him with the reverse twist on the deal, messing with his mind. :) Rules must be enforced with consistency, but how they're enforced is another matter entirely.

Art

Greg L
December 7, 2004, 10:33 AM
Gotcha thanks.

Yep, lots of psych warfare going on here too :evil: .

Greg

tyme
December 7, 2004, 11:15 AM
TFW, I understand the practical reasons for not writing certain people tickets, but I think it's a terrible policy. It creates a "special people" class, in this case, people the cops want to be on friendly terms with. Lawyers, firemen, active military. Then there's "everyone else." And then there are "bad people who often complain," who always get tickets (or written warnings).

Cops don't like it when we non-cops label them because of the actions of "bad" cops, yet that's exactly what some of those same cops do when they selectively give tickets. All hot women are going to complain if you don't ticket. All lawyers and firemen are going to exact vengeance on you for a traffic ticket if they can. If not all, why are you justified in your discrimination against certain people, but I'm not justified in being non-cooperative with cops? A cop who stops me is just doing his/her job until they prove otherwise, right? Well, that hot young thing you gave a ticket, or the lawyer you didn't ticket... they were just driving along minding their own business, too. You certainly don't know that the former will file a complaint, or that the latter will make your life Hell in court.

Michigander
December 7, 2004, 11:56 AM
And how does a cop know someone is a lawyer? Do the lawyers make it obvious somehow, like their business card shows when they get their ID or something? A special license plate? A sticker in the rear window?

sm
December 7, 2004, 12:15 PM
Private citizen here.

Red lights flash, pull over , jump out raise hood ,exclaim " accelerator linkage stuck" . You can get by with that about two or three times. Eventually " son, that linkage is always getting stuck on this stretch of road...yes the other officers and I do communicate". :D

Fast forward some years and you know, have known a few LEOs and some undercover. [have assisted with some things] UC sees Blue Lights flashing , stops, tells the officer " his accelerator linkage stuck he is good". Younger officer is scratching head -"in a fuel injected truck? " :D

Tom Servo
December 7, 2004, 12:45 PM
Weasel, there's a good chance we may have met. Were you APD or county? I used to work 3rd shifts for QT all around Division 2 and 5, as well as Riverdale and Tara blvd areas. When I got transferred up to Woodstock, I practically kissed the ground :)

I'm going to forward this to a few of my friends and print out a couple of copies for the officers that work my shift. There's no way I could do your job for $35k/yr and remain sane or honest. Stay safe!

confinedbythecurtain
December 7, 2004, 02:29 PM
If you want to get out of a ticket, dont break the law in the first place

Amen to that. It really pisses me off when idiots dont yield to LEOs or Fire/EMT.

LawDog
December 7, 2004, 08:25 PM
I'd like to add: Unless your best buddy/drinking pal/cubicle mate/stranger on the train has a bar card, or can show you a Law School diploma, don't take his legal advice to heart.

Yes, a deputy sheriff can write a ticket anywhere in the county he likes - including the Interstate.

Yes, a Highway Patrol Trooper can arrest you inside the city limits.

No, the court does not tear up all your tickets and warrants on your 18th birthday.

If I've been chasing you with lights and sirens on for the last mile, and you manage to jump up on your porch before I get my paws on you, I am not going to stop, turn around and go downtown to get a arrest warrant.

Breath mints don't cover up the smell of alcohol.

Refusing to blow in the Breathalyzer does not mean the cops don't have a case. And we're not going to let you walk out of the jail, either.

In a similar vein, any legal tricks protrayed by Hollywood either on the evening TV dramas, or on the big screen should probably be run by a real lawyer before you attempt them, in particular:

Punching your wife in the mouth in front of the cops and then putting up your hands will result in a butt-kicking in the Real World.

Threats are not covered under your First Amendment rights. In the Real World hissing threats of dire bodily injury to someone else while being handcuffed will result in extra charges showing up at your arraignment.

Threatening the arresting officer's family with rape, serious bodily injury and/or death while being handcuffed will also result in extra charges, and if you try to tell the arraigning judge that the First Amendment applies, she's going to make fun of you in public.

In Texas, the cops are not "required to negotiate" with hostage takers. If you come out of a house holding your sister-in-law hostage, we will shoot your ass first chance we get. Deal with it. And I don't think that cops in California are "required to negotiate" either -- I think you got lucky that time.

LawDog

HEiST
December 7, 2004, 08:33 PM
Breath mints don't cover up the smell of alcohol.

Of course not, silly, that's what peanut butter cups are for.

Tom Servo
December 7, 2004, 08:45 PM
Breath mints don't cover up the smell of alcohol.
Of course, that's not what I tell the drunks who come through on a Saturday night. They seem to think that menthol cigarettes and half a pack of Doublemint will let them cruise right through the roadblock down the street. Who am I to shatter their precious illusions? :p

Same goes for patchouli (sp?) incense and pot. I love it when the 19-year-old hippies come through, reeking of incense and stale pot. "Hey, there's cops out, you got any Visine?" Yeah sure, they're not going to notice the dilated pupils or watering eyes.

Very frequently, the local police will go ahead and pull folks over and conduct the field-tests in our parking lot. It's pure cinema watching some of them. The plain fact is, if you fail the first one, you're not going to make friends with the officer by insisting he put you through the whole battery.

Oh, and that German Shepherd? He's not sniffing at your car to make friends. :)

LiquidTension
December 8, 2004, 12:39 AM
Don't forget this advice: "Don't speed up to avoid an accident. Just let the guy hit you, otherwise we'll write you a ticket for speeding."

Yes, it happened to me.

SMMAssociates
December 8, 2004, 01:32 AM
Don't forget this advice: "Don't speed up to avoid an accident. Just let the guy hit you, otherwise we'll write you a ticket for speeding." Painfully, that actually is good advice, but you really should try to avoid the accident anyway. As a rent-a-cop, I really don't want to say "we", but somebody may get you on that too if possible....

Actually, the problem with speeding up is that it may be impossible to prove that you were avoiding an accident. The Officer that sees you a few seconds later may never know, and may not respond well to that sort of excuse.

Most states will have laws that favor citing a motorist who could have avoided an accident, but didn't.... You kind of have to park in the middle of an intersection to learn about this, but it happens.

I don't know about the speeding ticket, but I think I'd rather have that than take a chance on the other guy's car being a better battering ram, not to mention the hassle factor of getting a car fixed, etc. :eek:

firearms_instructor
December 8, 2004, 03:28 PM
Why is it that creeps like that can have an unending supply of girlfriends, but I can't find one to save my soul from the Devil???

Yeah, but who's to say that the girls who choose to be with crackhead creep are worth having?

Remember, you just haven't found her YET. She might be just around the corner.

Cheers!

TheFederalistWeasel
December 8, 2004, 04:05 PM
Yeah, but who's to say that the girls who choose to be with crackhead creep are worth having?

Remember, you just haven't found her YET. She might be just around the corner.

Cheers!


I agree but I too have seen many rather beautiful girls with some of the dirtiest scumbags you’ve ever seen.

I just locked up a beautiful lady, just 22 years old for possession of marijuana and I KNOW, I JUST KNOW it was not hers but her skinny, zit ridden, tattoo covered, punk@$$ boyfriend.

But when I found it, it was in her purse or bag and she told me it was hers. I looked at her, looked at him and said yeah, whatever.

When we got both down to booking I had to get all up in his face for yelling at her, bitch do this bitch do that, call yo mama and you better bail my ass outta her.

Every time he said something she would jump, I finally took her up front to the Investigations conference room. Bought her a soda and candy bar and gave her a phone, told her to call whomever she needed talk in private as long as she wanted that she would be O.R. bonded anyway, for her just to have someone come a pick her up.

I see this a lot and it puzzles me and kinda makes me wonder if I’m the one doing it all wrong. I have been told more times than I care to remember that I’m too nice.

*** is that?



:confused:

SMMAssociates
December 8, 2004, 04:41 PM
Weasel:

You're doing it right....

For some reason, I remember being a teenager (I'll count that 22-year-old as one), at 58, although my wife doesn't, nor do many of my friends.

There is something going on here - hormonal, drugs, drug side effects, whatever, that seems to bind kids together, and to help them make incredibly stupid decisions for reasons they probably can't articulate.

(My wife can't quite deal with our 18-year-old daughter, who's living with my little sister in another town now, attending college. Amicable move, btw.)

Sometimes we have to set a good example and just be there to catch them if they didn't notice. Eventually they reach maturity if they're lucky and Darwin doesn't get 'em.

A friend of mine, who's the PIO at the Township PD, once complained about a citizen reading him off for cuffing a DUI kid. The usual "why aren't you out there arresting real criminals?" thing. His response, as would be mine, was that he was trying to keep this kid alive, which is a lot more important than dealing with the "real criminals" boosting a car stereo or whatever. "We'll get them eventually; this is necessary now."

Maybe that kid will go home and straighten out his act. Or not.... But, for now, he's got the choice, and some of those "programs" that the PD's work with (we've got a good alcohol/drug program here for kids) may do the job.

(They used to have a diversion program run by two little girls. It worked pretty well, but I think boys were getting themselves into the program just to look at them.)

(I sure thought about it :what: . Kinda like two Jessica Simpson clones....)

Time was the Officer on the beat would put things right, help the kids straighten out, find the missing cat, etc. Today we tend to run from call to call and barely have time to know where the coffee and restroom stops are. All those "Community Oriented" buzzword things either don't work at all or run out of money. Nobody wants to pay for the kind of saturation we used to have, and it sure seems that the crimes are a lot nastier, too, in many cases.

But we still try.... When you quit feeling like trying, it's time to hang it up.

Clean97GTI
December 9, 2004, 01:42 AM
My grandfather (LAPD 25 years and LVMPD crime lab 20 more) had a great response anytime somebody gave him a line about filling a quota (traffic tickets).

He'd say "Naw, I don't have a quota, they told me I could write as many tickets as I want! Have a nice day"

SMMAssociates
December 9, 2004, 01:59 AM
He'd say "Naw, I don't have a quota, they told me I could write as many tickets as I want! Have a nice day" My kinda guy....

A friend of mine was a pro at "Press firmly, you're signing five copies", but I don't think he used that one.

Weasel: Just happened to think. One of the things I learned in my mis-spent youth on CompuServe is that the missing socks are actually sacrificed to Revolvo-Lavo, the god of the washing machine agitator. If you don't put an extra in there for him, he'll just take one....

There's also a god of the right front hubcap. I discovered that while teaching my daughter to drive. For some reason we always ended up on roads with no shoulder, a little traffic, and a car about as wide as Rhode Island.... (Well, not really, but when she went to the State's required driving school, they used a Ford Focus. Got her into a Taurus and she kind of got lost in it. We started with a Town Car - she couldn't see the fenders. Too far away.... At least she passed. She was very nervous, but when the kid ahead of her totally screwed up the maneuvering test - kinda like parallel parking but harder - she relaxed enough to ace it.)

Clean: See if your grandfather knows Dennis Cobb. Then ask Dennis what happened when he stepped off a curb in London.

Regards,

Zach S
December 10, 2004, 10:44 AM
Red lights flash, pull over , jump out raise hood ,exclaim " accelerator linkage stuck" . You can get by with that about two or three times. Eventually " son, that linkage is always getting stuck on this stretch of road...yes the other officers and I do communicate". Thats one of the last lines I'd use for the simple fact its over-used from what I understand. I actually did use it once, it was about 0300 on a Sunday morning. He had the perfect plan to catch me in a lie. He told me to start the car. The tach had swung up to about 6 grand before and the valves were floating by the time I turned it back off. First words out of his mouth were "Well, thats a first..."

He held the flashlight while I un-stuck it. I fixed it properly the next day.

"why aren't you out there arresting real criminals?" One of my favorite responses is "We dont have time because of the speeders/drunks/drag racers/whatever taking up all our time."

Don't forget this advice: "Don't speed up to avoid an accident. Just let the guy hit you, otherwise we'll write you a ticket for speeding." Sorry, not happening. I have been stopped once for avoiding an accident. Had I thought about an exit stratagy, I probably could have thought of a better one, however it would have been after I hit the kid. I didn't think, I reacted. Though I didnt speed up, the time I got stopped was when a kid on a bike rode into my lane (two-lane w/ center turn lane) and I swerved to miss. The officer was coming towards me in the other lane as I slid through the turn lane. He quickly turned around to stop me, I already had my signal on to turn into a parking lot. When he got to the window and after the usual exchange, I told him what happened. He took my word for it because he did notice a kid on a bike, but a fish-tailing Fairmont is a pretty good distraction... I dont know if he usually worked in this area or not (or if he still does), if so theres no telling how many times he saw me not doing something stupid so that may have had a hand in it.

The second time I did speed up. Have no idea how fast I was going when I lifted. Someone was coming down the Brevard Rd on-ramp onto I-240W, and theres no merging lane for it. None. Here comes this little blue car flying down the ramp and the driver seemed to be determined to get the spot I was in, it was clear in front of me, congested behind me and the hammer was occupied, so I punched it. The white Crown Vic behind me that I had been wondering about did turn out to be an un-marked car. Dude in the little blue car cut off a cop. Guess who got stopped:evil:

Now, I'm always in the hammer when I go through there.

SMMAssociates
December 10, 2004, 02:12 PM
The second time I did speed up. Have no idea how fast I was going when I lifted. Someone was coming down the Brevard Rd on-ramp onto I-240W, and theres no merging lane for it. None. Here comes this little blue car flying down the ramp and the driver seemed to be determined to get the spot I was in, it was clear in front of me, congested behind me and the hammer was occupied, so I punched it. The white Crown Vic behind me that I had been wondering about did turn out to be an un-marked car. Dude in the little blue car cut off a cop. Guess who got stopped I can't tell you how many times similar things have happened to me on I-85 around Greenville & Spartanburg SC. If I stay in the left lane, somebody (usually a BIG truck) wants me to move over. If I stay in the right lane, that little blue car (well, it's usually a big rusty pickup but....) is there all the time. :eek:

I never got stopped for it, but one of my cars had an aftermarket cruise control in it. Similar to the design that Ford was still using on the '89 Town Car I got rid of in '99. No idea what Ford did in my "new" (it began it's life as a rental in Orlando; there are still suntan lotion stains on the seatbelts!) TC - I'm still looking for the engine. At some point the chain that they used to move the throttle got stuck somehow, and could hold the throttle in "high speed" mode. I disconnected it about the second time, but I gave the car to my brother-in-law to detail pre-sale and he re-attached it! Once.... :evil:

Fortunately, no damage done either by myself or my BIL, nor did we exceed the posted limits by enough to encourage a passing LEO, but that time I removed some other parts so it wouldn't happen again.

I haven't been in SC for about ten years, which probably makes SLED happy....

If you enjoyed reading about "Letter to the public from an Officer" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!