Any sage advice on calling coyotes?


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Horsesense
December 13, 2004, 01:42 AM
The coyotes are getting pretty bold, one came in my yard the other A.M. with 4 dogs barking their heads off, it has come back two or three more mornings in the last week, I think it was trying to get the yorky my wife takes out every morning and my cows will begin calving in about eight weeks, so I want to get rid of this particular one. I'm thinking of setting up in my back yard and shooting out the window, so I can be sure to get the bold one.

My question, if I set up and call and they don’t come before I go to work, will they be more likely to show up later in the morning to see what the noise was all about?

I only have one outside dog (a golden retriever) but he has set up a mutual support grope with the neighbors dogs and between the fore of them they made a ruckus and ran the coyote off that one morning but the coyote has learned that if it waits until my neighbor goes to work, all the dogs follow him to the black top (about a mile) and he has free run of the area while the dogs are gone. I suspect the coyote eats the dog food from my neighbor's carport from time to time.

One good thing that has developed out of thins is the wife now packs a pistol when she takes the dog out.

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Art Eatman
December 13, 2004, 08:18 AM
I'm a bit dubious about danger to a calf from a coyote. They tend to avoid 1,000 pounds of irate mother love.

"My question, if I set up and call and they don’t come before I go to work, will they be more likely to show up later in the morning to see what the noise was all about?"

They check what they consider their territory as they search for food. I'd think they're more likely to show up to check for any dog food than as a result of earlier calling. Coyotes will wander anywhere they don't associate with danger, and they're inquisitive, as are all predators.

FWIW: A buddy of mine was told that if he'd go on and feed the coyotes near his house, they wouldn't yodel and bark and harass the dogs in the outside pen. He started feeding both table scraps and dog food. The coyotes started coming in about an hour before sundown, enjoying the free meals. Quite a show; as many as five would come to dinner. One made a habit of bedding down across the creek, waiting until the food was set out.

The coyotes are so fat they've darned near quit hunting. Cottontails everywhere! The jackrabbit population is growing. And my buddy gets a good night's sleep--unless he forgets to put out food...

:), Art

Greybeard
December 13, 2004, 08:53 AM
If coyotes are going to come to a call, they'll typically do it within the first several minutes, the smarter ones from downwind. It sounds like they may show up whether you call them or not - at a time of their convenience, not yours. Art's food scrap idea might could change that.

' Got a buddy who runs several hundred head of cattle up in extreme northern TX Panhandle. His major problems with the coyotes is when they tag-team Mama cows' backsides while down to drop a calf.

When up there pheasant hunting a week or so ago, we helped him put a portable pen up around a cow that was down with bad hip. Hip got that way after bull mounted her and her feet slipped in very muddy environment. Buddy said it happens semi-often and the mama cows typically recover - if he can get to 'em with water and hay before they get real weak and the coyotes find 'em.

Horsesense
December 13, 2004, 09:05 PM
Thanks guys, that's pretty much what I figured but I didn’t want to make matters worse. I future that the only time a calf is vulnerable is when momma gets off by herself to have the calf and is in the process of delivering.

With cattle you learn to expect the unexpected, last year I had a newborn take off like a rabbit, threw the fence and gone… I guess he knew I was fixen to make him a steer, I had to turn momma loose and she went and got him. Later in the year a mud turtle tried to nurse off the same cow.

Kingcreek
December 13, 2004, 10:30 PM
In my experience, coyotes will dog a cow ready to calf but I think it's mostly for the placenta. They love to eat that afterbirth stuff. I think this is what's responsible for all the stories about coys taking calves. If momma doesn't pay close attention to junior they will take whatever they can get away with including a new calf. Give him enough time to get his legs and the situation changes.
Calls work great sometimes and not at all others. Bait may be better in your situation (if legal). consistant timing will pattern them to your schedule.
My favorite coyote call of all time is an old PS Olt bite call that can sound a medium volume rabbit squeal down to a subtle mouse squeak if you bite down on the flat reed.
Forgot to add: The cats and small dogs or puppies are in danger. (live bait!)

Shanghai McCoy
December 14, 2004, 07:58 PM
Some years back I took my then young pup of a Golden retriever with us on an evening duck hunt.While I was in the water putting out the dekes she got to whining and fussing.Next thing we hear is kiyotes howling and barking close by.I kept her real close the rest of that hunt...

Cindog
December 16, 2004, 03:08 PM
Any chance any of your dogs or the dogs in the neighborhood are in heat?

Ol' Badger
December 17, 2004, 09:10 AM
Well what works for me is this: Fall asleep. Yup. Every coyote I shot happens when I wake up from a Deer Hunt. Sad, but true! I have a nice peaceful dairy to hunt and no one around, except lots of cats which is what I think the coyotes eat. Well thats my .02 and have a good day.

Horsesense
December 17, 2004, 01:22 PM
Any chance any of your dogs or the dogs in the neighborhood are in heat?

Nope
That is a good thought though

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