New Service cylinder unscrewing from yoke?


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Gordon
January 11, 2005, 11:41 PM
I started having trouble closing the cylinder on a Colt New Service. It moves back away from the yoke when cylinder is out of battery and I must align cylinder carefully to close it other wise it hangs up ! It looks like the cylinder revolves on a tube which has come unscrewed from cylinder , this seems not connected to ejection rod or extractor star which work normally. How can I fix it? :confused:

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P95Carry
January 12, 2005, 12:07 AM
I am clueless on Colts! But with Smiths, if the ejector rod comes unscrewed a bit then cyl very reluctant to seat home... it's as if star is ''proud'' and gets in way of easy closure.

Check and see if yours is unscrewed at all ... all I can think of for now. These threads on a Smith need locktited usually.

Gordon
January 12, 2005, 12:01 PM
Nope, as I said, star is tight and rod is tight on it, the cylinder spins on a 'tube' , the tube is tight but the cylinder backs off the 'tube' which my other New Services don't.

P95Carry
January 12, 2005, 01:04 PM
Sorry Gordon ... can't help any further ... only Colt I had was a Trooper MkIII 20 years ago.! But there are some very savvy Coilt guys here so ... here's hoping.

dfariswheel
January 12, 2005, 03:54 PM
Take a look at the cylinder stop on the lower frame.

This is simply a projection, made as part of the sideplate that acts as a stop to prevent the cylinder from moving back when it's open.

S&W's solution to this is a separate round stud.

Often on older guns, the Colt stop lug can be worn by use or over-buffing during a re-blue.

In any event, open the cylinder and check the interface between the rear edge of the cylinder versus the rectangular lug on the lower side plate.

Likely, something is out of spec, and the cylinder is over-riding the stop lug.

Unfortunately, about the only "fix" is very careful welding and refinishing of the lug and sideplate.

Gordon
January 12, 2005, 05:06 PM
Yes I see what you mean , however this 'tube' deal the cylinder revolves on seems not 'screwed' (?) onto the cylinder like the other New Services I have and does let the cylinder come back and over ride the 'stop' projection on frame. This gun just started doing this after about a 1000 rounds, it just came back from Cylinder and Slide for a COMPLETE and I mean COMPLETE over haul. Thank Ferris! Is this 'tube deal ' supposed to be screwed onto the inside of cylinder and act like a bearing ? :)

dfariswheel
January 12, 2005, 08:57 PM
I'm not sure what you mean by "tube thing".

Do you mean the actual cylinder collar?
This is a thin collar that projects out from the middle of the cylinder about 3/16".

On Colt revolvers, the collar is made in one piece with the cylinder blank, it's not a factory press-in or separate piece.
The crane the cylinder rides on is slid down the center of the cylinder, and the collar stops against the recoil flange on the crane.

The Collar SHOULD be made in one piece with the cylinder, UNLESS the collar was machined off and replaced with a press-in collar to correct cylinder end shake.

Unassembled to the frame, you can just pull the cylinder backward, almost all the way off the crane.

When assembled, the only thing preventing the cylinder from moving back at least a certain distance IS the frame lug, and spring pressure from the ejector spring.

I'd suggest something is WRONG.
What it is, I can't say for sure without examining the gun.
Back to Cylinder & Slide. They'll correct whatever it is.

Gordon
January 12, 2005, 10:40 PM
Thanks; my guess is the 'press in' collar Cylinder and Slide put in is not 'pressed in ' anymore and allows just enough axial movement on the star end of the cylinder to override the frame lug. Back it goes. :mad:

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