Call 911 and die, with your necklace


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Monkeyleg
March 4, 2003, 11:19 PM
Assault victims can get alarms

West Allis police to be alerted when users are in danger of violence

By ANNYSA JOHNSON
anjohnson@journalsentinel.com

Last Updated: March 3, 2003

In a first for southeastern Wisconsin, some victims of domestic violence and rape in West Allis will have access to free alarms that will alert police when they are in danger, the West Allis Police Department is scheduled to announce today.

The program, developed by ADT Security Services Inc., is targeted at victims police believe are in imminent danger of assault. It's been implemented in 169 communities nationwide since 1992 and is credited with saving 35 lives, according to the company.

Dane County began offering the program in June 2001. But West Allis, which has taken significant steps to address domestic violence in the last year, is the first to offer it locally.

"We see it as a way to better serve victims and help assure their safety," said West Allis police Lt. Gregory Blaskowski, who oversees the department's sensitive crimes unit.

The executive director of Sojourner Truth House - which operates a domestic violence hotline and a shelter for battered women and their children, and provides treatment for abusers - lauded the program but cautioned that no single initiative can fully protect victims.

"There is no foolproof safety measure," said Kathie Stolpman. "Victims have to have other plans, other measures to convey to neighbors and family that they are in danger."

The ADT program, called AWARE - for Abused Women's Active Response Emergency - provides security units and alarm necklaces to victims police believe are in imminent danger from their abusers. Though it's been used most in domestic violence cases, Blaskowski said, the units also will be offered to victims in some rape cases.

He expects to distribute six to 10 units a year. However, ADT will make available as many as the department needs, said company spokeswoman Kathy Bartomeyer.

"We leave it up to the experts in the community to determine which people are at high risk. But there are three key things we look for: that the person is in imminent danger, they have a restraining order against the individual, and they agree to prosecute if that person is apprehended as a result of the system," she said.

West Allis police responded to 652 domestic violence calls in 2002, according to Blaskowski.

Over the last seven months, calls from West Allis police to the Sojourner Truth domestic violence hotline on behalf of victims accounted for about half of all of its calls from suburban departments. But Stolpman said that is an indication not of a greater problem there, but of the Police Department's concerted efforts to address it.

"They are showing real leadership on this issue," said Stolpman, whose organization has operated the hotline since 1986.

"Domestic violence is happening in every community. But many times, people are reluctant to involve the police."

According to Blaskowski, West Allis aggressively enforces the state law requiring mandatory arrest in domestic abuse cases. In addition, he said, the department in August hired an advocate for abuse victims with federal grant dollars and is putting its 135 patrol officers through special training to help them better understand the problems associated with the crime.

"One of the questions they have is why the women don't leave," Blaskowski said.

"Well, 75 percent of women who are killed by their partners are killed after they've left or are getting ready to. That's one reason," he said.


A version of this story appeared in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on March 4, 2003.

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Standing Wolf
March 4, 2003, 11:39 PM
"We leave it up to the experts in the community to determine which people are at high risk. But there are three key things we look for: that the person is in imminent danger, they have a restraining order against the individual, and they agree to prosecute if that person is apprehended as a result of the system," she said.

This is a good thing, but if anyone were stalking and/or threatening me, I'd have a lot more faith in a .357 magnum revolver.

Airwolf
March 5, 2003, 12:35 AM
I forgot who posted this demonstration concept for convincing someone which is more valuable, a gun or a cell phone (or in this case a panic transmitter).

Unload and verify your weapon is empty.

Place your weapon on the table in front of the “victim”.

Place a cell phone on the table next to your weapon.

Pick up the largest knife the “victim” has in their kitchen.

Raise the knife in a threatening manner and move toward them.

Ask them “Which object in front of you is more valuable right now?” "Which one are you going to use to protect yourself?"

Anyone who says “cell phone” is in need of a major beating with a clue-by-four.

sanchezero
March 5, 2003, 12:53 AM
My favorite is how they repeatedly use the term 'victim'...

"We see it as a way to better serve victims and help assure their safety,"

"Victims have to have other plans"

DUDE! If they're victims, they weren't safe and none of their plan worked.

:uhoh:

Interesting how they assume everyone is a victim ahead of time...

I'd like to think that if I were attacked I'd be standing over some victims of my own. But, then, my 'other plans' don't include a 911 speed dialer :rolleyes: .

pax
March 5, 2003, 02:05 AM
I dunno. If I were being stalked and were suddenly attacked, I'm pretty sure I would want a necklace that told the cops to come pick up the body.

His.

pax

I declare to you that woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself, and there I take my stand. -- Susan B. Anthony

S_O_Laban
March 5, 2003, 02:47 AM
Pax, LOL, that's using the "ole noodle":D :D

Triad
March 5, 2003, 03:11 AM
pax, I like your take on it, but I'd only want one if it meant I could just leave it with the body and go home.

sm
March 5, 2003, 03:13 AM
Sis finally moved herself and kids out of DV situation. Filed R/O, and hopefully will use SA. Firearms not allowed in the "Residence of Safety". Course her firearm was pawned for dope by hubby. OC spray and air horn in use now. Maybe she'll wise up.

ADT really tried a hard sell on my Mom, I attended this hard sell. Fact is ADT is in another State. Sales Rep didn't like my bringing that up. Mom has a Shotgun, cell phone and an air horn...My comment about 'why should the alarm go off in another state then you call 911 in Mom's State...waste of time and $". Dunno, figure Mom can call -landline/cell-before or after the shotgun goes off...quicker and no monthly fees. Mom's good with a shotgun.

Bro installs "lifelines' , those for medical reasons, like if fall and can't reach the phone...ok maybe, I still think speed dial and wearing on body a cell just as good.

No 911 growing up. We took it upon ourselves to be safe. Firearms, rotary phone to call neighbors...we knew our neighbors back then.

Still think its personal responsibility...

BigG
March 5, 2003, 03:57 PM
A plan is a list of things that don't happen.

Leatherneck
March 5, 2003, 04:04 PM
Triadpax, I like your take on it, but I'd only want one if it meant I could just leave it with the body and go home.
You mean sort of a "Bag 'em and Tag 'em" kind of thingy?:D

TC
TFL Survivor

Boats
March 5, 2003, 08:35 PM
A plan is a list of things that don't happen.

DV victims need to take up "The Way of the Gun.":D

Kobun
March 5, 2003, 09:03 PM
They use a bunch of these "security alarms" here in Norway.
When the button is pushed, the police will know down to a few meters where the victim is.
Don't know if anyone has ever been saved by one though...

Would probably be better to put these women through some kind of skul.

The first thing they should learn is to not fall for the wrong kind of man. Again and again and again and.... :rolleyes:

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?s=&postid=43854

Kahr carrier
March 5, 2003, 09:07 PM
I like my Panic transmitter its call Glock 21 it will make 13 calls.:neener:

Chuck Perry
March 5, 2003, 09:08 PM
There is a program here locally in Pittsburgh that distributes refurbished deactivated cell phones to battered women. Deactivated cells are able to reach 911 free of charge. This is much better than activating an alarm to have an out of state third party call your local police.

XLMiguel
March 6, 2003, 12:04 AM
Common Sense 101: A gun in hand beats a cop on the phone every time.

Repeat after me: "A gun in hand beats a cop on the phone every time." Repeat 100 times or until you 'get it'.

Alternatively: It's OK to dial 9-1-1 with one hand while you hold your 1911 in the other.

TarpleyG
March 6, 2003, 03:09 PM
I think a Kel-Tec P32 has a necklace setup similar to this. Better option IMO. Pushing a button of a different kind. Anyone else?

GT

geekWithA.45
March 6, 2003, 03:43 PM
No firearms in the "residence of safety"

This makes me sick.

There is never a good reason to disarm a probable victim.

Any "logic" that follows the trail of "this person is in danger, and therefore might panic and USE their sidearm" is perverse, and twisted.

Panic is a possibility, under any circumstances, and is insufficient reason.

I suppose they count on battered women to use reason in the face of imminent violence, or the conflict management skills they just learned in the workshop.

blades67
March 6, 2003, 03:51 PM
I dunno. If I were being stalked and were suddenly attacked, I'm pretty sure I would want a necklace that told the cops to come pick up the body.

His.

Or hers. Depends on who is being stalked.

critter
March 6, 2003, 05:19 PM
In times of danger, a personal alarm can be quite helpful-especially if it has a built in light. It needs, however, to be loud enough to be heard by neighbors so they can dial 911 in case the intended victim can not.

My favorite personal alarm for female family members is quite loud and lights up quite nicely when activated: a Ruger SP 101 2 1/2" .357 Magnum loaded with 125 gr JHP.

Mark D
March 6, 2003, 06:29 PM
Appropriate tools for a restraining order violation...

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