Two Enfields before bed, will call in the morning.


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Oleg Volk
February 13, 2005, 04:14 AM
Trying to get back onto daylight schedule...so I am off to bed after this.

http://www.olegvolk.net/gallery/albums/arms/notovandalism.sized.jpg

http://www.olegvolk.net/gallery/albums/arms/betterthan911.sized.jpg

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QuarterBoreGunner
February 13, 2005, 04:30 AM
I like the first one better; it's more accessible I think for the majority of people. ‘.303’ may be lost on a lot of folk.

homeka45
February 13, 2005, 07:00 AM
As always, :) visually arresting and to the point.

thorn726
February 13, 2005, 07:07 AM
holy right on!
extremely perfect

Oleg Volk
February 13, 2005, 07:11 AM
I'll make a more mainstream 9-m-m vs. 9-1-1 version.

SapperLeader
February 13, 2005, 09:22 AM
I really like them both, though the first one is a little bit more mainstream. Number two I think is still fairly obvious though some people (including gun owners) may go "What’s a .303?". Great work on both, hope the inspiration continues with the awesome roll of posters you have done recently :D

DWS1117
February 13, 2005, 11:25 AM
I really like these. Terrific work. I'm in agreement with others. The .303 may be a little obscure, even for some gun people. Maybe .308, 30.06, or as you stated 9mm.

Any possibility of getting as higher resolution version of the first to use ad desktop wallpaper?

Halffast
February 13, 2005, 11:37 AM
Oleg,

How about for the second, if you can find a SA .45 that has 1911 printed on the side big enough for the photo to show it, doing a 1911 vs. 911?

David

Billll
February 13, 2005, 11:40 AM
If you're looking for a 3 digit mumber that everybody recognizes, how about .357? One of those compact 5-shot jobs will appeal to a hiker or traveler looking to keep the weight and volume down, too.

keyhole
February 13, 2005, 12:02 PM
Great job! Now get some well deserved rest.

4v50 Gary
February 13, 2005, 12:17 PM
I love that .303 works better than 911. In California, it should be "A reminder for cyclists" or "A reminder for joggers" as they seem to be included in the mountain's lion's food chain.

Oleg Volk
February 13, 2005, 01:02 PM
http://www.olegvolk.net/gallery/arms contains 2000x3000 versions of both images.

Scottmkiv
February 13, 2005, 02:03 PM
I love the second one, it is now my wallpaper. I do agree that the 303 reference is a little obscure for non-gunnies.

mustanger98
February 13, 2005, 06:23 PM
All this talk about .303 being obscure, I don't know. I wasn't always gunny, but .303 is famous in my part of the country.

SMLE
February 13, 2005, 06:50 PM
My license plate reads; "RULE303", so you can guess which one I like best.
Although the first one sums up by thoughts on "sporterizing" milsurps.

vmi93
February 13, 2005, 10:19 PM
The first is a little wordy; maybe "Some vandals destroy churches and works of art, others melt down historic arms. Preserve history; collect firearms."

The 2nd may work a little better in the UK and former Commonwealth nations. I think .303 may be the one caliber (like .45 or .30-30 here) that everyone knows about in those countries.

BlackCat
February 13, 2005, 11:34 PM
Smelter is lost on me. Smelt is a fish, so is that a smelt fisherman? ;)

Beetle Bailey
February 14, 2005, 12:00 AM
FWIW, I frequently get asked about my Enfields at the range and oftentimes the guy doesn't know what .303 Brit is. I usually have to say "Well, it kinda like a British version of a .30 cal. They used it in WWI and WWII." Otherwise, nice posters ;) .

Skunkabilly
February 22, 2005, 03:59 PM
I like the second one...funny as heck.

GTKrockeTT
February 22, 2005, 04:33 PM
good stuff, as always.

kikilee
February 22, 2005, 11:10 PM
The second one was my pick of the two.

HungSquirrel
February 22, 2005, 11:13 PM
Mr. Volk, let me just say that your artwork, your website, and your clearly articulated and reasonable views on the RKBA issue are part of the reason I am a gun owner today and 100% of the reason I have started actively supporting the issue on the internet.

As always, wonderful pictures.

campergeek
February 23, 2005, 12:02 AM
I love the first one - I'm going to hang it on my safe.

As for the second, while I like the sentiment I must say as a hiker and backpacker that I wouldn't carry my bulky Enfield along with me. I agree with the thought that .357 should be used instead of .303 - it's more recognizable and refers to a more portable arm.

Regardless, as always, great job Oleg!

Kurt S.
February 23, 2005, 01:43 PM
When the last rousing gallop is ended - and the last post and rail has been jumped
And a cracked neck that cannot be mended - shall have under the yew-tree been dumped..
Just you leave him alone in God's acre and drink in wine, whisky or beer,
"May the saints up above send The Breaker a horse like good old Cavalier."

I can't look at a Lee rifle without thinking about Breaker Morant. Even though they were using Lee-Metfords not Lee Enfields at the time of those events.

Great pictures as always, Oleg.

SMLE
February 23, 2005, 02:19 PM
I can't look at a Lee rifle without thinking about Breaker Morant. Even though they were using Lee-Metfords not Lee Enfields at the time of those events.My license plate says; "RULE303", so I know whaty ou mean.

BTW. Enfield rifling was adopted before the Boer war, so British troops had a mix of Magazine Lee Metfords and Magazine Lee Enfields.

For anyone not familar with the Lee rifles, "Metford" refers to the pattern of rifling originally adopted. The Metford rifling was not suitable for use with the hot burning cordite propellant, and a new rifling designed at RSAF Enfield was adopted to replace it.

Look for a book titled "Scapegoats of the Empire". It is the story upon which the movie "Breaker Morant" is based. Morant did indeed say "We got them and we shot them under rule 303!"

mustanger98
February 23, 2005, 06:31 PM
IIRC, while Enfield rifling is square grooves, Metford rifling is round/U-shaped grooves. Metford rifling was used for the .303 British Service round that used a 200-something grain cast lead bullet. Enfield rifling came about when the cordite and 174gr FMJ's were brought into service as SMLE was talking about.

Thinking about it, this evolution is not totally unlike our own '03 Springfields going from the .30-'03 cartridge to .30-06.

SMLE
February 23, 2005, 06:53 PM
You're right about the differance in the rifling, but off just a bit on the bullets. All service .303 had jacketed bullets. The round was designed for smokeless powder, but becuase of production issues, the first ammunition issued used a compressed black powder charge. Once the Cordite propellant was available, it was found that the extreme heat it produced was very erosive, particularly at the throat of the chamber. Cordite burns even hotter than regular nitro-cellulose powder, and you can see this for yourself if you fire 10 rounds of commercial ammo, and feel the barrel, then fire 10 rounds of Cordite ammo and feel the barrel. The Brits eventually adopted a nitro-cellulose loading for machine guns. Ammo that has this powder will be marked with the letter "z" as in MkVIIz (174grn FMJ), or MkVIIIz (180grn FMJBT) If a machine gun was fired with regular Cordite ammo, the barrel was supposed to be downgraded and not used for "overhead" fire unless in an emergency.

You can still sometimes find belted .303 "Z" ammo from time to time.

madkiwi
February 23, 2005, 07:06 PM
That's an "Ishy" screw in that rifle too.

Amazing history, still being made at Ishapore, India up until the late 1960s.

If I ever get my C&R license errors sorted out I will be buying more.

madkiwi

swingset
February 24, 2005, 04:50 AM
That's an "Ishy" screw in that rifle too.

Amazing history, still being made at Ishapore, India up until the late 1960s.


Too bad they took a Brit gun, and screwed it through to "strengthen" the stock. That Ishy screw devalues the gun, to a collector anyway.

Ishapore was still making No1 actions as late as 1987. They never made many No4's tho. The early 1920's Ishapores were made on Brit tooling and were very nice rifles. Some of the Ishies are not as nice as their brit counterparts, especially "bits" rifles that were cobbled together, but on the whole they are fine, serviceable rifles.

seeker_two
February 24, 2005, 07:45 AM
As usual, a job well done, Oleg....


...but, if going to bed, women are much more cuddly. ;)

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