What's the temperature of a fired bullet?


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41mag
February 21, 2005, 12:57 PM
& how much heat energy is lost in flight?

Say you had two fmj rounds.One a .357mag & the other a 7.62x51.

How hot is the bullets surface as it leaves the muzzle,& how does air friction affect its cooling?

&,if they are hot,why don't bullet holes cauterize themselves?

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R.H. Lee
February 21, 2005, 12:59 PM
That's a good question. Since a cast lead rifle bullet needs to be gaschecked the temperature is apparently enough to melt lead. How hot is that?

pignock
February 21, 2005, 01:14 PM
RileyMc asked: That's a good question. Since a cast lead rifle bullet needs to be gaschecked the temperature is apparently enough to melt lead. How hot is that?

The gas check keeps the combustion gasses from eroding the base of the bullet and leaving lead deposits in the barrel.

I don't use a thermometer when I cast but as near as I can remember, the melting temperature for unalloyed lead is somewhere around 600 to 700 degrees F.

The bullets, in the internal ballistics phase of projection, stay below this. I would guesstheir temp would not exceed half the melting temp.

Keith

Boats
February 21, 2005, 01:30 PM
Too hot to catch that's for sure. ;)

P95Carry
February 21, 2005, 01:37 PM
The one thing I think here is, the thermal coefficient of lead is low ... copper of course way higher. but, the very brief exposure to the - admittedly - very high flame temp at combustion time, will not IMO give enough ''time envelope'' to markedly allow for much temp gain.

The gas check deal - that is very much just taking care of bullet base ... a very thin section that might be softened - the remaining bullet mass will have inadequate time to conduct much. Some heat will be present I'd guess from friction too - but all this will hardly yield a significantly ''hot'' bullet. Warm probably at best.

Only my own 2c

fletcher
February 21, 2005, 02:07 PM
Yes, I can guarantee those gases are way over the melting temperature. However, as P95 said, there is not enough time for the heat to transfer far into the bullet. The simple fact that some of the lead on the back vaporizes shows that the temperature definitely exceeds the melting point. The bullet probably gains the vast majority of its thermal energy from friction with the barrel. And I imagine the bullet cools down relatively quickly once it leaves the barrel.

RON in PA
February 21, 2005, 02:09 PM
Since bullets are extruded through the bore I suspect that any temperature rise would be a combination of friction as well as the heat from the propellent combustion.

DRZinn
February 21, 2005, 03:41 PM
Even if the bullet didn't cool in flight, it wouldn't be in contact with the skin long enough to cauterize anything.

Stickjockey
February 21, 2005, 03:43 PM
Temperature aside, I'd guess the reason for bullets not cauterizing the wound has something to do with the combination of the bullet not being in contact with the tissue for a long enough time and the inherently dynamic nature of terminal ballistics.

41mag
February 21, 2005, 03:43 PM
O.K.,so the bullet gets a little from the propellant & a little from the bore.

What about the air as it flies through it?

fletcher
February 21, 2005, 03:55 PM
It probably gets most of its heat from the bore, but in flight, most likely loses nearly all of that heat in flight.

jsalcedo
February 21, 2005, 04:16 PM
Ever pick up a freshly fired bullet?

It is hot enough to have to toss it from hand to hand while it cools.

I would say for example a FMJ .45acp bullet temp would be around 160 degrees about 8 seconds after firing.

This is from me retrieving bullets that bounced off of target stands and steel plates. Not sure if the quick deformation adds heat.

I'm not sure if rifle bullets would be hotter or cooler.

HKrazy
February 21, 2005, 04:21 PM
I don't have all the answers to your questions but this info from Gem-Tech's web site might interest you:

Full Automatic Fire Issues:
Suppressors shown with or designed for machine guns are rated for fully automatic fire. In the case of suppressors designed for .223 (5.56mm), there are some limitations in the duration of fully automatic fire due to shortcomings in the ammunition, not the suppressor. 5.56mm is a unique cartridge. The projectile is physically small and lightweight. The relatively high muzzle velocity causes excessive barrel heating from friction, with outside barrel temperatures exceeding 700° F in a 100 round burst. Bore temperature is considerably higher. The projectile contains a small quantity of lead, which after a 90 round burst starts to soften and/or melt. The softening of the lead core results in geometric instability of the projectile, causing excessive yawing, tumbling, and suppressor baffle contact. These effects are not normally seen anywhere near this early in larger caliber projectiles, such as 7.62 NATO. Although the suppressor is capable of withstanding long bursts using ammunition not containing any lead, any lead containing 5.56mm ammunition will damage the suppressor. Because of the deleterious heating effect, most weapon manufacturers place serious limitations on sustained fully automatic fire and state that the barrel is ruined after a 200 round burst.

LINK (http://www.gem-tech.com/m4-96d.html).

carebear
February 21, 2005, 04:31 PM
<tough guy mode>

All mine end up at 98.6.....

At least for a while. ;)

</tough guy mode>

41mag
February 21, 2005, 04:38 PM
WOW!Thanks HKrazy.

200 round burst & then it's scrap!

P95Carry
February 21, 2005, 05:19 PM
I can certainly see sustained full auto becoming a problem - always wonder how GE mini-gun manages, even tho 6 barrels and some cooling time between each barrel's cycling.
Ever pick up a freshly fired bullet?I agree, a retrieved bullet can be quite hot. I tend to imagine much of that tho is by heat generated thru deformation.

I recall shooting an old gearbox ... still containing oil ... an old .303 milsurp penertrated the cast case easily and after that a very noticeable amount of smoke exited the hole! Seemed probably that the bullet had absorbed a considerable portion of the energy expended in punching thru, by deformation - and so darned hot.

Glock19Fan
February 21, 2005, 05:52 PM
I would guess the bullet would be almost as hot as the shell casing. Although the burning gun powder only reaches the base of the bullet, the friction from the bore and air will heat up it signifcantly as mentioned.

I remember hearing about supersonic airplanes having problems with their skins overheating from the friction from air alone, and IIRC, the temp was around 600 degress F. I think it would react the same with bullets.

P95Carry
February 21, 2005, 05:59 PM
Glock - the shell casing, being the primary containment for the combustion - and being brass which has quite a high thermal coefficient .... will get hot real easy.... and it is subjected to the temperature for a significant time, being the ''backstop'' against the bolt for the duration.

I have considered further re friction - and would venture to suggest that HV bullets, tavelling a long barrel will in fact probably get more than warm ... different from handgun situations.

Whilst the supersonic skin heating phenomenon is a fact - I'd think that ''flight time'' for the bullet - measured in fractions of a second for most part - would not allow for a great heat input - the copper jacket would heat quickest of course but the lead core would IMO still be lagging well behind on heat absorbtion.

Monkeyleg
February 21, 2005, 07:00 PM
We had a guy at a local indoor range shoot himself in the leg a few years ago. He was drawing from a holster and snagged the trigger somehow.

The bullet cauterized the wound channel. There was no blood.

Sleeping Dog
February 21, 2005, 07:47 PM
The bullet cauterized the wound channel

Maybe the muzzle flash and burning trousers cauterized the wound. No blood? Maybe all the blood was in his face from embarassment. :)

Two words come to mind: Ouch, and Doofus

Regards.

Sleeping Dog
February 21, 2005, 07:49 PM
Apologies for using the word "doofus". I realize personal attacks are not polite or helpful.

Again, apologies to any of you nine-toed fast-draw artists.

Regards.

41mag
February 21, 2005, 08:01 PM
Whilst the supersonic skin heating phenomenon is a fact - I'd think that ''flight time'' for the bullet - measured in fractions of a second for most part - would not allow for a great heat input - the copper jacket would heat quickest of course but the lead core would IMO still be lagging well behind on heat absorbtion.

Well,that seems to me to lead to another Q.

Consider calibers like 50BMG,338Lapua,heck even a 168grn .7.62x51 fired to targets at 1000M.Thev've got the flight time & IIRC the first two are still supersonic @ that range.

Does anyone else wonder if these first get hot from the propellant & bore friction,maybe cool off in the first couple of hundred feet & then heat up again as they absorb the friction heat from the long flight?

P95Carry
February 21, 2005, 08:03 PM
I know one thing Monkeyleg ... however wrong I may be in my assessment of bullet temp' - and I only theorize ... I shall resist the ultimate test - of shooting into any part of my anatomy!!! :p:D

Tho it might be only way to find out for sure! :uhoh: ;)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

maybe cool off in the first couple of hundred feet & then heat up again as they absorb the friction heat from the long flight?I was considering this aspect and yeah I guess marginall cooling followed by air friction heating ... but even so - time to target is gonna be not a huge lot over 1 second at the long range ... enough I wonder to really get the heat into the core?? Still not sure.

I guess there is probably some definitive test info out there somewhere - I am probably way off base without realizing - all theory and no proof!! :).

Selfdfenz
February 21, 2005, 08:15 PM
I googled up a pdf from a company that does infrared temperature measurment and in their test a 223 bullet printed at 267 degrees.

S-

P95Carry
February 21, 2005, 08:24 PM
Self' ... wonder at what point that was in flight.? However - time for me to eat humble pie as - I was most assuredly - WRONG - that's another screwed-up theory makes it to the trash!! :D

Selfdfenz
February 21, 2005, 08:33 PM
P95,

It was a lab test so I thinking it was a few feet at most. So I'm thinking when we are talking 267 degrees that is how hot the bullet is near the start of its flight.

The thing I really wonder about is "how much does the thing cool off in flight".
Assuming large caliber bullets have more mass they would cool more slowly than small ones, however but the thing is in flight such a short time, it can't cool much.

After all, being bullets one would think all the suff that makes them ballistically efficient and reduces drag also keeps the air from being a real wonderful heat sink.

Not being an engineer makes my head hurt to think about this stuff!

S-

P95Carry
February 21, 2005, 08:45 PM
Self' ... ah, pretty early on then - much as I imagined.

As for cooling in flight - I'd think we have a parallel to heat gain thru air friction, in a sense.

Basically, the time frame for loss or gain is so short. A small bullet having less mass will heat or cool faster - but OTOH it's surface area is smaller.... so that can affect temp loss or gain. At other extreme, a .50 cal has way more mass - and so IMO less likely to heat or cool as fast, but - it does have a greater surface area!

I am way too lazy to do the math here but there is, will be, a fairly easily derived math expression for caliber, length, density, temp coefficient etc ... such that we could probably derive a constant, or a definitive relationship of the variables.

I do tho still reckon heat gained... from powder combustion, will be perhaps seemingly quite modest - most just at base - but pretty sure the friction thru rifling engagement will be well significant. Interesting here tho is the fact that bullet surface temp might be high (jacket and outer core) ... but would not be at all surprised if at that early stage, bullet lead innermost core still almost cool.

Selfdfenz
February 21, 2005, 08:56 PM
"I do tho still reckon heat gained... from powder combustion, will be perhaps seemingly quite modest - most just at base - but pretty sure the friction thru rifling engagement will be well significant. Interesting here tho is the fact that bullet surface temp might be high (jacket and outer core) ... but would not be at all surprised if at that early stage, bullet lead innermost core still almost cool."

Friction from passing thru the barrel as the main heat source makes absolute sense to me. I hadn't thought about air friction as a heat source but at MACH 2+ thru MACH 3+ or so I bet it sure is.

S-

Selfdfenz
February 21, 2005, 09:00 PM
Now that I think of it...what makes the tracer round start tracing, the fact that it passed thru a ball of fire when it left the muzzle or the fact it got so hot on its way down the barrel? Having never been in the military I never had the benefit of an explanation but I'm thinking the latter.
Wonder what the ignition temp for tracer material is?

S-

P95Carry
February 21, 2005, 09:09 PM
No idea for specific ignition temp for tracer material but - believe that the powder burn flame front is all that is needed, on bullet base. Many incendiary tracer compositions tho do have a finite ''start-up'' time, meaning that visible trace may only be properly visible some 100 yds down range, and beyond, after fully ignited.

Jim K
February 21, 2005, 10:06 PM
Think a minute. If the friction in the barrel plus the temperature of the gas were enough to melt the bullet, no bullet would ever leave the barrel; only a blob of molten metal would come out. Yes, high temperatures can erode the base of a lead bullet enough to require gas checks to be used, but I have recovered dozens (if not hundreds) of bullets that had no sign of any melting of the lead or the core of a jacketed bullet.

Don't get confused by the melting of bullets which strike a steel plate or a rock. When that happens, all the bullet's kinetic energy is converted to heat in an instant; it is that heat that melts the bullet, not the heat from firing the bullet, which has long since dissipated.

FYI, that is the way AP ammunition works. The bullet strikes the plate, its energy is converted to heat so the bullet jacket and the surface of the plate melt, allowing the AP core to go through the molten plate. If the plate is thick enough that the heat is absorbed too fast, the AP core will not penetrate, but will stick in the plate when the molten part solidifies.

Jim

trapperjohn
February 21, 2005, 11:25 PM
temperature is not really going to be an issue as far as it affecting the target. The residance time in the barrell is very short (for a 300fps bullet about 0.0013 s) even though the gasses are 1500-2000f, that is not enough time to significantly raise the temperature of the bullet, some frictional heating will also occor, but the bullet being made of lead is dense and heave and not enough energy can be transfered to it to raise the average temperature. for a 200 yard shot the 3000fps bullet will be in flight for roughly 0.2 seconds. During that time the heating that did occur in the barrel is being conducted to the center of the bullet. It does take time for the heat to travel from the surface of the bullet to the center of the bullet. The sides of the bullet may be cooled by the convection of the flying projectile. there is the possiblitly of the tip heating up if the bullet is fast enough, at 3000fps the air temperature that the bullet tip sees is going to be roughly 800F. This is the stagnation temperature of air at 300fps. Again this flight tiem is quite short. not enough time to really heat the bullet. once the bullet strikes flesh it is rapidly cooled as it contacts a liquid media that is able to efficiently convect heat away from the bullet.

Malamute
February 21, 2005, 11:29 PM
Armor piercing shaped charges (RPG) penetrate by melting a hole with the shaped charge, but I don't think that regular small arms rounds do. I may be wrong, but armor piercing rounds go through more than steel, and they don't likely melt through concrete or other materials. The cores are very hard, and resist deformation upon impact. I believe the jacket and lead part strip away as they deform upon impact, they are simply a vehicle to deliver the core through the barrel and to the target.

I've also picket up freshly fired bullets, they are HOT when fresh.

I recall hearing people say that the sensation they felt when shot was "DANG that BURNS!!!"

bamawrx
February 21, 2005, 11:44 PM
Remember Myth Busters Ice Bullet? The ice didn't meld during firing, but it lacked the mass needed to do any real damage. I'd guess based on what I saw there that the bullet doesn't have time for good heat exchange under most circumstances. Although, the full auto/silencer info was interesting. Sounds like a liquid core projectile would have some interesting characteristics.

Dave R
February 21, 2005, 11:55 PM
Another factor to consider is--how hot does the brass get? The brass is subject to the same burnings (maybe more, since it stays put while the bullet is moving.) OTOH, the brass does't pick up heat from friction.

I don't understand all these stories about getting burned from brass. When I shoot my .308 or my .223 or my 7.5 Swiss, I catch the brass in the air when I eject it. That is usually within 1 sec of firing, and it doesn't have much time in the air to cool. The brass is warm, but not too hot to hold.

Pistol brass? I dunno. I've never been able to catch pistol brass in the air. Been hit by some, and it didn't feel hot. But maybe I wasn't is contact with it enough for thermal transfer.

So my point is, if the brass doesn't get all that hot, how does the bullet get very much hotter?

Selfdfenz
February 22, 2005, 12:19 AM
Dave,

"I don't understand all these stories about getting burned from brass. When I shoot my .308 or my .223 or my 7.5 Swiss, "I catch the brass in the air when I eject it. That is usually within 1 sec of firing, and it doesn't have much time in the air to cool. The brass is warm, but not too hot to hold."

This may have nothing to do with anything but I have noticed may times HP cases are not beyond being handled after firing....... but let a 22 case from one of the botton ejecting Browning 22 autos get caught between your shirt sleeve and skin and it will "fry" to your skin. Don't ask me how I discovered that, over and over again. :D

S-

VARifleman
February 22, 2005, 11:07 AM
I remember getting struck in the leg by a ricochet from my .22lr (it just bounced off my leg), that bullet was, I'd guess 150 degrees, but since lead doesn't hold heat energy very well, it didn't feel too hot, unlike 150 degree water.

dev_null
February 22, 2005, 01:04 PM
Is that a European bullet or an African bullet?
Laden or unladen?
Is it carrying a coconut?


- 0 -

fletcher
February 22, 2005, 01:07 PM
Remember Myth Busters Ice Bullet? The ice didn't meld during firing, but it lacked the mass needed to do any real damage.

IIRC, the ice bullet never left the barrel intact - it kept shattering before leaving. As soon as it hit the rifling, it probably shattered - ice is not flexible enough to take the indentions rifling would put on a real bullet. The mass of an ice bullet would have the mass to do damage, IF it could stay intact, but it couldn't.

41mag
February 22, 2005, 01:25 PM
DaveR?I have had burns from both 40S&W & 22lr fired from pistols.

A .40 was caught between my glasses my head.The .22 landed on top of my T-shirt collar.

Had a burn scar for months.

Glock19Fan
February 22, 2005, 01:56 PM
I, too, have been burned by cases.

My most memorable was when I was bench shooting my .22LR Marlin 60. The shooting range has individual stalls, with the walls being about 4 feet apart. One of the ejected cases bounced off the wall, and landed on my left arm, just below the inside of my elbow, and rested there for a second or two until I brushed it off. It burned into the skin. This was around a year ago and the scar is still visible.

Ive been hit by hot cases from my Glock 19 but non of them were as bad as the little .22LR.

I guess the outside of the case of the thin .22LR heats up a lot quicker than the thicker cases of the .308. I probably could catch a .22LR after being fired without being burned, but it would be tricky. :uhoh:

williamcrane
February 22, 2005, 03:11 PM
Depends on how long ago it was fired... :neener:

dwhitlat
February 13, 2007, 12:28 AM
Assuming a lead bullet:
c(p) about 129 J/(kg-K)
k(bullet) about 35.3 W/(m-K)
h(air) = 500 W/(m^2-K)

Temp(bullet) = T(air) + (Temp(initially) - T(air)) * e^(-h*Area*time/(bullet mass*c(p)))
or
T(f) = T(air) + [T(i) - T(air)] * e^(-h*A*t/(m*c(p)))

The air temperature (recompression shock region) is probably going to heat the bullet up significantly along with the air friction :fire: .

A spherical, lead bullet with a .003 meter radius, an initial temperature (temperature from the barrel) of 400K (127 Celsius), flying for about 10 seconds in air that is heated to about 700K (427 Celsius) will have a final temp of 572K (about 300 Celsius :eek: ).

But if you want to know how hot the bullet really is experimentation is the cheapest way to go.

-David

sam59
February 13, 2007, 12:56 AM
.
Jim is correct about bullets being hot after hitting steel. The heat softens the steel and allows the bullet to penetrate. I am not sure, but I think certain steel is hardened by high temperatures thus making it acceptable to shoot with rifles and not divot it since the steel can withstand the heat.

shooter503
February 13, 2007, 01:35 AM
Load a 40-50 grain varmint bullet over a strong powder load in a 223 and the bullet can vaporize. Done it many times. I don't know where the bullet goes but you can get a smoke trail where it was and nothing hits the target. We were using a Remington XP100 action.

boilingleadbath
February 13, 2007, 02:35 PM
I'm not sure the numbers given to us by that infra-red lab test will be terribly accurate; they probably took the measurment a few yards from the muzzle, at which distance the bullet would have been unevenly heated (hot jacket, cool core).

...and isn't the "exploding varmit bullet" simply the bullet coming appart under centrifugal forces?

CajunBass
February 13, 2007, 03:27 PM
Hot pistol brass will definately burn you. I've seen my wife about strip a couple of times at the range until she learned to button ALL the buttons on her blouse. :D

JesseL
February 13, 2007, 03:52 PM
Load a 40-50 grain varmint bullet over a strong powder load in a 223 and the bullet can vaporize. Done it many times. I don't know where the bullet goes but you can get a smoke trail where it was and nothing hits the target. We were using a Remington XP100 action.

That's usually the result of a weakly constructed bullet being spun too fast by the rifling. The bullet can't handle the centrifugal force and bursts shortly after leaving the barrel.

Cosmoline
February 13, 2007, 03:58 PM
Also, IIRC if it hits something metal at the end that process will generate heat as well.

Bazooka Joe71
February 13, 2007, 04:02 PM
What's the temperature of a fired bullet?

Why not just stick your finger in front of the muzzle and find out?:D


Tell us how it works out.

Fly320s
February 13, 2007, 04:21 PM
What's the temperature of a fired bullet?
42?

:D

Lbys
February 13, 2007, 04:23 PM
dwhitlat's analysis above is pretty good. I'm actually a bit jealous, since I used to know how to figure that kind of thing out. Alas, much of Heat & Mass Transfer has left me.

The link below is to a PDF of the IR imaging article that might have been referenced above. A couple differences from dwhitlat's calcs:


The bullet is a .30 cal boat-tail (assume FMJ)
The images are taken soon after the bullet leaves the muzzle


What's interesting is that the IR image has been processed to account for differences in emissivity, or (I think) how easily a given region radiates heat. Their analysis indicates frictional heating where the bullet contacts the rifling lands, and aerodynamic heating at the bullet tip (as well as reflection from the heat of the muzzle flash at the bullet's base).

So, what do we need to solve this problem conclusively? (I'm just guessing, but it's kind of neat to pretend I still remember this stuff):


Heat transfer coefficient of the air (fairly easy to get)
Heat transfer coefficient and thickness of the copper jacket (again, easy)
Heat transfer coefficient and thickness of lead core to center (easy)
Coefficient of friction between bullet and rifling (not so easy?)
Initial bullet temp (assume this from the IR analysis?)
Travel time (say on a 100 m range?)
Effects of aerodynamic heating (maybe where dwhitla's calcs come in?)


Figure all that, and you could probably get a good approximation of the temp (both surface and core) at the instant before impact.

I agree, though, that it would take less time, and be a lot more fun, just to shoot it and see.

Any other ideas?

http://www.indigosystems.com/PDF/articles/AdvImg3-04.pdf

gezzer
February 14, 2007, 08:40 PM
Hot enough to leave a mark. :what:

MT GUNNY
February 14, 2007, 11:37 PM
But i do know a 22 round is hot enough to singe dried wood (causing a little smoke) at 25 yards even
after walking the distance to the target after the shot.

bogie
February 14, 2007, 11:51 PM
The problem is that the bullets don't stay still long enough to insert the thermometer.

Freedomv
February 15, 2007, 06:11 AM
While in the Army we fired the m-16 at plastic-fibreglass silhouette targets and the holes left in the target were melted around the edge and had shrunk in size so as to appear about .17 cal not .223. These were at 600 yards.
Bullets had to be hot to do that.

$.02

Vern

DMK
February 15, 2007, 11:28 AM
I've never seen any burn marks on paper target. :confused:

Freedomv
February 15, 2007, 01:10 PM
DMK

I believe you will find that plastic will melt at a much lower temperature that target paper will burn.
Try warming a nail on the kitchen stove (not cherry red, just hot) and then placing it on a plastic milk jug and heating it again and placing it on a target paper.
I think you will find that the jug will melt before the paper will show signs of burning. Obviously if you heat the nail cherry red both the paper will burn/scorch and the plastic will melt.
Also you could try pushing a heated nail thru the jug and removing it rapidly taking note of how thw plastic deforms during the experiment.


Actually sounds like a project for the box of truth. Might be kind of fun. On a warm day that is, right now the temperature here is at zero degrees and that would not help the experiment.

Vern

Anna's Dad
February 15, 2007, 06:36 PM
What's the temperature of a fired bullet?

42?


That may be wasted on most of the readers, but I laughed out loud.

Anna's Dad
February 15, 2007, 06:41 PM
I've never seen any burn marks on paper target.

Myself, having little knowledge of the physics involved but a much greater knowledge of science fiction (in the particular instance, Ray Bradbury) will conclude that they are cooler than 451 degrees fahrenheit. :D

Ryder
February 15, 2007, 09:29 PM
I doubt they get as hot as that ejected case that landed in my shirt pocket the other day. Even if they were it couldn't cauterize a wound considering I fished it out with my bare fingers.

Fired bullets that fall onto ice do not melt into the surface enough to be evident. I've even picked them up off the top of packed snow. The same can not be said for ejected cases. Those will melt into a frozen surface enough to be evident.

Ever seen bubbling coming off a bullet after it was fired into water? I haven't. If it exceeded 212 F by very much it would cause boiling.

Barrelmaker
February 16, 2007, 01:43 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fly320s

Quote:
What's the temperature of a fired bullet?
42?
That may be wasted on most of the readers, but I laughed out loud.


Ok clue us in.

carebear
February 16, 2007, 01:51 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42_%28number%29

Scroll down to "meanings in pop culture"

Soybomb
February 16, 2007, 01:58 AM
and being brass which has quite a high thermal coefficient
Not to mention theres alot less thermal mass to change the temperature and would be able to take alot more heat before raising in temperature as quickly I would think.

pistolman1974
February 16, 2007, 02:24 AM
Hot as hell!....In Centigrade:neener:

Geronimo45
February 16, 2007, 02:37 AM
Lemme take a wild guess: Three hundred and twelve degrees fahrenheit, on average, for rifle and pistol bullets.

Lesser heat for lesser bullets + lesser velocities.

Magnums can get very warm, though.

I discovered all this while doing my nightly Ninjitsu meditations. Debunk at your own peril. *prepares to launch throwing stars*

Odd Job
February 16, 2007, 03:33 AM
I recommend "Gunshot Wounds" by Vincent J. M. Di Maio
Page 85 and 92

The bottom line is that bullets don't even get hot enough to be sterilized after firing. Bacteria placed on the bullet before firing can be cultured from the retrieved bullet. This has been known for a long time:

Von Beck, B. Cited by La Garde, L. A. Can a septic bullet infect a gunshot wound? N.Y. Med. J. 56: 458-464, 1892

Thoresby, F. P. and Darlow, H. M. The mechanisms of primary infection of bullet wounds Br. J. Surg. 54: 359-361, 1967

Stainless Chili
February 16, 2007, 03:44 AM
I'm surprised no one answered the easiest of your questions :)

The melting point of lead ... (327.46C, 621.43F)

I always thought it was 550, but that might have been 50/50 lead/tin solder.

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