CZ-52 ,the gun,ammo and availability


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standingbear
March 12, 2005, 01:41 PM
CZ-52s are starting to get an itch going since I bought my makerov, Ive never shot one but am curious about them.How well are they made,how much do they cost,how much is the ammo and is it available. lastly with regards to the ballistics, how does it compare to say a 9mm?


I just may look for one of these and Ive got 1 too many skss.

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Candiru
March 12, 2005, 02:47 PM
Just looking around and reading up, it appears that the CZ-52's reasonable price range is between $90 and $120. The two places that seem to have the best online prices appear to be AIM Surplus (http://aimsurplus.com) and SOG (http://southernohiogun.com). There are two versions: the original, which has a gray Parkerized finish, and the factory reconditioned gun, which is blued. The factory-reconditioned version has "VOZ XX" marked on the frame above the trigger, where XX is the last two digits of the year it was reconditioned. Also look at the sight rib--after being reconditioned, the pistol was checked for accuracy and the sight rib marked with from one to four (most to least accurate, respectively) notches. The forum posts I've read actually seem to indicate that the "very good" quality guns (almost always the Parkerized versions) seem to perform more reliably than the factory reconditioned ("excellent" quality) ones. That's anecdotal, though.

Safety-wise, the big issue is that the decocker can sometimes act like a trigger, due to wearing of the parts. This can be tested by placing a dowel or pencil in the (unloaded) barrel, decocking, and watching for movement of the dowel or pencil. Additionally, the firing pin is brittle and can easily break, so use a snap cap to practice. Replacement firing pins (in fact, replacement just-about-anything) can be had at makarov.com (http://makarov.com).

Behaviorally, the CZ-52 is an SAO pistol with a very heavy trigger (although you can get springs to fix that) and a very heavy hammer (ditto on the springs). It uses a locking cam mechanism, similar to the MG-42. Its mainspring is very heavy, so it takes muscle, caution, and a screwdriver to disassemble it. From what I've read, it appears that the heavy mechanism likes fairly hot ammo to work reliably--but beware of surprlus 7.62x25--some of it is designed for SMGs and is loaded too hot for the CZ-52.

The 7.62x25 round is usually reaches 1300-1600 fps and has great penetration, which makes it great for armored targets but of dubious self-defense value. I've read that the CZ-52 is a fun gun to fire, whose loud report and long muzzle flash attract attention.

All of the above is information I've gathered through research, so I can't personally vouch for any of it. In fact, I clicked on this forum to post a question about the CZ-52: I want to know about its safety. I'd like to buy one as a car gun and for fun range shooting, but I'm wary of pistols that have spent the last 50 years being handled by eastern-european conscripts. A fun range gun quits being fun real fast when it KBs and takes off a couple fingers!

So, if standingbear has no objections, I'd like to add my question to his thread: How safe/reliable are CZ-52s, given modern retail ammuntion (e.g. S&B)? Also, can anyone vouch for the performance of the "excellent" condition vs. the "very good" condition guns?

skynyrd1911
March 12, 2005, 03:11 PM
My first non .22 semi-auto was a CZ 52. Cheap and reliable. I can't really recall any FTF or FTE.....Kinda wish I had it back, but I got the .45 disease. It will shake the ground you're standing on. In fact, one of my brothers and I were standing above this creek shooting down at some cans and old plates once and you could see the ground, tree roots and everything around the bank shake when that pistol was fired. My brother wouldn't touch it. It gave me a rush! I just wished I could find ammo for it at my local gunstores. Military surplus is all I could find. Had to search for those rounds. Occasionally, I could find some of recent manufacture. Sellier & Bellot (hope I spelled that right). The fellow from whom I purchased it told me it was comparable to a .357 magnum. He jokingly told me it would blow the wheels off my truck. He wasn't far off.... :D

standingbear
March 12, 2005, 04:12 PM
no problemo candiru. For the most part, I want something with more boom than my makerov yet as well made and as reliable. I cant afford much and the cz seems to have it but the question comes up..is it safe and how often do they break...Ie. firing pins and other key parts.

benewton
March 12, 2005, 06:42 PM
Not exactly the most precision weapon ever made, my pair have tooling marks in all unimportant places.

Too, there is the firing pin problem, and the decocker shouldn't be used, so far as I'm concerned.

The weapon fits my hand, is more narrow than my .40 USPc, and about the same height, though, of course, longer in the barrel. In hand, seems to run about the same weight, too.

The issue sights suck.

The 7.62x25 appears, from most sources, to be good on soft armor, but not on stopping power. But the sources don't really consider reloads, speciality bullets, and so forth.

As for me, I'm a convert to the weapon.

I've no problem with a 1911 type SA, but I do not like the loading sequence for "cocked and locked": you always end up with the safety off, a live round in the chamber, and weapon handling going on. Always seemed to me to be a prescription for an "accident" to happen, so the ability to load the CZ with the safety ON seems important to me.

The decock I ignore, 'cause what's the point of the function in an SA?

I also like the round.

Anti armor capability can't hurt, and I'm reasonable sure I can come up with a bound shot round to cover the unarmored situation. And, look at the energy figures! This'll be a fun one to play with. After all is said and done, for one bullet, you can get penetration through armor, or expansion and stopping power, but not both. Again, look at the numbers.


S&B has factory ammo all over the web, so ammo isn't a problem.
To be sure, I don't think much of it, for no reason I can explain, and'll start my harder reloads with Starline brass, although I'll use up the S&B for "practice" ammo, if there is such at 1.6K FPS.

Buy one ASAP!
They're fun, and cheap right now, but, with any history at all, you have to understand that they soon won't be.

As for the firing portion, I normally fire in my back yard, with (old) headphones, and didn't notice anything in particular while shooting the weapons. Although I've only a couple of hundred rounds through the pair, I don't expect I'll have to deal with anything unusual in that venue.

I may bring one south to MD, where I'm currently on assignment, and that'd mean a public range, in a populated area, which'd be, as they say, a new experience,.

I bought both pistols from AIM, and I'd say buy the cheaper, since that is by far the weapon in the best shape of the pair I own.

True, the finish of the more expensive is black, rather than gray, but both are, in essence, pristene, and the older gray lacks the rear sight "ding" of the black refinish.


To make it quick:

Like the round for now, I'll see what can be done with it.

Like the weapon's feel, but hate the heel mag release.

I also think that an ejection port opening is in order.

Replacing the firing pin, via the Makarov site, brings the trigger weight within reason


Do it, it's fun, and it's not far from being outlawed as anti armor.

standingbear
March 12, 2005, 07:19 PM
thanks, I was curious about stopping power. I dont have alot of money and still have my makerov but wanted something bigger but not too much power..for around the house. I have a 44 mag but its just a tad too much :D

JohnKSa
March 12, 2005, 08:41 PM
Also look at the sight rib--after being reconditioned, the pistol was checked for accuracy and the sight rib marked with from one to four (most to least accurate, respectively) notches.Actually the purpose of these marks has never been established although I've heard many people state the "accuracy marks" theory as fact. The best theory is that they are marks left from hardness testing.

Candiru
March 12, 2005, 09:04 PM
Actually the purpose of these marks has never been established although I've heard many people state the "accuracy marks" theory as fact. The best theory is that they are marks left from hardness testing.
I stand corrected! This was from a Guns & Ammo article, so I guess you just can't believe everything you read.

mr.trooper
March 12, 2005, 09:29 PM
The CZ-52 can be had for under $100, as mentined above

Also, i dont remember who said that the CZ is a .22? its not; its a 30 caliber.

As for as ENERGY, the 7.62x25 has energy levels at the muzzle comperable to the 45 ACP.

As mentioned, FMJ ammo in this caiber is not all that great for defence, unless your engaging a target with body armor. Seller & Bellot sells 85 grain FMJ ammo for 20 cents per round, and is avalible in large quantities from places like Cabelas.

As for as reloads, specialty bullets avalible for the 7.62x25 are:

Hornady:
* 85 grain XTP hollow point

Speer:
* 100 grain jacketed hollowpoint lead tip

Lapua:
* 85 & 93 grain lead wad-cutter

Sierra:
* 71 grain FMJ
* 90 grain jacketed hollow Cavity

These companys make other weights and types of bullets in the .312 diameter, but they are to heavy to be of any real use, and probably to long to cycle reliably.

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