Buckmark dry-fire question...


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OtG
March 12, 2005, 04:53 PM
Is it a bad idea to remove the firing pin assembly, then dry-fire the gun?

I know dry-firing a .22 is bad, because the firing pin whacks the breech.
Here, I've removed the firing pin (and recoil spring and guide rod), which leaves the hammer smacking into the slide. The doesn't seem like a big deal, since that's basically what happens anyway.
The biggest difference is that I need to push the slide closed after I cock it.

This seems like a good way to dry-fire, since the firing pin is not involved, it can't fire ammo (I have the firing pin assembly sitting on my desk) and I don't need to putz about with all manner of snap caps.

Am I missing something?

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MrTuffPaws
March 14, 2005, 12:17 AM
I guess that would work, but why don't you just go and get some 22lr dummy rounds. They work great. I got mine from Brownells.

Magnuumpwr
March 15, 2005, 12:06 AM
:confused: OtG, I have one question for you. Why are you wanting to dry fire your 22 pistol?

dfariswheel
March 15, 2005, 12:20 AM
What you're missing is the fact that like almost all post-WWII .22 firearms the Browning Buckmark can be safely dry fired as is.

Virtually all post-war .22 firearms have a positive stop firing pin as part of the design.
The firing pin CAN'T hit the rear of the barrel like older pre-war guns often would.

There's no need to remove the firing pin to practice.

hksw
March 15, 2005, 03:59 PM
I have a new entirely complete (assembled) Browning Buckmark slide assembly. (I had purchased it directly from Browning with the intent on replacing the older slide assembly of my Buckmark Silhouette Unlimited. I like the wing extensions on rear portion of the current Buckmark slides for added gripping area/angle when pulling the slide back.) Although the firing pin retaining pin does prevent the firing pin from traveling excessively forward, the firing pin, at least in my example, does go very slightly past the front face of the slide. This would mean that the firing pin would impact the face of the rear of the barrel, at least until it is worn down. Although this is probably due to manufacturing variances, the fact remains that the pin will hit the edge of the chamber. having briefly dry fired my first Buckmark when I first got it, I did notice some wear were the firing pin did hit the barrel and have since used a spent case or plastic snap cap for that design.

The firing pin retainer/stop on the Ruger products I know for sure will prevent the pin from hitting the barrel, I dry fire my MkIIs (and 10/22s) all of the time.

Some .22s currently made do actually allow the pin to hit the barrel but are designed to not damage the chamber edge. The strikers of the Marlin bolt guns I have, 15YN and 25N, both hit the barrel face. However, the striking surface of the striker is stepped. The portion of the striker that would hit the rim of the cartridge is very slightly stepped back from the outer/top portion of the front of the striker. The result is the striker hits the barrel away from the edge of the chamber prevent any damage in that area.

Magnuumpwr
March 15, 2005, 04:15 PM
Well, it seems like I am not in the norm. When I want to practice with my buckmark pistol, I simply put a mag in it and step onto the porch and let it rip. Guess that is the difference between living in the city and living in the woods. :neener: Didn't mean to sound rude earlier if that is what I came off like sounding! :)

c_yeager
March 16, 2005, 02:35 AM
Virtually all post-war .22 firearms have a positive stop firing pin as part of the design. The firing pin CAN'T hit the rear of the barrel like older pre-war guns often would.


Perhaps but there is a nice big divot in the chamber wall of my Buckmark that tells me that maybe this isnt something that you should trust to work if you value your gun.

MrTuffPaws
March 16, 2005, 01:07 PM
The firing pin on my buckmark does hit the barrel. DON'T DRY FIRE A BUCKMARK Get some snap caps or dummy rounds.

dfariswheel
March 16, 2005, 02:48 PM
What changed?????

I had an early model Buckmark that I dry fired thousands of times with not a mark on the barrel.

Ala Dan
March 16, 2005, 05:11 PM
I just checked my new Buckmark Classic Plus, and YES it does show a slight peen mark on the rear of the barrel.

OtG
March 16, 2005, 08:02 PM
I put some marker on the chamber wall, and after dry-firing it a few times, it did show some wear.

And unfortunately, I live in town and shooting a few mags off the back porch probably wouldn't wine me too many friends. :(

hksw
March 16, 2005, 08:25 PM
Didn't mean to sound rude earlier if that is what I came off like sounding!

Don't sweat it. It doesn't say the Buckmarks should be dry fired or not for disassembly/storage in Browning's manual so the owners don't know.

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