"Gernade" and other terminology pet peeves


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mfree
March 17, 2005, 09:50 AM
I'm not really stirring the pot so much as trying to standardize our etymology :) Ok, so I'm stirring the pot.

Anyhow, at least 5 times in the last 2 days I've seen people spell grenade as "gernade". That ranks right up there on the skin-crawling chart as nukular and clip vs. magazine.

Any terminology gaffes I'm missing here?

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Indy7373
March 17, 2005, 10:00 AM
Would calling my firearms "boomsticks" fit into that category?!? :D Hey thats what Ash called them in the Evil Dead movies. :D

mfree
March 17, 2005, 10:04 AM
Nonono, that's fine, I'm talking about things like "barettas" and sometimes beyond the gun world, stuff like the "chevy camero"....

Control Group
March 17, 2005, 10:14 AM
Oh, my.

If we're going beyond the gun world, butt naked instead of buck naked. Beckon call instead of beck and call. Third wheel instead of fifth wheel. Intensive purposes instead of intents and purposes. Supposively instead of supposedly. Case and point instead of case in point. Using i.e. instead of e.g. and vice versa.

The only one I can think of within the gun world is the widespread misuse of the term "bullet" to mean any part or all of a round...although I'm pretty sure I haven't seen anyone on THR do that.

tuna
March 17, 2005, 10:23 AM
My two "favorites" have already been taken - clip and bullet

Other peeves I have are: "Assault Rifle", "Machine Gun", "Sniper Rifle"
I don't mind the above when used properly, but they never are in the media.

Bear Gulch
March 17, 2005, 10:29 AM
Clip still is the all time winner.

With the possible exception of battle rifle used without a historical context. The brown Bess musket was a battle rifle, it is not what folks mean anymore.

Nathanael_Greene
March 17, 2005, 10:32 AM
For me, it's the many misspellings of "varmint"--varmet, varmit, varmat, varmant, etc. etc. Not the end of the word, I know, but it's a peeve.

When I read the gun auction websites, it amazes me how many people misspell the name of the firearm they're selling--fer cryin' out loud, it's written right on the thing! Instead, you get Ithica, Remmington, Tauras, Smith & Wessin, and so on.

Aside from the gun world, I love it when people say "he's made a 360-degree turnaround"--I wonder if they're aware what they're actually saying.

Indy7373
March 17, 2005, 10:42 AM
Now, there might be some confusion between Naked and nekkid. Naked is simply being without clothes on. Nekkid is being without clothes and up to no good. Be sure to make this distinction. :what: :D

mete
March 17, 2005, 10:56 AM
For those involved with electronics you can make" germanium "transistors and if you are a green thumb type you can make "geranium" transistors !

WT
March 17, 2005, 11:05 AM
I got me a set of them karate 'numb chucks.'

Shovelhead
March 17, 2005, 11:08 AM
To - Two - Too

There - They're - Their

The Rabbi
March 17, 2005, 11:12 AM
Irregardless. Big pet peeve.
"Healthy" to describe food.

jsalcedo
March 17, 2005, 11:38 AM
Loose (not tight)

Lose (to misplace or not win)

Looser (not as tight as another)

Loser (a habitual non-winner)

DSRUPTV
March 17, 2005, 12:01 PM
I get sick of hearing all of the slang for guns and shooting.

Heat = gun
Gat = gun
Packin' = carrying a weapon
"Hot" someone = to shoot someone
Clip = magazine
Bust a cap = fire a round

If everyone used proper and professional sounding words to refer to firearms, I think the image would be better. Thankfully this forum is filled with people that use words like firearm, weapon, and magazine.

The Rabbi
March 17, 2005, 12:09 PM
I've often wondered where the term "roscoe" for gun came from. Anyone have an idea?

MaterDei
March 17, 2005, 12:17 PM
Hand Cannon
irregardless

and the one I see a lot...

alot

Peet
March 17, 2005, 12:18 PM
THANK YOU Shovelhead! I see that confusion on EVERY board I look at (not just gun boards).

Hows about: joo-luh-ry (jewelry)
reel-uh-toor (realtor)
ATM machine (GRRRrrrrrr)
PIN number (GRRRrrrrrr again)

White Horseradish
March 17, 2005, 12:19 PM
"Healthy" to describe food.Well, if the food is venison, I would really like it to be healthy... :)

Should of instead of should've. Bayonette for bayonet. That one is actuallly quite funny, since a bayonette would be a female bayonet. I keep having visions of elegant mother of pearl inlaid ones...

What really drives me up the wall, though, is when people misspell in auctions and ads. There used to be a guy on eBay that kept pushing "ritaul" daggers. Baretta was a detective on TV, Beretta is the gun manufacturer.

Assult -> Assault
Kalishnikov -> Kalashnikov
Tokerav ->Tokarev



There are more...

Dannyboy
March 17, 2005, 01:00 PM
An old sig of mine said it for me.

The word is have. Could HAVE. Would HAVE. Should HAVE. Not could OF. Should OF. Would OF.

That drives me up a wall.

pax
March 17, 2005, 01:04 PM
Alright, alright allready!

I do'nt "know" why we have too be so pickey about stuf like that.

So what if someone calls a magazein a clip. They know what they mean. If someone who used the wrong word could of figured out the right one by themself, they would of.

pax

English? Pfffffttt, what do I need to learn that for? I'm not going to England! -- Homer Simpson

dmallind
March 17, 2005, 01:06 PM
My own personal peeve is the death of the adverb.

When even professional communicators and writers describe people as "running quick" it's time to just heave the style manual into the garbage real quick. :rolleyes:

MaterDei
March 17, 2005, 01:06 PM
Dannyboy, you couldn't of said it better!

The Rabbi
March 17, 2005, 01:07 PM
Well, if the food is venison, I would really like it to be healthy...

Impossible. The deer might have been healthy. The venison, though, is dead.

KAR120C
March 17, 2005, 01:10 PM
for guns I have to say CMP customers using the term "racker" instead of "rack grade" rubs me the wrong way for some reason.

Your, instead of you're (the Clinton White House made that mistake once in an invitation)

Jive, when they mean jibe. This one is really bad because jive (BS) means almost the opposite of jibe (to be in agreement). I hear it constantly.

"Beg the question" - NOTE this does not mean "raises the question", or "makes one want to ask the question...". Rather it is a logical fallacy in which you assume to be true that which you are trying to prove. In other words it means making a circular argument. This gets used correctly about 0.001% of the time.

White Horseradish
March 17, 2005, 01:17 PM
Here's another couple. Accept and except, affect and effect. Also a common thing in auctions, as in "I except checks".

sm
March 17, 2005, 01:24 PM
I tend to put more stock into the message than to get caught up in some details. Granted there is something to expressing one's ideas in a correct manner.

I admit, I am not as educated as some. I was 'publik skooled" in the South afterall. Then again I do type as I speak on purpose, I don't know other than to give some personality to my postings - it does cover 'some' mistakes ( I hope).

I am guilty of poking fun at myself , many of us do this for a mental break. I am taking Micro Apps II and a classmate emailed about some questions on "Wurd" , Axcel, and Excess* :D

* pax should really appreciate this one ;)

I don't know - after spending time with a kid who called the trigger a "tigger" , I kind of like calling it a "tigger". Important thing was she has the 4 rules in concept and practice, I am not going to worry about details and such at this stage.

She helps me pull the "tigger" , when done I am supposed to fill the "thingy" with more bullets. Made sense to me. :)

Sunray
March 17, 2005, 01:28 PM
"...The brown Bess musket was a battle rifle..." No it wasn't. It wasn't a rifle. It was a smooth bore. snicker.
Poor spelling in general makes me crazy. Especially when I see words like 'colour' spelt 'color'. It is the Queen's English after all. snicker.

Sergeant Sabre
March 17, 2005, 01:33 PM
"have an idear"

"I have an ideal"

"What are you drawl-ng a picture of?"

"I have to warsh my clothes"

"I could care less" <--- So you must care some then, right? Because if you couldn't care less that means you don't care at all, which is what I think you were trying to say.

Andrew Rothman
March 17, 2005, 01:41 PM
"Assualt" weapons.

Argh!!!!

firesafety3
March 17, 2005, 01:43 PM
Recticle instead of reticle. Sending a pitcher, instead of a picture.

Using a nakin, in place of a napkin. To reiterate is to say again, not reinerate.

Thanks for the post, I thought I was the only one that was bugged by these things. I feel much better...I weally, weally do!

MikeIsaj
March 17, 2005, 01:47 PM
Preventative maintenance! Is that what you do to preventate a failure? Do we also do correctative maintenance. It is preventive not preventative. I know, it's in the dictionary. That's another pet peeve. Things are in the dictionary because they are used, not because they are correct.

While we're at it can someone describe the difference between an automatic pistol and a semi-automatic pistol?

The Rabbi
March 17, 2005, 01:48 PM
Poor spelling in general makes me crazy. Especially when I see words like 'colour' spelt 'color'. It is the Queen's English after all. snicker.

Color
Odor
Parlor
Jail
Curb
Glamor
Flavor

We have the nukes, we make the rules. Get over it.

280PLUS
March 17, 2005, 01:53 PM
Can I axe you a question about your sangwich?

:banghead:

TarpleyG
March 17, 2005, 02:17 PM
Is it alright or all right? I have seen it both ways in print.

Greg

dasmi
March 17, 2005, 02:20 PM
Your and You're. I can't stand it when people mix these two up.

pax
March 17, 2005, 02:23 PM
TarpleyG ~

It is all right.

Alright is incorrect. (Although grammar rules do change over time, and I'm expecting that one to slip through the back door any year now.)

pax

tuna
March 17, 2005, 02:25 PM
Back to gun topics: here's one I'm surprised everyone missed: "GUN CONTROL" - doesn't that really mean hitting your target?

del4
March 17, 2005, 02:27 PM
I hate it when people say "schnyper" instead of "sniper". :rolleyes:

mfree
March 17, 2005, 02:31 PM
Well, I intended this all to be about the written word, but it's all good :)

Peet, sounds like you'd appreciate "NIC card"....

The Rabbi
March 17, 2005, 02:37 PM
Can I axe you a question about your sangwich?

That's pronounced "sammich" thank you. :neener:

Larry Ashcraft
March 17, 2005, 02:55 PM
Shottie or Shotty for shotgun. I hate that one.

jlwatts3
March 17, 2005, 03:04 PM
Control group, or anyone else for that matter, what is the difference between i.e. and e.g.?
One of those things I've always wondered and never asked.

KAR120C
March 17, 2005, 03:15 PM
i.e. and e.g. are both abreviations for Latin phrases, I believe Id est, and exampla gratia (sp). But you don't need to know that to use them.

i.e. just means "that is"

e.g. means "for example"

firesafety3
March 17, 2005, 03:16 PM
e.g. -Latin: exempla gratia meaning "for example"
i.e. - Latin: id est meaning "that is"


Often used incorrectly. Really bothers me when people speak and say "i.e.", particularly when it incorrectly used.

Old Fud
March 17, 2005, 03:16 PM
to, two and too
Their, There and they're
Your and you're

Those three are like biting on foil to me.

i.e. means "in other words"
e.g. means "for example"

Unfortunately for the survival of life as we know it on this earth, "Alright" has become an acceptable alternate spelling for "all Right". It started shortly after a Beetle wrote the song "It's Alright with me". Having done so, 100 million teenagers agreed that's the way it has to be, both Thorndike and Webster bent like reeds, and in less than 6 months New York Times was using it regularly. Bah, humbug!

Fud

joebogey
March 17, 2005, 03:16 PM
One of my biggest pet peeves, (is, are, would be) folks who have so much time on, (their, they're, there) hands, that they have nothing better to do than complain about someone (else's, elses') spelling.

If (you're, your, yore) smart enough to know how to use all of those words, you should be able to read the posts no matter how the person spells it.
Deal with it. We aren't all English (magors, majors).

RocketMan
March 17, 2005, 03:16 PM
Irregardless, noone should of cared about any of this. :neener:

SAWBONES
March 17, 2005, 03:19 PM
OK, I'll jump into this one!
Actually, "alot" and "alright' have supposedly become acceptable alternative or irregular usages.

While the abbreviation "i.e." is correct for id est, the abbreviation e.g. is not correct for ergo, contrary to what another poster above wrote; it should be eg.

Spelling, syntax and other language usage errors are so common today as to encourage one to simply overlook them, at least in trivial discourse on the Internet.

A particularly common mystery for many is the application and positioning of that dreaded punctuation mark, the apostrophe. Even supposedly-educated folks are found misusing it.

firesafety3
March 17, 2005, 03:20 PM
Speaking of acronyms, what's the deal with kids talking like they're (used it correctly) sending e-mails????

AISI, FWIW, ITIK...I don't know what the hell they're saying! After all the years of the old folks saying it seemed like the kids spoke another language, I guess it's true!

Sawdust
March 17, 2005, 03:58 PM
Advice and advise - they are two different words.

And a phrase:

It is "I couldn't care less"

not "I could care less"

After all, if you *could* care less, then that means that you *do* care to some degree...intellego?

Freedspeak
March 17, 2005, 04:12 PM
Dribble, should be drivel. :)

S Roper
March 17, 2005, 04:12 PM
How about when people use ".gov" when they don't mean the domain?

S Roper
March 17, 2005, 04:14 PM
Another is "mute" instead of "moot."

Sean Cloherty
March 17, 2005, 04:21 PM
Latest phrases which get under my skin include:

"As of yet . . . "

"Expresso"

"and as well"

"spendy"

Oh yeah, and what is with putting quotes around damn near any word in the sentence for no known reasons??!?!? :barf:

pax
March 17, 2005, 04:32 PM
Hmmmm, looks to me as if this thread is getting too far away from being gun related, as required by our mission statement.

Two possibilities:

1) post here, and stick with gun related gripes only (or at least drop in a firearms term, somewhere)

or

2) start a similar thread at APS (http://www.armedpolitesociety.com/forum/), Oleg's off-topic playground.

Thanks,

pax

Gordon Fink
March 17, 2005, 05:10 PM
So what if someone calls a magazein [sic] a clip[?]

Because I need a clip to load a magazine. :D

~G. Fink

CodeBlue
March 17, 2005, 05:32 PM
Here is one that drives me up the wall.

People who say "nucular" instead of "nuclear."

George Bush is the president of the United States. You would think that he would know how to say the word.

kudu
March 17, 2005, 06:25 PM
This is what annoys me.

About every other post in the shotguns section people will spell guage for 12 guage instead of the proper way, GAUGE.

GEM
March 17, 2005, 06:29 PM
What kinds of guns are used in Isreal? See gun content!

mons meg
March 17, 2005, 06:51 PM
Ensure the chamber is unloaded before handing your firearm off for inspection.

Insure anybody who does not ensure their firearm is unloaded before handing it off...

WvaBill
March 17, 2005, 08:31 PM
Trombone guns
Automatic AR-15
Bulletproof motors-They're neither
"Flash suppressors to hide the shooter's location"
.50 Cal sniper rifle designed for the military

Stevie-Ray
March 17, 2005, 09:44 PM
People who say "nucular" instead of "nuclear." My old boss said it that way and he had master's degrees in both chemistry and biology. :uhoh: I would've slapped him, but he probably still wouldn't have gotten it right.

Irregardless pisses me off too. I always ask them to look it up. It appears only in the American Heritage Dictionary,(go figure) and it's definition is.............regardless. Duh.

The Rabbi
March 17, 2005, 10:02 PM
I always thought "nucular" was kind of charming. Sort of like "Calvalry" for both cavalry and Calvary.

MarkDido
March 17, 2005, 10:19 PM
I was listening to the news the other day. The anchor was describing a shooting somewhere in which 3 people were injured. He stated that "3 people were caught in the crossfire"

Can't have a "crossfire" with only one shooter :rolleyes:

JohnKSa
March 17, 2005, 10:50 PM
Aperature sight instead of aperture sight.

Open sights used when one really means iron sights. (Aperture/peep/ghost ring sights are iron sights but are not open sights.)

Site instead of sight and vice versa. A site is a place or location. A sight is something you see or use to aim.

Hangun instead of handgun.

Guage instead of gauge.

Berretta, Baretta, or Berreta instead of Beretta

Breach instead of breech and vice versa. A breach is an opening or break or the action of making a break or opening; "to breach". A breech is the back end of the barrel where a cartridge is inserted in a non-muzzleloading firearm.

Break instead of brake and vice versa. Brakes slow things down. Guns have muzzle brakes--they are called that because they slow the recoil impulse. Breaks are what you get from the cops instead of what you deserve. ;)

This isn't a pet peeve, but it is nitpicky.

Use of gauge when bore is correct. For example, you can not have a 12 gauge rifled barrel. By definition, if the barrel is rifled, the designation is 12 bore. Bore and gauge are identical measurements (the number of pure lead balls of muzzle diameter required to make up a pound) but 'gauge' is ONLY applied to smoothbore guns while 'bore' is ONLY applied to guns with rifled barrels.

Kevlarman
March 17, 2005, 11:09 PM
Me fail English? That's unpossible! :neener:

I've seen breach for breech
Or muzzle break instead of muzzle brake

Silencer vs. suppressor?

I agree, if you're smart enough to use the proper words correctly, then you should be able to decipher what the other person is trying to say. That said though, it doesn't make a good impression on people if you can't differentiate between to, two, and too, or your and you're.

"Your stupid!"
hahaha
:D

Justin
March 18, 2005, 12:15 AM
http://angryflower.com/bobsqu.gif

RyanM
March 18, 2005, 01:06 AM
Just for comparison, Shakespeare had rotten grammar sometimes, too. The biggest gaff in the most famous line I can think of is:

"Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, Romeo?"

Wherefore means "for what reason?" just as therefore means "for that reason." So "wherefore art thou, Romeo" means "why are you, Romeo," not "where are you, Romeo." Whatta dumb way of adding on a syllable to a line that couldn't possibly hope to be iambic pentameter in the first place (unless "Romeo" is actually pronounced "Rome-oe" or "Rome-yo" :scrutiny: ).

Similarly, half-butted attempts at "ye olde english" really annoy me. They never used "ye" for "the!" It was an old runic letter, used for a vocalized "th" sound! It distinguishes between the sounds in "thorn" and "faðer" (father)! And some total moron printing press operator decided that "ð" looks more like a y than a d! When "dh" was the only intelligent choice to replace it with! Arrrrgh!

And to keep it gun-related, "clip" instead of "magazine" doesn't bother me at all. Definitely not as much as spelling and grammar errors.

edit: And html/UBB code errors are just dumb.

Tory
March 18, 2005, 08:36 AM
the masses who cannot distinguish "then" from "than."

It appears the difference between the temporal and comparative is too subtle.

Similarly, how often do you hear someone declare that they're "waiting ON" something? Hint: Unless you are a servant or it's under your feet, you're NOT "waiting on" it; you are waiting FOR it. Grasp the distinction.

Then again, if they can't discern the difference between loser and looser; they're, their and there; or even bullet and cartridge, what can we expect? :uhoh:

outofbattery
March 18, 2005, 08:55 AM
The mussel break on his'uns AK done broke .

Talon
March 18, 2005, 09:04 AM
I've often wondered where the term "roscoe" for gun came from. Anyone have an idea?

Dukes of Hazzard? :)

gvass
March 18, 2005, 09:29 AM
Wlather - Walter - Valter:-))
("you know, the jamesbond-pistol")

The Rabbi
March 18, 2005, 09:42 AM
Wlather - Walter - Valter:-))

The gun is made by Walther, which in English is pronounced Wall-ther. In German it is Valter.
This brings up another one: H en K. Why is it no one in America can say Heckler Koch (with the ch being pronounced like Scottish loch)?

They never used "ye" for "the!" It was an old runic letter, used for a vocalized "th" sound! It distinguishes between the sounds in "thorn" and "faðer" (father)! And some total moron printing press operator decided that "ð" looks more like a y than a d! When "dh" was the only intelligent choice to replace it with! Arrrrgh!

From the Wikipedia:

It was used in writing Middle English before the invention of the printing press: William Caxton, the first printer in England, brought with him type made in Continental Europe, which lacked thorn, yogh, and eth. He substituted "y" in place of thorn, and in fact "y" is still often substituted for it on gravestones and quaint store signs: "ye olde candies shoppe" should be read as "THe olde…", although it is jocularly or mistakenly pronounced "yee". This was not an arbitrary choice of Caxton's; in some manuscripts of the earlier 1400s (e.g. The Boke of Margery Kempe) the letters "y" and thorn were identical.

spartacus2002
March 18, 2005, 12:13 PM
anything for sale that is described using the adjective "tactical"

jsalcedo
March 18, 2005, 12:25 PM
Gun auctions that advertise "Colt For Sell" or "Saleing a kimber" really drive me nuts. I see these blatant mistakes so often that I go to Webster.com to double check myself.

perry1963
March 18, 2005, 01:02 PM
How about grips instead of stocks for the things we put on the butt of our handguns, grip is a verb, an action, "he grips his wifes hand as he says his wedding vows", stocks are a noun, person, place or "thing".

AG
March 18, 2005, 02:04 PM
This word drives me nuts ...

Impactful

I hear it on the evening news from time to time and have to turn the channel

Not sure if it is gaining acceptance or not .... but it irritates me....

Sergeant Sabre
March 18, 2005, 02:46 PM
Even though "pistol" means any handgun, as the first flintlock handguns were called "pistols", I hate when this term is applied to revolvers.

Along the same lines, I also hate the term "gun". A 1911 isn't a gun. Neiter is a Remington 700 or an M-16. Those are pistols and rifles. A gun is a crew-served weapon. Like a M240G or a M155 howitzer. I know that in normal-person-speak "gun" is appropriate. It was just drummed in to my head so much in the Marines that it really irritates me now, though.
That usage of the word "gun" to mean a crew-served firearm or cannon is more widespread than one would think, also. I'll relate an anecdote: At the North Gate of Mosul Airport in April of 2003, a kid of maybe 12 years old fired a few rounds at Marine positions with an AK-47. He ran and was followed home where he was subdued. An interrogator, who I knew personally, conducted his interrogation along with a native Arabic-speaking interpreter. The question was asked "Where did you get the gun"? To which the kid replied "It's not a gun , it's a rifle "

See? Even the Iraqis know this...

RyanM
March 18, 2005, 03:08 PM
Along the same lines, I also hate the term "gun". A 1911 isn't a gun. Neiter is a Remington 700 or an M-16. Those are pistols and rifles. A gun is a crew-served weapon. Like a M240G or a M155 howitzer. I know that in normal-person-speak "gun" is appropriate. It was just drummed in to my head so much in the Marines that it really irritates me now, though.

Specifically, guns have low, flat trajectories; mortars have high, arcing trajectories; and howitzers are somewheres in between. At least that's the way I heard it.

If "gun" means only the type of heavy artillery, though, then what the heck is the proper term for a shotgun? Shotfirearm? Shotweapon? Multi-projectile smoothbore shoulder-fired smallarm?

Gordon Fink
March 18, 2005, 03:33 PM
Sarge, you’re opening up a big ol’ semantical can of worms. :D

Since my hand-[crew-served weapon] has a rifled barrel, is it a rifle? If so, then my bolt-action “rifle” is really a rifled what?

~G. Fink

brian roberts
March 18, 2005, 04:45 PM
how's about: swing...swang...& swung...??

S Roper
March 18, 2005, 04:51 PM
The meaning of gun is all in the context.

"Sights" and "sites" is another one. I think this one is partially due to the play on words with Gunsite in AZ. However, I also see people use "sight" for website.

Gordon Fink
March 18, 2005, 05:09 PM
Can you cite any good sites about sights?

~G. Fink :evil:

Outbacker
March 18, 2005, 05:13 PM
Can you cite any good sites about sights?
Everyone together now, "Uuuuuuuuughhhhhhhhhhhh!" :)

All-Around-Shooter
March 18, 2005, 05:27 PM
Media Misuse:
Marines referred to as Soldiers.
Airmen Referred to as Soldiers.
Sailors and Soldiers referred to as Servicemen.
Combat wounded Marines,Soldiers,Sailors and Airmen referred to as injured.
Revolvers and pistols referred to as handguns.
Anything fired from a shotgun referred to as buckshot.
Shotguns referred to as rifles.
Rifles referred to as shotguns.
"point blank" "execution style" "armor piercing hollow points"
"junk guns" "assault rifles" "plastic guns" "cop killer bullets"
And so on...

The Rabbi
March 18, 2005, 06:17 PM
We're getting out of the realm of proper usage and into the realm of preference/nonsense.

A gun is anything that fires a projectile. I understand Navy types say it refers to something big, like on a ship, but that's their problem, not anyone else's.
A handgun is anything that you hold in your hand to fire. Pistols and revolvers ARE handguns.

vesmcd
March 18, 2005, 07:46 PM
I question the testerone level of anyone who uses the terms "Winnie, Remmy,Mossy,shottie" or any other of the assinine, Teletubby names they come up with to describe firearms.

vesmcd
March 18, 2005, 07:49 PM
Pardon me, I misspelled testosterone in my previous post.

scout26
March 18, 2005, 08:39 PM
"Jury of your Peers".

Only if your in Britain and titled. (This was to keep the peasants from convicting the Dukes, Barons, Earls, etc.)

Here in the US you are entitled to an "impartial jury" according to my seach of the internet for a copy of the US Constitution. (Which, by the way, is for sale on E-Bay :banghead: :barf: :banghead: :barf: :banghead: :barf: )

WvaBill
March 18, 2005, 11:14 PM
What's a little peerage among the Lords and Ladies of Ballistics?

Librarian
March 18, 2005, 11:37 PM
I don't think this is an error by WS - but the complaint may be a little bit of a troll...

JULIET
O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.

Juliet isn't asking where Romeo is - she wants to know why he has to be a member of the family that is enemy to hers.

But to forcibly drag this post onto gun things, I was rather impressed by the Luhrman Romeo + Giulieta (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117509/?fr=c2l0ZT1kZnx0dD1vbnxmYj11fHBuPTB8cT1yb21lbyBhbmQganVsaWV0fG14PTIwfGxtPTUwMHxodG1sPTE_;fc=1;ft=42;fm=1) and its use of 'Rapier' for the pistols the rowdies were carrying. The actual gun handling was no example to follow, but consistent with the story.

Clean97GTI
March 19, 2005, 12:39 AM
I yell at the TV every time I hear President Bush say nuke-you-ler.

I am usually very careful to call weapons by the correct name (for example: rifle, handgun or sidearm, shotgun)
The thing that bothers me the most is the absolute lack of punctuation on some internet forums.

someone will make a post that looks like this complete with run on sentences and no punctuation of any sort as well as a lack of capital letters :cuss:

It's like Hank Hill said "An F in English? Bobby, you speak English."

Folks who type so fast that they transpose letters but don't correct them.
*teh for the, fsat or fast, liek for like. I understand that we all make errors, but please fix them before broadcasting your stupidity over the internet.

I get even more upset when I correct someones grammar and they get mad and don't care. I guess thats where freedom of speech comes in.

4RHeritage
March 19, 2005, 02:18 AM
When I first joined the army, I almost got into a fist fight with the moronic corporal who was explaining the finer points of the FAL to me. He insisted that the flash eliminator was the flash "illuminator" :banghead:

Should have just called it a suppressor I guess :p

EghtySx
March 19, 2005, 03:29 AM
I have people at work that have to go through orientation. I really hate it when they say they have to "orientate" or be "orientated". Just sounds so stupid to me for some reason. And the corect terms are orient and oriented.

Oh ya, that nookyuler thing kinda grates on the nerves too.

hhmorant
March 19, 2005, 09:50 AM
I need to get some more bullet heads for my Dillion. What kind of heads should I get?

Sean85746
March 19, 2005, 02:54 PM
ALL of the above!

....with an all time favorite: "You don't 'posta do that"

Captain Crunch
March 19, 2005, 04:04 PM
Nobody has mentioned my favorites: "ordnance" and "ordinance".

bbrins
March 20, 2005, 12:04 AM
My biggest pet peeve is people who think they are better than someone because their spelling and grammar is better. Kinda makes me feel too stupid to post sometimes and it is probably one of the reasons why we have more lurkers on THR right now than members (308 guests to 193 members). As long as I know what I'm trying to say and you understand what I am trying to say, what is the problem?

I kind of understand that y'all are trying to keep up an image that gunowners aren't a bunch of ignorant hicks, but when it gets to the point that someone feels stupid because of it, you've gone too far.

Sorry for the rant, I'm in a bad mood today.

joebogey
March 20, 2005, 12:30 AM
My biggest pet peeve is people who think they are better than someone because their spelling and grammar is better.


+1

EghtySx
March 20, 2005, 12:48 AM
As long as I know what I'm trying to say and you understand what I am trying to say, what is the problem?


I don't think anyone has a real problem with it as no one mentions it to someone when they do it. We all speak a common language so we can communicate. The more mastery you have of a language the better you can express thoughts and ideas. Someone who posseses such skill is easier to listen to and understand. That doesn't mean having a larger vocabulary, just knowing how to correctly use the vocabulary you do have.

Rabid Rabbit
March 20, 2005, 05:31 AM
Comparing two items, one weighs 10 lbs. the other weighs 1 pound or 10 times less than the 10 lbs item. Its 1/10 not 10 times.

rust collector
March 20, 2005, 02:10 PM
You can't trademark or protect a term that's been widely used for hundreds of years, so now marketing types are inventing new spellings for old words. These abominations are hyped, then adopted by those who see the ads. Thus we have Baretta, the old TV show; "Nexis" by the legal publisher instead of Nexus; and Entreprise by the maker of FAL receivers, rather than enterprise. It does make it tough to keep the correct spelling in mind. And I've struggled with guage and gauge many times.

This pales in comparison to the amazing ways people are naming their children. I used to know how to spell Michael, but now it may be Mike L, Micheal, Mikal, Mykel, Mikel or Mikle. It's the "elegant variation" taken to the X-treem.

I don't think anyone is dissing people who have trouble with the language, as we all do on occasion. The concern is that American English is becoming more difficult to use, especially as a second language, due to idioms, creative spelling and IM-speak. Then again, read the chronicles of Lewis & Clark to see truly creative spelling. They did indeed succeed in getting their points across, and we are grateful.

Wildalaska
March 20, 2005, 02:23 PM
Then again, read the chronicles of Lewis & Clark to see truly creative spelling

Read pre Georgian English law books and read a foreign language.

The funny thing about all languages is the way they mutate, effforts to stop such mutation to the contrary. Ya listen to my wife speak japanese carefully enough and you hear the english, mostly reating to modern tech words...ya hear the same in lots of other languages..

WildlinguistAlaska

taliv
March 20, 2005, 02:45 PM
i had a friend in college who used to say "ammo-piercing bullets" (meaning of course, armor-piercing bullets. And of course, "turrent instead of turret"



as far as our living language is concerned, as a technologist, it's my opinion that English as it was WRITTEN 20 to 100 years ago just can't cut it anymore. It's too slow for today's media. It also lacks the ability to convey emotion and connotations we express with our body language and spoken inflections.

thus, we will continue to see dramatic changes in the near future as people try to cope with more medias like instant messaging by creating abbreviations and dropping capital letters (which are very annoying on cell phones and other SMS type input devices.)

obviously, there's a big difference between some of these changes for expediency and your typical abominations (ebonics, and your garden variety mistakes like you're/your, that just show ignorance.

mack69
March 20, 2005, 05:44 PM
Pax..your back..ummm...err....you're back.....uhhhh....yur back.....yer dangit....welcome back.....hehehehehe :D ....mack

Tory
March 20, 2005, 06:26 PM
dangerous conclusion:

"As long as I know what I'm trying to say and you understand what I am trying to say, what is the problem?:

Here are TWO potential problems for your review:

1. People making such egregious mistakes may well NOT really understand what they are saying. If they can't speak a thought clearly, what makes you believe they can formulate one clearly?

2. Given that the speaker is misusing terms, it necessarily follows that the speaker thus increases the likelihood of the listener misunderstanding the message. :uhoh:

In other words, Garbage in; garbage out. :rolleyes:

taliv
March 20, 2005, 09:02 PM
right tory; it's like that study "they" did where they used the outlines of letters above and below the lines to show the shape of the words without using the actual letters, and people were still able to read them easily.

shld we drp th vwls frm sntncs? just because we can still read them? uhh, no.

but we can still improve the usability of the language without sacrificing things that maintain a margin for error on comprehension.

jlwatts3
March 21, 2005, 03:10 PM
Lately, I've noticed people on this forum spelling "lose" as "loose". Example: You will "loose" your money in a lawsuit.

jacketch
March 22, 2005, 07:21 AM
Prolly better keep it firearm related.

geojap
March 22, 2005, 07:56 AM
I have two huge pet peeves.

Wrong: Nucular (noo-cue-lar). :banghead: It's nuclear (noo-clee-ar), you rusticated sons of the earth. :D That immediately tells me that someone isn't educated. :uhoh: GW says that all the time and it makes my skin crawl when I hear it coming from our president. :rolleyes: :scrutiny:

Also the corruption of Mosin-Nagant, Moiseen or Moisin. It's Mosin. End of story.

The Rabbi
March 22, 2005, 10:24 AM
Wrong: Nucular (noo-cue-lar). It's nuclear (noo-clee-ar), you rusticated sons of the earth.

No, its pronounced nukular. As in,
If them slant-eyed North Koreans dont get their hearts right we'll just drop a big ole nukular bum on they'r butts.

The WSJ just had an article yesterday on how GW is changing how he expresses himself and toning down the accent.
They mentioned that he has started pronouncing the word "our" to rhyme with "hour". Frankly I thought it was always pronounced the same, to rhyme with
"fire" and also "far."

Andrew Rothman
March 22, 2005, 12:13 PM
Turns out that the Star Tribune (http://startribune.com/stories/389/5298568.html) newspaper is good for something other than bird cage lining! Who knew?

Here is a quick tour of other English words and expressions that folks often unwittingly botch, chew up and abuse, compiled by staff writer Bill Dawson, with assistance from some of the newsroom's pickiest wordsmiths: John Addington, Ben Welter, Bill Hammond, Paul Walsh and Sarah T. Williams.

Gail Rosenblum, Variety Team Leader

1 "Jim Turner not only came back to his old stomping grounds; he's living in them." Should read, "old stamping grounds," but don't feel bad if this one stumps you. Most people get it wrong.

2 "Local children vow to staunch the flow of drugs and alcohol." Purists say it's "stanch" the flow, although some dictionaries accept "staunch." More confusing, the words are usually pronounced the same (stawnch).

3 "My siblings and I would pour over the pages until they were dog-eared and tattered." Pour is a poor choice here, unless you're pouring honey on the text. (And that would be an even poorer choice, kids.) The correct spelling is pore.

4 "It was just a fluke that the car went off the road and hit that oak tree, demolishing the vehicle." Purists reserve the use of "fluke" for strokes of good luck, not acts of misfortune.

5. "We are chomping at the bit to have this deal closed." If you said "chomp," you're neither a chump nor a champ. "Champing" is right, but few people know it.

6 "Yesterday, little Oliver asked for more oatmeal, and I had to sick the dog on him." You only "sick" (sic) your dog if you give him germs, and that would be cruel and grammatically wrong.

7 "I saw my reflection and realized I was butt naked!" Time to, uh, expose this for what it is -- wrong. Bare tushie or not, "buck naked" is the correct wording.

8. "I could care less about elitist liberal ramblings."

• Don't get careless by using the incorrect "care less," when you actually mean "couldn't" care less.

9. "It doesn't phase me that the party doesn't support vouchers. It phases me that the senator says taxes are going to be raised."

• You'll get an A if you write the word with an F, as in faze.

10. "The image of a deeply torn Israel doesn't jive with reality."

• Jive (wrong) doesn't jibe (right) with this usage. So we're giving you a little gibe (taunt) about it.

Also mangled and misused

• Enormousness, not enormity. Enormity means excessive wickedness. Enormousness refers to size.

• Nonplussed. Although it means perplexed or bewildered, nonplussed is often believed to mean just the opposite--calm, unruffled, cool-as-a-cucumber.

• Penultimate. Meaning "next to last," penultimate is often mistakenly used to mean "the very last," or the ultimate.

• Fortuitous. Means accidental; not lucky, and not luckily accidental. To use it like that is a malapropism. Serendipitous is the word you need in those situations.

• Aggravate. Means to worsen; irritate means to annoy. Don't use aggravate when you mean irritate.

As long as we're at it:

More importantly (More important is correct).

Irregardless (Regardless is correct).

Running the gauntlet (Gantlet is correct).

A prized momento from Grandma (correct: Memento. The root is based on memory, not moment).

Reins (leather straps)/Reigns (What a queen does).

Alot (No such word. It's two words: "a lot").

Principal" and "principle" are constantly confused. Hint: The school principal is your pal. Unless he or she is suspending your kid, which would be the principal (as in "primary") reason to take away the car keys. That, by the way, would be a principled approach by Mom and Dad.

Capital (the city) vs. Capitol (the building), which we capitalize.

Hanger (for clothes)/Hangar (for airplanes).

Bridal path (Actually, it's bridle).

Effect/Affect: Usually, the first is the noun, the latter the verb.

Stationary (motionless)/Stationery (writing paper).

Breech (part of a gun; also, buttocks)/Breach (an infraction).

Sheer (transparently thin)/Shear (to cut).

Horde (a crowd)/Hoard (what kids do with a bag of popcorn).

Flair (natural talent)/Flare (to blaze)

Deja vu: It's not that you did experience something, only that you felt that you did.

You can say that again

Phenomena is plural/Phenomenon is singular.

Media is plural/Medium is singular.

Kudos means "praise," and is not a plural noun. So don't say "He gave me a kudo." No such word, my friend.

gearbox
March 22, 2005, 03:18 PM
How about this kernel, Colonel?

gearbox
March 22, 2005, 03:32 PM
I'd amsolt rthear raed it wtih the wdros cpletelmoy jmbleud up. You can sltil ustrenadnd waht I'm syiang, and I konw waht I'm snyaig, so waht's the dcrefnefie?

Mr. James
March 22, 2005, 06:25 PM
A few random peeves...

"The media is biased!" Media are... (sg: medium)

"The data is not available." Data are... (sg: datum)

Oh, and combustible materials are inflammable, not "flammable." We're so stoopid, for safety's sake everyone simply dropped the "in," lest us unwashed moe-rons think it meant "not."

And one of my all time favorites was the District of Columbia official who actually lost his job for using - correctly - the word "niggardly." (After much garment rending and harrumphing from the lettered class, the dismissal was rescinded.)

Shweboner
March 22, 2005, 06:44 PM
Gun auctions that advertise "Colt For Sell" or "Saleing a kimber" really drive me nuts.

a little OT but what really gets to me is when you are on an auction site and people list something like a jennings or some POS you arent searching for... and the put " Not glock colt or kimber" so when you are searching for something of higher quality THEIR crap comes up in the search results!!!! :fire: :fire:

Secondly, The misuse of the word DECIMATED. People use it to describe a complete destruction. Decimation means 10% notice the deci part of the word....


Last but not least, and I am surprised this one has not been mentioned yet...

B A N A N A C L I P holy crap, I want to burn people alive when they say BANANA CLIP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I cannot stand it.

geojap
March 22, 2005, 07:25 PM
a little OT but what really gets to me is when you are on an auction site and people list something like a jennings or some POS you arent searching for... and the put " Not glock colt or kimber" so when you are searching for something of higher quality THEIR crap comes up in the search results!!!!

I completely agree. Weasels.

Librarian
March 22, 2005, 11:20 PM
"massive"

It's not a synonym for "large"; it means "the quality of having mass".

There cannot be a "massive earthquake" - energy release does not produce mass. One cannot experience a "massive heart attack".

In Massachussetts, one can experience "Mass-ive legislative incompetence", I suppose. California has more than a reasonable share of legislative incompetence, but it is "widespread", "horrible", and "depressing", not massive.

Outbacker
March 23, 2005, 03:53 AM
Wrong: Nucular (noo-cue-lar). It's nuclear (noo-clee-ar), you rusticated sons of the earth.

No, its pronounced nukular.

The pronunciation (noo-kyoo-lur), which is generally considered incorrect, is an example of how a familiar phonological pattern can influence an unfamiliar one. The usual pronunciation of the final two syllables of this word is (-klee-ur), but this sequence of sounds is rare in English. Much more common is the similar sequence (-kyoo-lur), which occurs in words like particular, circular, spectacular, and in many scientific words like molecular, ocular, and vascular.

However rare the phonological pattern, the correct pronunciation of "nuclear" is noo-klee-ur, despite what both common vernacular (bad pun!) and Homer Simpson would dictate.

pilroler
March 23, 2005, 12:30 PM
"the front site is mounted just behind the muzzle break"


These two are quite common in the gun rags, where the writers are assumed to be professional communicators. Oh well.

Several excellent points made in the post. Clarity in expressing thought, especially in technical areas, is critical in modern life. With that said language is a living,growing and constantly changing entity and coping with change is a requirement for the "good" life.

IIRC many of our current 4 letter words were common and acceptable in Anglo-Saxon english. After the Norman conquest the French-speaking rulers made them unusable in polite society. Who knows what our great-grandchildren will understand of todays e-mails etc?

Stevie-Ray
March 23, 2005, 10:29 PM
"massive"

It's not a synonym for "large"; it means "the quality of having mass". Oh?

1. Consisting of or making up a large mass; bulky: a massive piece of furniture 2. Unusually large or impressive: a massive head 3. Large or imposing in quantity, scope, degree, or scale: a massive undertaking 4. Med. Large in comparison to the usual amount:a massive dose 5. Pathol Affecting a large area of bodily tissue, widespread and severe: massive gangrene

Pretty much all seem to mean large.

Librarian
March 23, 2005, 11:46 PM
Pretty much all seem to mean large. Then I think one ought to expand one's practical vocabulary and say large.
Or say ample, barn door, blimp, booming, broad, bulky, capacious, colossal, comprehensive, considerable, copious, doozer, enormous, excessive, exorbitant, extensive, extravagant, full, generous, giant, gigantic, goodly, grand, grandiose, great, gross, hefty, huge, humongous, immeasurable, immense, jumbo, king-size, liberal, massive, monumental, mountainous, mungo, plentiful, populous, roomy, sizable, skookum, spacious, stupendous, substantial, super, sweeping, thumping, tidy, vast, voluminous, whopping, wide.

It's a peeve thread, y'know? Besides, my on-line dictionary says
mas·sive adj.
1. Consisting of or making up a large mass; bulky, heavy, and solid: a massive piece of furniture.

I take 'first definitions' as the more common, most acceptable.

2. Large or imposing, as in quantity, scope, degree, intensity, or scale: “Local defense must be reinforced by the further deterrent of massive retaliatory power” (John Foster Dulles). See Synonyms at heavy.

Well, I won't argue with John Foster Dulles, but I would have been more likely to have used 'overwhelming'.

3. Large in comparison with the usual amount: a massive dose of a drug.

'Overdose' is adequate.

4. Pathology. Affecting a large area of bodily tissue; widespread and severe: massive gangrene.

'Widespread and severe' seems appropriate.

5. Mineralogy. Lacking internal crystalline structure; amorphous.
6. Geology. Without internal structure or layers and homogeneous in composition. Used of a rock.

pax
March 24, 2005, 12:26 AM
Gun related.

(This thread is becoming massively off topic ....) ;)

pax

If you do not use correct grammar, people will lose respect for you, and they will burn down your house. -- Dave Barry

sm
March 24, 2005, 12:47 AM
Since I am not that smart...

Disclaimer: The following is C&P from the site listed. Any mistakes are theirs - not mine. Gets the thread back on topic and covers my rear end. :)

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=gun

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=gun

7 entries found for gun.
gun Audio pronunciation of "gun" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (gn)
n.

1. A weapon consisting of a metal tube from which a projectile is fired at high velocity into a relatively flat trajectory.
2. A cannon with a long barrel and a relatively low angle of fire.
3. A portable firearm, such as a rifle or revolver.
4. A device resembling a firearm or cannon, as in its ability to project something, such as grease, under pressure or at great speed.
5. A discharge of a firearm or cannon as a signal or salute.
6. One, such as a hunter, who carries or uses a gun.
7.
1. A person skilled in the use of a gun.
2. A professional killer: a hired gun.
8. The throttle of an engine, as of an automobile.


v. gunned, gun·ning, guns
v. tr.

1. To shoot (a person): a bank robber who was gunned down by the police.
2. To open the throttle of (an engine) so as to accelerate: gunned the engine and sped off.
3. Maine. To hunt (game).


v. intr.

To hunt with a gun.


Phrasal Verb:
gun for

1. To pursue relentlessly so as to overcome or destroy.
2. To go after in earnest; set out to obtain: gunning for a promotion.


Idioms:
go great guns

To proceed or perform with great speed, skill, or success.

hold a gun to (someone's) head

To put pressure on someone.

under the gun

Under great pressure or under threat.


[Middle English gonne, cannon, short for Gunilda, woman's name applied to a siege engine, from Old Norse Gunnhildr, woman's name : gunnr, war; see gwhen- in Indo-European Roots + hildr, war.]

[Download or Buy Now]
Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gun

In addition to the idiom beginning with gun, also see at gunpoint; big cheese (gun); great guns; hired gun; hold a gun to someone's head; jump the gun; smoking gun; son of a bitch (gun); stick to one's guns; under the gun.

Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

gun

n 1: a weapon that discharges a missile at high velocity (especially from a metal tube or barrel) 2: large but transportable armament [syn: artillery, heavy weapon, ordnance] 3: a person who shoots a gun (as regards their ability) [syn: gunman] 4: a professional killer who uses a gun [syn: gunman, gunslinger, hired gun, gun for hire, triggerman, hit man, hitman, torpedo, shooter] 5: a hand-operated pump that resembles a gun; forces grease into parts of a machine [syn: grease-gun] 6: a pedal that controls the throttle valve; "he stepped on the gas" [syn: accelerator, accelerator pedal, gas pedal, gas, throttle] 7: the discharge of a gun as signal or as a salute in military ceremonies; "a twenty gun salute" v : shoot with a gun

Source: WordNet ® 2.0, © 2003 Princeton University

gun



<jargon> (ITS, from the ":GUN" command) To forcibly
terminate a program or job (computer, not career). "Some
idiot left a background process running soaking up half the
cycles, so I gunned it."

Compare can.

(1995-02-27)

Source: The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © 1993-2004 Denis Howe

gun

vt. [ITS, now rare: from the `:GUN' command] To forcibly
terminate a program or job (computer, not career). "Some idiot left
a background process running soaking up half the cycles, so I gunned
it." Usage: now rare. Compare can, blammo.

Gordon Fink
March 24, 2005, 01:23 AM
Here’s another one: “shot and killed.” Was the victim shot and then killed by some other means? Correctly, it should be “shot dead” or “shot to death.”

~G. Fink

RyanM
March 24, 2005, 08:10 PM
Just thought of another. People that...use...an inordinate number of...ellipses. I guess...they're trying for...a kind of...stream of...thought...type...thing...but they...only...end up...sounding like...William........................................Shatner.

Really annoying. Just as bad as no punctuation whatsoever, in terms of readability.

Stevie-Ray
March 24, 2005, 10:09 PM
(This thread is becoming massively off topic ....)

paxHey pax, how about this? The Yamato packed a MASSIVE 18 inch main battery. ;)

Too Many Choices!?
March 24, 2005, 10:24 PM
The term "assualt weapon" :cuss: It could be a spoon if I assault you with it!!!!
Assault rifle and "assault weapon" used interchangabley !!!!!!
When anybody ever talks bad about a caliber that they would not stand in front of!!!!!

Too Many Choices!?
March 24, 2005, 10:26 PM
:uhoh: ....... :neener: ........ :) ....

Librarian
March 25, 2005, 01:51 AM
The Yamato packed a MASSIVE 18 inch main battery. How many volts do you get from one of those? (But we all know it's the amps that'll kill you.)
Their nine 460mm (18.1-inch) main battery guns, which fired 1460kg (3200 pound) armor piercing shells, were the largest battleship guns ever to go to sea In this case, I'll have to go along with massive. :neener:

iapetus
March 25, 2005, 09:03 AM
I've seen a number of newspapers in the UK recently talking about "semiautomatic machineguns". (E.g. The Mirror , in an article about the recent school shooting, claimed that in America "Anyone can walk into a gun shop and come out with a handgun and a semiautomatic machinegun for $100". I think they also said there was no need for a background check).

Johnny Guest
February 12, 2006, 02:41 AM
"Rounds of brass" - - Nope, if it's an empty cartridge case, fine, call it that. But a "round of ammunition" is the entire cartridge - - Case, bullet, primer, powder.

"Site" and "Sight" are both good words, but not interchangeable. SITE is a place or location. Website is okay. WebSIGHT is not. A "Sight" is a 'view" or, sometimes, a viewing place, which we extend to indicate the means by which we aim a firearm.

The abbreviation for "do not" is "don't," not "do'nt."

I still crusade for the proper use of "Stock" as the part of the firearm, either handgun or shoulder arm, which is gripped by the hand. The AREA which is gripped (in the manner in which a pistol is held) is properly called the "pistol grip" but this is a description of the type hold. This would be confusing enough without certain manufacturers stating they make "handgun grips." I guess they can call their product whatever they want, though.

A few of many.

Johnny

MEDDAC19
February 12, 2006, 03:23 AM
How about all those people that try to catch a deer or other game? I am trying to kill those critters, or should I be PC and harvest one?

MTMilitiaman
February 12, 2006, 04:10 AM
Your and You're. I can't stand it when people mix these two up.

Yes! It took until page two but I am not the only one! This just burns me up and I don't know why. I notice it every time it happens and it makes me want to strangle something.

And I am surprised that in six pages, no one has mentioned "grammer" instead of "grammar."

To keep this loosely gun related, I hate it when people use "millimeter" and "caliber" interchangeably. I've heard people refer to 38 mm revolvers when they obviously meant .38 caliber and it drives me nuts.

And finally, even if this topic is closed, I have learned stuff from it, so I want to thank you all for an interesting bit of reading. I pride myself with being able to communicate but I know I error and sometimes my language confuses even me. Thanks again.

iapetus
February 12, 2006, 05:59 AM
To keep this loosely gun related, I hate it when people use "millimeter" and "caliber" interchangeably. I've heard people refer to 38 mm revolvers when they obviously meant .38 caliber and it drives me nuts.


That reminds me of a time my local newspaper was reporting on some guns that the London police had siezed from some local gangsters.

They kept refering to their Beretta pistols alternately as "9 caliber" and ".9mm".

rms/pa
February 12, 2006, 06:59 AM
touched on briefly, but needs hammered deeply into the wood.

Calgary : a city in North America.

Calvary :the site of the crucifiction of Jesus.

cavalry : horse mounted troops, not to be confused with dragoons,or dragons.

rms/pa

oh blanky
February 12, 2006, 07:47 AM
For all intensive purrposes this is becoming a mute poynt.

As our edumacation sistem decides not to hurt the delikat stoodents feelings by korrecting them, we must just lern to deel with it.

mrmeval
February 12, 2006, 07:53 AM
Git yer Roscoe out boys its gonna be fun.

I'm not really stirring the pot so much as trying to standardize our etymology :) Ok, so I'm stirring the pot.

Anyhow, at least 5 times in the last 2 days I've seen people spell grenade as "gernade". That ranks right up there on the skin-crawling chart as nukular and clip vs. magazine.

Any terminology gaffes I'm missing here?

Richard.Howe
February 12, 2006, 07:54 AM
nu-kya-lur

deadin
February 12, 2006, 08:39 AM
I got me a set of them karate 'numb chucks.'

I don't know. The first time I played with a set of them, I numbed my chucks.:D

Dean

FunYet
February 12, 2006, 08:40 AM
I often see "then" used as the spelling of "than" on the forum, for example "more often then not".

old4x4
February 12, 2006, 10:23 AM
If you're lost, you're disoriented, not DISORIENTATED.:banghead:

Drives me nuts, along with the aforementioned irregardless.

Break-to destroy something
Brake-to stop or slow something or the device that does it. Muzzle brake, not muzzle break!

m14rick
February 12, 2006, 10:37 AM
Most of my peeves have been covered, but I haven't seen "bodily fluids". These are the fluids that contaminate a shooting scene (firearm related !). I always thought they were body fluids, but, I could be wrong....Oh, and exscape, as in : the shooter escaped.

WhiteKnight
February 12, 2006, 10:47 AM
An old sig of mine said it for me.

The word is have. Could HAVE. Would HAVE. Should HAVE. Not could OF. Should OF. Would OF.

That drives me up a wall.

I think that this is actually people who hear the contraction "would've" (would + have) and "could've" (could + have) or "should've" (should + have) think that it is actually two words like "would of" (actually "would've).

When they attempt to write it on the internet they don't realize that it's actually a contraction instead of two distinct words.

Husker1911
February 12, 2006, 10:49 AM
Dang! I read six pages of this thread, only to find rms/pa hammering home the misuse of Calvary. Christ died on Calvary. Calvary is NOT a mounted military force. That would be the cavalry. Savvy?

1911 guy
February 12, 2006, 11:25 AM
"Set" behind my machinegun, pulling the pins on "gernades" while I call for the "Calvary" to stop a "nucular" 'splosion? Darn. Guess I'll just have to stay home and practice my numb chuck skills. I'm gonna be a cage fighter, you know.

Grape Ape
February 12, 2006, 11:58 AM
The past tense of plead is pled, not pleaded. I’m not sure what journalism majors are supposed to be leaning, but you think they could cover that one.

I just wish that Glock would sell me one of those 40mm Glock service revolvers I hear about on the news.

Misspelled auction titles can be a good thing if you search for them. You might be the only bidder and get a great deal on a Del notbook computor. :evil:

Hawkmoon
February 12, 2006, 08:46 PM
Can I axe you a question about your sangwich?

:banghead:
You aren't from Noo Yawk. Quit pretending.

meef
February 12, 2006, 09:08 PM
nu-kya-lur
Couldn't agree more. It's a terrible thing to hear the President of the United States mispronouncing that one.

But the all-time-takes-the-cake-mispronouncer of that puppy was none other than President Jimmy "the peanut" Carter. I used to go into spasms of agony whenever he said:

"new-kee-uhh" -- or whatever the hell butchering of the English language it was that erupted from his mouth when he tried to say it.

The greater irony is contained herein regarding part of his naval career:

Chosen by Admiral Hyman Rickover for the nuclear submarine program, he was assigned to Schenectady, N.Y., where he took graduate work at Union College in reactor technology and nuclear physics, and served as senior officer of the pre-commissioning crew of the Seawolf, the second nuclear submarine.
Hoo boy, I can just see it now - educated people all around him bouncing off the walls like steelies in a pinball machine everytime he spewed "new-kee-uhh, new-kee-uhh, new-kee-uhh".

Or maybe it's just me.....:banghead:

Agh! Arrrgh! Gag! Ack! Blecch! Yack!

new-kee-uhh....... :: run away!!!! ::

JohnKSa
February 12, 2006, 09:19 PM
WARNING! BEFORE reading farther, please read the disclaimer at the end of the post.But the all-time-takes-the-cake-mispronouncer of that puppy was none other than President Jimmy "the peanut" Carter.I heard him pronounce it THREE different ways in a single speech.

What's worse, he served on a nuclear submarine and did post-graduate work in nuclear physics and technology. :rolleyes:

Red Dragon
February 12, 2006, 09:28 PM
Sergeant Sabre said:
"I could care less" <--- So you must care some then, right? Because if you couldn't care less that means you don't care at all, which is what I think you were trying to say.

One way that would make the phrase "I could care less" have the intended meaning is when it is used in an obvious sarcastic tone, but otherwise I agree that in most cases it is used incorrectly.

Of course, if we get into too much analysis of phrases such as these than we would have to start breaking down the absurdity of phrases like, " I don't give a rat's a$$" or "Like I give a s#!t"

v35
February 12, 2006, 09:40 PM
Since the thread has migrated so far from terminology to basic grammar I'll add my $0.02...

Confusion between the contraction "it's" and the possessive pronoun "its".

The fact that so many have answered this post using the correct version speaks volumes about the level of education among THR's participants.

default
February 13, 2006, 12:11 AM
My own personal peeve is the death of the adverb.

When even professional communicators and writers describe people as "running quick" it's time to just heave the style manual into the garbage real quick. :rolleyes:

Not on the topic of firearms but you'll like this. An old high-school friend of mine told me this story after applying for his driver's license.

He was at the DMV filling out forms for his license application. The cranky lady behind the counter pointed out a spelling error he had made on one of the forms. Her irritated question: "Why dont'cha learn how to spell correct?". His reply? "Why don't you learn how to use adverbs correct...ly?" :D

Charles Lowry
February 13, 2006, 04:54 AM
"spartacus2002"---"anything for sale that is described using the adjective "tactical"

AMEN!!! Before long they'll be marketing tactical toilet paper, watches, caps, underwear, ad nauseum! I've been shooting for 40 years or more and have done as well eschewing anything described as "tactical".

Another is "ballistic"! "Buy Joe's Sling! Far Superior To Any Other Because It's Made With BALLISTIC NYLON!!!"

I guess terms such as these give some of us a chance to play GI Joe on the weekend, or at least LOOK like deadly 1000 yard snipers. After all, we've got a "tactical' spittoon at the range. I've seen people show up at a range with every tactical accoutrement just dripping off their rifles. They'd spend the whole day walking around so everybody could see what a fine tactical, ballistic Star Wars weapon they had, and never even shoot!

BigG
February 13, 2006, 07:04 AM
People who say "nucular" instead of "nuclear."

How bout Pres. Carta, who pronounced it new-kyer? as in new-kyer periferation? :neener:

BTW - a nuke is the biggest gun there is. ;)

Charles Lowry
February 13, 2006, 08:15 AM
HA! I beleve that Jimmy was a good man at heart, but he shot himself in the foot during one debate with Reagan. One of the moderators asked both candidates to explain what they thought was the biggest threat to world peace. Jimmy got the first shot at the question.

He said, and I'm paraphrasing, "When I was leaving the hotel tonight, I asked my daughter, Amy(then about 13) what she thought was the biggest threat to world peace. She answered, 'Nu-kyer proliferation'."

Reagan was very respectful, even agreeing with Carter, but you could tell he KNEW he had the election in the bag!! That comment blew Carter's credibility out of the water!

Declaration Day
February 13, 2006, 08:47 AM
I get sick of hearing all of the slang for guns and shooting.

Heat = gun
Gat = gun
Packin' = carrying a weapon
"Hot" someone = to shoot someone
Clip = magazine
Bust a cap = fire a round

If everyone used proper and professional sounding words to refer to firearms, I think the image would be better. Thankfully this forum is filled with people that use words like firearm, weapon, and magazine.

Amen!

I had a "friend", actually my wife's best friend's husband, who used to ask me if I was "heatered".

I responded "Yes, I am carrying a pistol." He always laughed and thought I was joking.

We don't talk to them anymore. That story is a whole new thread.

JohnKSa
February 13, 2006, 09:57 PM
WARNING! BEFORE reading farther, please read the disclaimer at the end of the post.

Got a new one...

Biathlon has only ONE 'a'.

Hardtarget
February 13, 2006, 10:40 PM
There are many words in the language that sound the same.The problem comes when they're written. One that I hear is "bring" and "take". It's easy to use these wrong. It bugs me the way they get mixed.

I know I make plenty of mistakes when I post, even though I try to catch and correct by reading my reply before I click the submit button.

I probably even messed up this reply.
Mark.

Roadkill Coyote
February 14, 2006, 02:03 AM
Errors proliferate because, in most online fora, volume tends to trump precision. The most accurate typist's post is usually buried six to twelve pages ago. You might as well get used to it. :neener:

Nematocyst
February 14, 2006, 03:10 AM
In the spirit of critique,
in a similar vein as "two v. to v. too",
similar to "their v. there v. they're",
I offer then v. than.

Examples of improper usage:

If I don't buy this gun, than I will not be able to defend myself.

.45 ACP is a better gun then 9mm.
________

Examples of proper usage.

If I don't aim properly, then the deer will not fall and I will not eat venison.
{Note: if, then is a pair; if something, then something else.}

7mm08 has a flatter trajectory than .308 over longer distance.
{Note: 'than' is used in comparisons; something is <bigger, badder, smaller, less volatile, more impressive...> than something else.

One does not need to be an 'English major' to use these words correctly.

:neener:

Nem, the biologist

Houndawg
February 14, 2006, 03:22 AM
The use of "quite" to refer to the sound level of an item. I see it quite often on computer boards. Somebody will say something like, "That Antec power supply is really quite."

Organic fruits and vegetables. What the hell else would they be, you freaking hippy?

Bruce in West Oz
February 14, 2006, 04:11 AM
If I don't aim properly, then the deer will not fall and I will not eat venison.
{Note: if, then is a pair; if something, then something else.}

Sorry, Nem, have to disagree there.

The "if" will stand quite happily by itself, without the necessity for "then".

If I don't aim properly, the deer will not fall and I will not eat venison.

The "if - then" nexus appears have gained popularity and credence as a result of computer logic statements; e.g. "if x = 4 then y = yes".

(Oh, and punctuation, especially using quotation marks, differs from country to country, as you will have noticed above.)

"high calibre" makes me annoyed; e.g. "He used a high calibre handgun". What's wrong with "large"?

Bruce, the editor

tommygunm1a1
February 14, 2006, 04:17 AM
"...so we don't get french benefits?"

The ones that get me to cringe the most are: Clip when they mean magazine, and semi automatic assualt rifle( an oxymoron that doesn't exist), and semi automatic pistol instead of just pistol (vs. a revolver)

Nematocyst
February 14, 2006, 04:27 AM
The "if" will stand quite happily by itself, without the necessity for "then". Bruce, no apology necessary. I agree. Didn't mean to imply otherwise. "If" is a great word. My intention was only to demonstrate the proper meaning of the word "then". Without an "if", "then" is meaningless, IMO.

The "if - then" nexus appears have gained popularity and credence as a result of computer logic statements; e.g. "if x = 4 then y = yes". We agree there, also. Please help me understand, though, a use of the word "then" that doesn't depend upon "if" (at least implicitly). If you can offer such an example, then I will be enlightened. :D

(Oh, and punctuation, especially using quotation marks, differs from country to country, as you will have noticed above.) Once again, we agree.

I use 'single quotes' instead of "double quotes" out of laziness. One less keystroke; saves a "shift". The exception is in a case where I must quote something within a quote. As in this example, written as if I was quoting the New York Times: "Mr. Cheney, when asked about the accident, allegedly said, 'Oh, good grief, it was only bird shot.' "

"high calibre" makes me annoyed; e.g. "He used a high calibre handgun". What's wrong with "large"? Totally agree.

Bruce, the editor Bro, that makes two of us. :cool:

Nem, editor at large

MarkDido
February 14, 2006, 09:25 AM
OK, I'll play.....

"....the ship floundered off the coast of Florida"

Ships FOUNDER

A FLOUNDER is a flat fish! :neener:

iapetus
February 14, 2006, 03:24 PM
"spartacus2002"---"anything for sale that is described using the adjective "tactical"

AMEN!!! Before long they'll be marketing tactical toilet paper, watches, caps, underwear, ad nauseum! I've been shooting for 40 years or more and have done as well eschewing anything described as "tactical".

Another is "ballistic"! "Buy Joe's Sling! Far Superior To Any Other Because It's Made With BALLISTIC NYLON!!!"



That reminds me of something I saw advertised in a gun magazine: "Hostage Rescue Team" boots.

I'm not sure if "hostage rescue team" was the name of the manufacturers, or the name of the boots themselves, or the new "tactical", but it would be daft whichever it was.

SixForSure
February 14, 2006, 03:35 PM
How about "put your John Henry by the X" No, it is John Hancock stemming from his large, prominent signature on the Declaration of Independence.

Herself
February 14, 2006, 03:42 PM
So what's any a' this meanta those've us who type, at times, in the vernacular? ...Or who don't type well? Or who know how to spell and occasionally miss correcting the errors....

As much fun as it is to leap all over misuseages when they happen, it is generally better to give folks the benefit of the doubt while snickering quietly to one's self. English is finicky tool, liable to turn in the user's hands and gouge out a pound of flesh just when it seems most biddable.

--H

Mal H
February 14, 2006, 03:53 PM
Ok, as long as this thread is still alive and most of my abuse-of-the-language peeves have already been stated, most more than once, I'll add one I was reminded of by Houndawg's "organic fruits and vegetables" one (that's one of mine also).

How about "aerobic exercises"? And what other type would there be?

Personally, I prefer anaerobic exercises. I find it exhilerating to do 50 jumping jacks in a complete vacuum, because it feels so good when the oxygen is released back into the room!

ambush
February 14, 2006, 03:54 PM
My wife always accuses me of going off on a "tingent":scrutiny: That one always makes me cringe. After 15 years of being married, I know better than to correct her.

Carl N. Brown
February 14, 2006, 04:02 PM
I warsh my car in the yard.

Only damyankees wahsh their cahs in the yahd.

Nematocyst
February 14, 2006, 04:03 PM
So what's any a' this meanta those've us who type, at times, in the vernacular? ...Or who don't type well? Or who know how to spell and occasionally miss correcting the errors....

As much fun as it is to leap all over misuseages when they happen, it is generally better to give folks the benefit of the doubt while snickering quietly to one's self. I agree, --H.

When reading in a 'regular thread', I tend to keep my comments to myself about spelling, punctuation, grammar, word use and the like. I don't pick points. (OK, I did once a long time ago after first joining, but got over it.)

But in this thread, we're venting a bit, with the hope that when folks do have the time (which is not always), they'll take a little time to edit. I try to reread & edit everything I write, both before (note the 'preview' button just to the right of the 'submit' button) and after submitting (note the 'edit' button at the bottom of each post). It's not uncommon for me to reread and edit a post several times, especially when I'm trying to make myself clear. (For example, I've made about a dozen corrections in this one already.)

Yes, editing takes a bit of time for the writer, but if s/he doesn't write carefully, then it takes time away from the readerS (potentially dozens) trying to parse what was said.

Hypothetical example: I didn't buy th egun becase it was to expensive, more then I wanted to pay.

Example corrected: I didn't buy the gun because it was too expensive, more than I wanted to pay.

I'm a slow reader. Parsing the first version above would require an extra second or so to parse what the writer was saying.

Again, in a regular thread about a topic that I care about, I take the time to parse words, even poorly written ones.

But it's great to read well-written posts.

Nem

Nematocyst
February 14, 2006, 04:22 PM
How about "aerobic exercises"? And what other type would there be?

Personally, I prefer anaerobic exercises. I find it exhilerating to do 50 jumping jacks in a complete vacuum, because it feels so good when the oxygen is released back into the room! HAHAHAHAHAHAAHHAHA!!!! :D

Oh, thanks, Mal. First really good laugh I've had in a couple of days. I needed that. Very glad I wasn't drinking coffee when I read it. My monitor would have been caffeine coated. :D

But in reality, I gotta pick a minor semantic point with you. At least some of my exercise manuals do distinguish between aerobic & anaerobic exercise. (Notably this one (http://www.warriorforce.com/warriorfitness.html). That author is not as much of a flake as it may look on first glance. The guy's got some really good exercises that work, and they're very cheap and can be done anywhere with no to minimal equipment.)

Admittedly, it IS a bit of a misnomer because ALL exercise requires breathing. But 'anaerobic' usually denotes exercise involving heavier than normal breathing, where one is past that aerobic zone where your muscle tissues are getting all the oxygen they need.

If you push those muscles hard enough, you get into a realm where the tissues are having to generate ATP by anaerobic means because they're not getting enough to do it by normal means (which requires oxygen). After such exercise, one's breathing remains labored and heavy while that oxygen debt is paid back.

For example, jogging, weight lifting, and dancing the two-step is mostly aerobic, while sprints and a long set of jumping jacks can get anaerobic.

Still, I totally agree with you. The lingo IS confusing, a semantic tangle.

As a biologist, I also have a few thoughts about the very real semantic tangle about the term "organic fruits and veges", but I'll save those for another day...;)

Nem

bowfin
February 14, 2006, 04:22 PM
I don't like "Shottie" for a shotgun. Do they call their pistols "pissies"? I guess the proponents think a nickname gives them an air of a longtime familiarity with their shotguns.

Putting an apostrophe in plural words, as plural word's

Decimate instead of devastate. (Decimate means to reduce by one tenth)

"irregardless" instead of regardless.

For those who don't think "clip" in place of "magazine" is a big deal, would it be if you got stripper clips for an M-14 or M-16 when you thought you were buying magazines?

Any statement that starts with "Basically"

Anyone who answers a question by posing his own question or questions and then answers it. Example:

Question: "Did you screw up coaching this game?"

Reply: "Do you mean do I think I could have done a better job? Of course. Am I happy with its outcome? No." Do we have to do better as a team and a coaching staff? Yes. Did I evade the question and substitute a whole bunch of meaningless drivel and platitudes for a simple yes or no answer? Yes."

bowfin
February 14, 2006, 04:25 PM
Oh, and I had my dog "spaded".

Darkness
February 14, 2006, 04:30 PM
I can't help it. I must add to this thread. It calls to me.

My peeve is redundancy. When someone begins a sentence with 'Right now at this point in time', it makes me cringe.

"Right now, at this point in time, as I sit here reading, perusing this thread, I am sure, without doubt, that there are other individuals, people like myself, who are critically examining these words, studying them, learned people, educated, trying to discover and detect any mistakes and errors I might have myself posted, possibly resulting in poor grammar, language errors, and or possibly grammatical mistakes, waiting to ambush and pounce on me, my person, for each infraction and incident discovered."

I am sure you get the idea.

Nematocyst
February 14, 2006, 04:34 PM
I don't like "Shottie" for a shotgun. Do they call their pistols "pissies"? HAHAHAHHAHAHAA....Oh, another great belly laugh.:D :D :D

Dang, you guys are killing me here.... <wipes tears of laughter>

Missouri Mule
February 14, 2006, 05:14 PM
American Slang isn't easily acepted by the amorphic culterally superior ....:barf:


Basically, if a person understands what another person is saying *** does memorizing The American Heritage Dictionary and The Thesaurus prove.....



What does "tranny" mean to you?
Where I come from it's a vital part of my automobiles drive train.

1911Tuner
February 14, 2006, 05:29 PM
American Slang isn't easily acepted by the amorphic culterally superior ....:barf:


Basically, if a person understands what another person is saying *** does memorizing The American Heritage Dictionary and The Thesaurus prove.....
What does "tranny" mean to you?
Where I come from it's a vital part of my automobiles drive train.

My God! A perfectly logical response...at last!

Missouri Mule...Thank you sir. WHOOPS! I clean fergot to put a comma between you and sir. Go ahead and gimme 20 lashes with a wet noodle
so that I shall never forget!

:rolleyes:

Carl N. Brown
February 14, 2006, 05:44 PM
Sometimes I type faster than I think and drop punctuation,
vowels, and a few times (after reading a response to a post)
find I have dropped a whole sentence or thought.

For that reasom I do tolerate the shorthand I read from others.

But it would be best if we did bother to use "then" and "than"
and other parts of the language correctly.

Civilization advances when each generation can pass on knowledge and
experience. There is suposed to be a tribe in South America that
never progressed past the stone age because their language
changed too radically from generation to generation.

KriegHund
February 14, 2006, 05:45 PM
American Slang isn't easily acepted by the amorphic culterally superior ....:barf:


Basically, if a person understands what another person is saying *** does memorizing The American Heritage Dictionary and The Thesaurus prove.....



What does "tranny" mean to you?
Where I come from it's a vital part of my automobiles drive train.

Much agreed.

Sure, i like to talk fancy sometimes. I talk depending on my mood really.
I consider language a flexible and versatile tool for conveying emotions ans feelings; as such, it isnt uncommon to find people talking like they feel, lazy, relaxed, tense, etc, its all shown.

Its like how you talk. Ive heard people saying- yes, speaking aloud- internet speak (LOL, ROFL, LMAO etc)

You know whats worse?

Occasionaly if i am thinking and think of something funny i will think "Lol". A travesty, im sure. I find it amusing...lol.:D

Yeesh, im reading some of these posts, some of you are really rectally-retentive...

bowfin
February 14, 2006, 05:48 PM
/*Basically, if a person understands what another person is saying *** does memorizing The American Heritage Dictionary and The Thesaurus prove.....
What does "tranny" mean to you?
Where I come from it's a vital part of my automobiles drive train.*/

Well, if we all memorized the American Heritage Dictionary, we would have a common language, and people from Missouri would more easily converse with everyone in the entire 50 states. It is ironic that you follow up with "tranny" as an example, because it will prove my point.

Go to San Francisco and ask a guy on the street corner where you can get a "tranny" for cheap. He probably won't bring you a Turbohydromatic 350, but instead will bring you a six foot platinum blonde with big boobs, nice legs, a five o'clock shadow and an Adam's apple. You will then know why the American Heritage Dictionary has both "transmission" and "transvestite" in its hallowed pages.

Need another example? Have someone from West Virginia go up to Minnesota and ask for a "poke" and see if he gets a sack (or a bag) or stuck in the eye with a finger. Is it worth a fistfight to use slang?:p

KriegHund
February 14, 2006, 05:57 PM
Wait, i am bothered (rectal-retentive) by one thing!!! Though its not worth arguing with people over, since my mom does it too.

Stoled. Sounds like something a moronic 2 year old would say.

Its STOLE. There is no D. The bad part is they think its a real word. It t'aint (he he) in the dictionary, or at least merriam webster.

Mommy, i stoled the apple, im sorry :fire:

Im a bit hippocritical.

MechAg94
February 14, 2006, 06:37 PM
as far as our living language is concerned, as a technologist, it's my opinion that English as it was WRITTEN 20 to 100 years ago just can't cut it anymore. It's too slow for today's media. It also lacks the ability to convey emotion and connotations we express with our body language and spoken inflections.

I would vehemently disagree with this statement. If people would learn proper vocabulary, the English language of 100 years ago would work just fine. IMHO, part of the problem is snobs who know vocabulary tend arrogantly show it off. This gives good vocabulary a bad image. I have seen it on this site before.

Personally, I think the complete lack of proper punctuation is my biggest complaint. Use of quotes to "highlight" word or excessive use of ALL CAPS are a close second.

Herself
February 14, 2006, 07:29 PM
as far as our living language is concerned, as a technologist, it's my opinion that English as it was WRITTEN 20 to 100 years ago just can't cut it anymore. It's too slow for today's media. It also lacks the ability to convey emotion and connotations we express with our body language and spoken inflections.
I would vehemently disagree with this statement. If people would learn proper vocabulary, the English language of 100 years ago would work just fine..
Funny thing is, you're both right.

Try Googling Phillips Code -- http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=phillips+code&btnG=Search -- which was a 19th Century form of data compression to conserve bandwidth (actually to save time but we all know you trade one for the other!) used by telegraphers, the original online geeks. Some of it survives today. (e.g., "potus- President of the US.")
They also used a huge amount of shorthand slang, parts of which carried over to radiotelegraphy and are still used by radio amateurs. "HI" (didididit didit) is the ancestor of "LOL."

73,
--Herself

Tory
February 14, 2006, 08:18 PM
"American Slang isn't easily acepted by the amorphic culterally superior."

Slang is. Lectures about social evolution from those who cannot even spell "culturally" correctly are not. :scrutiny:

shell70634
February 14, 2006, 09:31 PM
Explosive Ordinance Disposal: is this disposal of explosive regulations?

Pet peeve for many many years

meef
February 14, 2006, 10:17 PM
Occasionaly if i am thinking and think of something funny i will think "Lol". A travesty, im sure. I find it amusing...lol.:D
And I have seen people use that very "lol" and decide to get carried away with it to really let you know how wonderfully amused they are - and consequently type "LOLOLOLOLOLOL"!

Ye gods, it looks like they're freaking yodeling!

:barf:

Kar-el
February 14, 2006, 10:18 PM
"Houge" grips. Argh!



Karl Hogue

unixguy
February 15, 2006, 12:54 AM
We agree there, also. Please help me understand, though, a use of the word "then" that doesn't depend upon "if" (at least implicitly). If you can offer such an example, then I will be enlightened. :D

I shall write this example, and then you will read it and correct it if necessary.

I ate 12 donuts all by myself, and then I threw up.

We were in the middle of a long drought, so I washed my car and then it rained.
</end of examples>

Although I suspect that "then" in each of these sentences is not the best choice of words, I think it's only a really bad choice in the last sentence.

Nematocyst
February 15, 2006, 01:13 AM
I shall write this example, and then you will read it and correct it if necessary. Excellent!

Leave it to another Oregonian to illustrate it so nicely. ;)

Nem

Missouri Mule
February 15, 2006, 11:27 AM
/*Basically, if a person understands what another person is saying *** does memorizing The American Heritage Dictionary and The Thesaurus prove.....
What does "tranny" mean to you?
Where I come from it's a vital part of my automobiles drive train.*/

Well, if we all memorized the American Heritage Dictionary, we would have a common language, and people from Missouri would more easily converse with everyone in the entire 50 states. It is ironic that you follow up with "tranny" as an example, because it will prove my point.

Go to San Francisco and ask a guy on the street corner where you can get a "tranny" for cheap. He probably won't bring you a Turbohydromatic 350, but instead will bring you a six foot platinum blonde with big boobs, nice legs, a five o'clock shadow and an Adam's apple. You will then know why the American Heritage Dictionary has both "transmission" and "transvestite" in its hallowed pages.

Need another example? Have someone from West Virginia go up to Minnesota and ask for a "poke" and see if he gets a sack (or a bag) or stuck in the eye with a finger. Is it worth a fistfight to use slang?:p


What's so ironic to you about the tranny reference? I'm not sure, but you seem to have gotten the point.
You didn't prove anything except for my point that American Culture is vastly diverse.

In todays society it is more important than ever to understand "American Slang" Not doing so in the right circumstances can get you hurt or worse. You see, I can agree with you.

I will say that there is a time and place for proper english and 99% of the time it is in a classroom.


It must be terribly lonely way up there......

C'mon Dawg...chill! It's all good!

Manedwolf
February 15, 2006, 12:10 PM
Stoled. Sounds like something a moronic 2 year old would say.



That seems to be regional slang among people from some cities in Noo Joisey. Same sorts who also use "dese", "dem" and "dose" for these, them and those.

Manedwolf
February 15, 2006, 12:14 PM
Explosive Ordinance Disposal: is this disposal of explosive regulations?

Pet peeve for many many years

Yeah. There are ordinances about ordnance, and ordnance can be used to enforce ordinances. :D

BigG
February 15, 2006, 01:28 PM
I write a lot of short articles and "spell for effect" sometimes, like Mark Twain, or Charles Dickens. Besides, Andrew Jackson reportedly said "It's a damn poor mind that can only think of one way to spell a word." ;)

BigG
February 15, 2006, 01:33 PM
Not strictly gun related, but, another pet peeve.

Reading the eight hundredth guy who posts something like "You know, liberal actually means a guy who is well educated and quite conservative by today's standards." ^wink^ as if none of us had ever learned that before.

That I find accurate, but at the same time useless and moronic. :banghead:

Missouri Mule
February 15, 2006, 01:42 PM
I write a lot of short articles and "spell for effect" sometimes, like Mark Twain, or Charles Dickens. Besides, Andrew Jackson reportedly said "It's a damn poor mind that can only think of one way to spell a word." ;)


That freind.... is PRICELESS!

Thank you!

ambush
February 15, 2006, 01:43 PM
That seems to be regional slang among people from some cities in Noo Joisey. Same sorts who also use "dese", "dem" and "dose" for these, them and those.

Yo.....youse is gett'en personal up in dis bee-atch now.:neener:

ball3006
February 15, 2006, 01:47 PM
for all the new words I learned today. I figger, I was put on dis tere earth to butcher the english language.........When I do this, it drives my dad up the wall. The next visit is going to be good...........chris3

bowfin
February 16, 2006, 05:32 PM
/*It must be terribly lonely way up there...... */

Moreso every day, I am afraid. Why not come up here and join me? No need to sink to the least common denominator and get 90% of your ideas across to 90% of the people using slang, when proper schoolroom English can do so much better for a person. Speaking and writing proper English is much like shooting, it becomes more enjoyable and more effective as one becomes more proficient at it.

With you being from Missouri, and I being from Nebraska, we probably would have few problems conversing. However, I certainly have problems with "ebonics" from the L.A. ghettos, people from "New Joysey", and other places where the inhabitants choose to pursue some sort of perverse distinction by using slang and accents, in place of pursuing commonality and clarity of language.

Now consider the United Kingdom, hosting among other lingual atrocities, the Scottish burr and the Cockney slang. These two locales have taken your philosophy to such an extreme point that they cannot even converse with each other (or us) with a supposedly common language.

1911Tuner
February 16, 2006, 05:48 PM
Okay. I've got one, just to show that I can get worked up over incorrect terminology.

Newscaster reporting on action in Iraq:

"The entire building was >decimated<...:rolleyes:

To be decimated means to be reduced by exactly ten percent. No more and no less. If 99 out of a hundred soldiers are killed...or 11 or 25 out of a hundred are killed...that hundred-man group has not been decimated.

Carry on!:cool:

SixForSure
February 16, 2006, 06:02 PM
http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?va=decimate

KriegHund
February 16, 2006, 06:08 PM
An interesting history behind that word.

texasguy
February 16, 2006, 06:17 PM
I hate it when people say "schnyper" instead of "sniper". :rolleyes:

I hate it when I go to the range or a gun show and I take out my suped up 10/22, and a kid, sometimes adults, will say, "Wow. That's a nice sniper." I get confused, because I have anticipated his lack of gun intelligence and I want to explain to them the whole concept of being a "sniper", which is more a mindset anyway.

I tell them, "A sniper is a man who uses a weapon to kill humans with from long a distance. Second, My gun is a semi-automatic rifle with a 6.5-20x44mm scope. It is not a sniper."

Nematocyst
February 16, 2006, 06:20 PM
Speaking and writing proper English is much like shooting, it becomes more enjoyable and more effective as one becomes more proficient at it.

Bowfin, well said.

I agree. (AKA +1).

Nem, in an extremely busy week, but reading along as I can...

1911Tuner
February 16, 2006, 06:55 PM
An interesting history behind that word.

Yep...From the Holy Roman Empire.

And I go with the first definition of the word...closer to the correct/original intent.;)

Mal H
February 16, 2006, 07:34 PM
"From the Holy Roman Empire."

Well, maybe not "holy", but Roman for sure. :)

Decimate is derived from Latin. The Holy Roman Empire is more akin to present day Europe, the Germanic portion.

1911Tuner
February 17, 2006, 07:02 AM
Okay. The Un-holy Roman Empire then...:D

I've got another one! (This is actually kinda fun.)

"The victim died in a hail of bullets."

:scrutiny:

Uh...Last time I checked, hail falls more or less straight down, while bullets travel horizontally...if we discount plunging fire.

Gordon Fink
February 17, 2006, 10:59 AM
Someone (Voltaire?) once said that the only problem with the Holy Roman Empire was that it wasnt holy, Roman, or an empire.

~G. Fink

Nathanael_Greene
February 17, 2006, 01:51 PM
Before this thread gets closed for wandering too far off topic, I'd just like to state that despite whatever problems exist on THR, it is by far the most literate of the firearm-related forums that I've found.

Pork Fat
February 17, 2006, 02:34 PM
This is a late response to the gent that was peeved by "grips" being used
instead of his preferred "stocks" when referring to the slabs of material that
are fastened to the handle portion of the frame of a handgun. It seems to me
that this is a fairly recent debate.
I have devoured various and sundry gun rags for a good twenty-five years,
and it seems that most writers called them "grips", as did manufacturers-
(Eagle Grips, Pachmayr, etc.). I can't remember which writer I first noticed
using "stocks", but I recall thinking that it was a bit jarring.
"Grips" or "grip" can in fact be nouns- I believe that is what the rubber
thingies that golfers replace on their clubs are called.It makes a certain sense to me that the principal form of support for the receiver,barrel and such on a long gun is called the stock, dating back to pre-matchlock days.
Now most handguns have a frame that does the heavy lifting, with the useful and often aesthetically pleasing grip or grips attached.
I would allow that a fine Anschutz or other pistol based on a rifle would have a stock, as would most traditional muzzleloading pistols.
I suppose there is logic to both sides, but I find this newish "proper" term
so odd that I actually registered after a year of lurking and enjoying zombie
and SHTF threads. Hope I didn't make anyone mad.
(I suck at typing- this thread may be ancient history by now)

Gordon Fink
February 17, 2006, 03:37 PM
According to the Oxford English Dictionary the use of the word stock goes back to the 15th century A.D. It seems to have been first used to describe the wooden carriage of a cannon and was perhaps only later applied to small arms. Based on this information, I would say that stock probably should not apply solely to the gripped portion of a firearm and almost certainly not to the pistol grip of a modern metal-framed handgun.

~G. Fink

iapetus
February 17, 2006, 03:37 PM
Is it correct to say that a rifle's caliber is ".223 Remington" or "30-06", etc?

Or should caliber just be used to refer to the actual bullet/bore diameter, and not the cartridge it uses?

Creeping Incrementalism
February 17, 2006, 05:27 PM
Is it correct to say that a rifle's caliber is ".223 Remington" or "30-06", etc?

Or should caliber just be used to refer to the actual bullet/bore diameter, and not the cartridge it uses?

I believe caliber refers only to bore diameter, beginning one decimal place to the right, in inches. So 50 caliber, not .50 caliber, would be a gun with a bore of .50 inches. Even though I think the typical fifty caliber acually has a bore diameter of .510 inches.

And calibers is how many times longer the barrel is than the bore. So a 50 caliber rifle of 50 calibers would have a barrel 25 inches long.

Creeping Incrementalism
February 17, 2006, 05:31 PM
Now consider the United Kingdom, hosting among other lingual atrocities, the Scottish burr and the Cockney slang. These two locales have taken your philosophy to such an extreme point that they cannot even converse with each other (or us) with a supposedly common language.

I always crack up when English/Irish/Scottish natives need subtitles to be understood in America.

Missouri Mule
February 17, 2006, 06:49 PM
/*It must be terribly lonely way up there...... */

Moreso every day, I am afraid. Why not come up here and join me? No need to sink to the least common denominator and get 90% of your ideas across to 90% of the people using slang, when proper schoolroom English can do so much better for a person. Speaking and writing proper English is much like shooting, it becomes more enjoyable and more effective as one becomes more proficient at it.

With you being from Missouri, and I being from Nebraska, we probably would have few problems conversing. However, I certainly have problems with "ebonics" from the L.A. ghettos, people from "New Joysey", and other places where the inhabitants choose to pursue some sort of perverse distinction by using slang and accents, in place of pursuing commonality and clarity of language.

Now consider the United Kingdom, hosting among other lingual atrocities, the Scottish burr and the Cockney slang. These two locales have taken your philosophy to such an extreme point that they cannot even converse with each other (or us) with a supposedly common language.

OK dude..It's all good!

I am a little curious though, what is your profession and educational background?

Verbal communication is a two way street..

straightShot
February 17, 2006, 08:59 PM
The most offensive, at least to me, follow:

"My two gun's are Sig's. They're each in different caliber's. I usually take them out on Sunday's and go shooting with my buddy's."

I don't know why folks have started to add an apostrophe in order to make words plural. Adding an 's' or dropping the 'y' to add 'ies' usually suffices, unless an acronym is being made plural. I seem to see this more and more on gun forum's.

Tory
February 18, 2006, 09:45 AM
"I don't know why folks have started to add an apostrophe in order to make words plural. .... I seem to see this more and more on gun forum's."


Ignorance is contagious and the internet greatly accelerates the spread of stupidity by making it seem acceptable. :barf:

PinnedAndRecessed
February 18, 2006, 12:31 PM
Oh, where to begin.

1) How about children/teens posting on this, and other forums? Threads like, "If the bogeyman attacks, which would be better? A shotty or a big gun like Duke Nukem uses?"

2) Idiotic terms like, "shotty."

3) People who brag about their idiotic exploits with the public. One guy sees some rude teenagers and he's preparing to draw his super, duper, uber cusomized weapon (which he carries in his James Bond spy holster) and blast everyone, including himself, to smithereens.

One guy was in Northern Kal and jumped into a fray between two thugs with his two (not one, mind you, but two) custom made knives. Made himself look foolish. Obviously been watching too many movies.

4) People who do business over the internet but if the retailer is late, etc., immediately goes on the internet to slander/slam said retailer. "The supplier shipped me my complete Hopalong Cassidy quick draw gear but forgot the plastic thingy that holds my badge in place. I demanded a free Flip Wilson hat but they refused. Everybody who wants to be my friend, don't like this supplier."

Two words of advice for the above: a) Grow up and b) call a whaaambulance. Ok, it's more like six words, but you get the point.

:barf: :neener: :evil: :cuss:

Gun Geezer
February 18, 2006, 06:36 PM
The weather dude refers to storms as having "dangerous lightening".

Is there any other kind?;)

But my all time pet peeve favorite is someone expressing themselves with "I could care less". Get is right! It should be "I couldn't care less"! That one just eats me up.

Makes me want to put a clip full of bullets in my boom stick...

pax
February 18, 2006, 07:15 PM
The weather dude refers to storms as having "dangerous lightening".
That would be the kind a suicide blonde gets -- dyed by her own hand.
Is there any other kind?
Yeah, the kind spelled without an "e," that flashes in the sky.

;)

(Just playing with you. Never ceases to amaze me how many typos sneak into threads griping about spelling & grammar.)

pax

hrb02
February 18, 2006, 07:43 PM
Irregardless of the opinion's in dis forum, I will continue read it, so's I don't loose my edge when I take my shotty, gats and boomsticks to the range to put some clips through them :neener:

Johnny Guest
February 18, 2006, 09:39 PM
tommygunm1a1 - -
In post #164, you wrote, The ones that get me to cringe the most are: . . . and semi automatic pistol instead of just pistol (vs. a revolver) Sir, not to nit pick (amid an entire thread of us pickin' our own personal nits? ;)) but semi-automatic pistol is entirely correct, if usually a bit redundant.

In current usage, a pistol is any handgun which is not a revolver. There are a quite a few non-semiauto pistols. The Thompson Contender is a single shot pistol, and the Remington double derringer is a two shot pistol, and the little Sharps pepperbox, the Mossberg Brownie, and the wretched C.O.P. are all four-barrelled pistols. Many years ago, I read that a pistol has the chamber as part of the barrel, i.e., not a series of chambers in a cylinder, which would be, perforce, a revolver. Like so many young smart alecs, I made free to correct my elders on this meaningless point. Finally some ol' guy opened up a fine wooden handgun case and pointed out the label inside the lid proclaiming the content as "Col Colt's Navy Model Revolving Belt Pistol." I suffered an acute attack of humility at that point. I mean, Sam Colt invented the blamed thing, right?

Best,
Johnny

Archie
February 19, 2006, 12:09 AM
In addition to the several items mentioned, one of my pet peeves in language usage is same difference, meaning two items are identical, have identical functions or will provide identical results. Makes me want to throw a hangernade.

Another questionable usage is the identification of certain firearms by a user; for instance, one of those Rambo guns (which I think was an M60 machinegun, I never saw the movie). Or a real Quigley rifle not to be confused with an ersatz Quigley rifle. And of course, the never to be forgotten Dirty Harry Gun Shaft, Superfly and others have also created character guns which seem to have a life of their own. Various war movies have made certain firearms popular. Happily I usually hear people talking about M1 Garands, or sometimes Grands, which they are, but not by name. Only in the under ten-year-old set do I hear anyone speak of Army rifle.

I urge all to expand their command of the language. English is the most expressive language on Earth. One can say things and make differentiations in English not possible in many other languages. This is not to be taken as looking down upon or feeling superior to anyone; rather I find it easier to understand when one uses proper terms and spellings.

For instance, Put these thingamabobs in this thingie here; make sure they is pointy-end frontwards. Then the whole doodad goes in this place. Give that gizmo a hard yank and your sit. Could you properly load a magazine and charge a firearm from that verbal only description? Yes, I am exaggerating, but I hope everyone understands.

Again on the defense of not paying to certain word misspellings and typographical errors. Would anyone be happy with a crudely shaped and finished wooden stocked rifle? After all, it still shoots and that is the important function, is it not? So why criticize the gunsmith or manufacturer when the stock doesnt fit right or the finish is shabby? Because the lack of attention to detail is disturbing.

Everyone misspells a word at times. I have a set of words I cannot spell the first try. However, I normally type up my posts on the word processor function of my computer. It checks spelling automatically, which saves me from some of the common errors. What the program will not do is to ensure I use the proper word, their/there/theyre and so on.

I suppose the reality is this: I dont mind being stupid; Im accustomed to that. But I hate looking stupid.

cosine
February 19, 2006, 12:22 AM
Someone (Voltaire?) once said that the only problem with the Holy Roman Empire was that it wasn’t holy, Roman, or an empire.

~G. Fink
Sounds like a case of sour grapes to me. ;)

Okay, enough of the thread hijack.

I don't really have any pet peeves regarding English, grammar, or inaccurate gun references or terminology. As long as I can understand what the poster is trying to say I'm pretty tolerant of other shortcomings in the post.
However, I do wish to praise this thread. It's been good for a bit of entertainment on an otherwise boring Saturday night. :D

bowfin
February 20, 2006, 05:53 PM
Missouri Mule,

My formal education doesn't go beyond a half dozen or so classes at the Community College.

I have been a blue collar worker in heavy manufacturing for most of my life. I even worked in a "tranny" shop for a year or so. It was not uncommon to see otherwise brilliant people grinding to a complete halt because shifts or departments being unable to communicate to each other because someone couldn't spell, write legibly, or use correct grammar well enough. Half the toolroom on double time huddled together trying to decipher a note found on a machine part telling us what it was for and what to do with it.

Right now I do software, electronics and computers. C programming language will spit out 2,100 errors in a proof for a single missed comma or semi-colon. That might be part of my devotion (or obsession) to details and accuracy.

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