Weird trivial pursuit question. Can anyone verify?


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jsalcedo
March 20, 2005, 10:50 AM
I was playing the 90's edition of trivial pursuit last night when the question came up:

What city, home to the original Colt firearms factory has manhole covers that read "made from 292 confiscated melted down guns?


Has anyone in Hartford seen these or have a picture?

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WT
March 20, 2005, 11:09 AM
The original Colt factory was in Paterson, NJ. They certainly don't have manholes with that inscription.

jsalcedo
March 20, 2005, 11:26 AM
The original Colt factory was in Paterson, NJ. They certainly don't have manholes with that inscription.

Thats what I was thinking. The answer was Hartford in the game.


I guess we need to hear from Hartford residents.

Keaner
March 20, 2005, 12:20 PM
FWIW: I found this site that shows pictures of a bunch of manhole covers from CT, none of them (all of the hartford listed ones) show this inscription: http://users.rcn.com/fgardino/Connecticut.htm

In my experience, Trivial Persuit is a game with horribly inaccurate questions, and I never trust anything that comes from that game.

As for the manhole covers: i call shenanigans .

Mulliga
March 20, 2005, 04:01 PM
Wow...anti-gun propaganda in board games. It's tinfoil time! :uhoh:

Andrew Rothman
March 20, 2005, 04:51 PM
Oh, I think it happened.

Some gun grabber artist thing.

http://www.marvelligallery.com/McCalBio.html

1996

Condon, Tom, Guns-to-Covers A Great Idea, The Hartford Courant,
(September 1, 1996), Sec. B page 1
Hanley, Christine, Guns to Manhole Covers, Associated Press, (October
18, 1996), front page w/ photo
Keedle, Jane, A Legacy of Violence, The Hartford Advocate, (October
17, 1996), Page 17
Rondeau, James, The Manhole Cover Project: A Gun Legacy, Catalogue Essay,
Wadsworth Atheneum, (Oct., 1996)

Harry Tuttle
March 20, 2005, 04:55 PM
1996-97
The Manhole Cover Project: A Gun Legacy, Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford CT


http://www.marvelligallery.com/McCalBio.html

http://www.americansforthearts.org/animatingdemocracy/resource_center/profiles_content.asp?id=216

The Manhole Cover Project: A Gun Legacy
Wadsworth Atheneum



Project Description: The Manhole Cover Project (1997) was organized to provide a contemporary counterpoint to Sam and Elizabeth: Legend and Legacy of Colt's Empire, an exhibition of artworks collected by Hartford gun manufacturer Samuel Colt. The Manhole Cover Project by artist Bradley McCallum was a collaborative public art project that responded to Hartford's past and also attempted to gain perspective on the current problem of gun violence in the city. McCallum did not pretend the project offered solutions to gun violence. Rather, its goal was to engage diverse audiences in the process of translating a pressing social problem into a meaningful set of cultural metaphors. With gun violence increasingly addressed as a public health issue and not simply a criminal justice issue, the Atheneum collaborated with Connecticut Childhood Injury Prevention Center of Connecticut Children's Medical Center to maximize the project's potential for education and prevention.

At the Wadsworth Atheneum, the project was represented by the exhibition of 228 custom-designed manhole covers weighing 32,216 pounds, the exact equivalent to the weight of the 11,194 guns confiscated by Connecticut State Police since 1992. McCallum modified the design for the city's existing manhole cover pattern in two important ways. Each cover was emblazoned with the words "MADE FROM 172 LBS OF YOUR CONFISCATED GUNS." McCallum intended the purposely vague pronoun "your" to suggest a sense of collective responsibility through the metaphor of collective ownership. Each cover also bears the Latin phrase Vincit Qui Patitur, the Colt family motto, alternately understood to mean "He Who Perseveres is Victorious" or "He Who Suffers Conquers." McCallum was drawn to the ambiguous meaning of the motto and how these once-romanticized notions of strength and suffering have changed over time. The manhole covers were displayed in a temporary outdoor installation at the museum before they were installed in the streets of Hartford, many destined for some of the most crime-ridden neighborhoods. The museum installation also included audio testimonies, collected by five Hartford students, from individuals whose lives had been affected by gun violence.

Civic Engagement/Dialogue: For four months, McCallum, under the supervision of the Connecticut Childhood Injury Prevention Center, led a team of local students identified by CCIPC in collecting oral stories from family members of victims of gun-related death; youth who had witnessed an act of gun violence or themselves had been shot; perpetrators of gun violence; and public health officials who deal with gun-related injury. Students went through intensive orientation and training with the artist and social service professionals before conducting interviews. At the end of the four months, students had spoken with more than seventy-five individuals and recorded twenty complete interviews.

Information Sources: Rondeau, James. The Manhole Cover Project: A Gun Legacy. (exhibition catalogue), Wadsworth Atheneum, 1996. Eiseman, Alberta. "Sam, Elizabeth and the Victims of Guns." The New York Times, Jan. 12, 1997.


Hartford, CT, Primary Artist(s):
Brad McCallum

jsalcedo
March 20, 2005, 05:18 PM
Thanks Harry, I was very curious to what that was all about.

Now having read that, I need to go :barf:

Harry Tuttle
March 20, 2005, 07:52 PM
Bradley McCallum

Bradley McCallum received his BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1989 and his MFA in Sculpture from the Yale School of Art in 1992. During the past decade he has created site-specific community based artworks built from a collaborative process of gathering oral histories and testimonies that are then utilizes as the primary material for his sculptural installations. His past works include an installation at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford CT titled, The Manhole Cover Project: a Gun Legacy, a work that juxtaposed utility covers made from confiscated fire arms with the audio recordings of those who have been impacted by gun violence. His work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions nationally. Witness: Perspectives on Police Violence a work in collaboration with Jacqueline Tarry, is McCallum's first public project in New York City.

even when they make "art", they lie

280PLUS
March 20, 2005, 08:39 PM
During the Colt exhibition at the Wadsworth they were piled up outside where you had to walk by to get into the museum complete with a sign describing them. They were exactly that, a counterpoint allowed to the antis by the Colt exhibition. Did they actually end up serving the city of Hartford? I don't know. I'll keep my eyes peeled and see if there's any around. I'll be in Hartford tomorrow as a matter of fact.

Inside the exibition there was a "graffitti" wall where you could post your feelings on guns and gun control. Another counterpoint allowed to the antis. My post? "I'll keep that shotgun by my bed. Thank you."

;)

280PLUS
March 25, 2005, 02:13 PM
I finally made it into Hartford and into one of the uh, less nicer parts of town and couldn't seem to find a manhole cover anywhere that said anything about being made out of guns. Most of them said "Sewer", believe it or not. What a concept.

But I haven't given up. I'll keep looking...

I should call Public Works and ask them whatever became of these.

;)

Public works is closed today but the Hartford Police know nothing about any manhole covers. I should begin to hear black helicopters any minute now,,,

donning tin foil hat...

:eek:

:rolleyes:

jsalcedo
March 25, 2005, 02:22 PM
280PLUS

While you are at it, I wouldn't mind having one in my gun room. :evil:

280PLUS
March 25, 2005, 02:27 PM
I'd just like to get a pic of one actually being used. I just tried Public works and theyre closed. Then I tried the Hartford Police and they ain't never heard of no manhole covers.

"You're saying we made manhole covers out of our confiscated guns?"

Me, "Yes."

"No, we never did that."

:rolleyes:

Harry Tuttle
March 25, 2005, 05:52 PM
the "artist" never made them out of guns either.

At the Wadsworth Atheneum, the project was represented by the exhibition of 228 custom-designed manhole covers weighing 32,216 pounds, the exact equivalent to the weight of the 11,194 guns confiscated by Connecticut State Police since 1992.

McCallum modified the design for the city's existing manhole cover pattern in two important ways. Each cover was emblazoned with the words "MADE FROM 172 LBS OF YOUR CONFISCATED GUNS." McCallum intended the purposely vague pronoun "your" to suggest a sense of collective responsibility through the metaphor of collective ownership.

the "sculptures" were prolly donated to a museum for a tax right off.

2.87 x 11,194= 32,216

jsalcedo
March 25, 2005, 05:59 PM
The manhole covers were displayed in a temporary outdoor installation at the museum before they were installed in the streets of Hartford, many destined for some of the most crime-ridden neighborhoods.

Maybe the manhole covers were stolen and made into guns :evil:

280PLUS
March 25, 2005, 06:02 PM
Oh fer cryin' out loud!

:banghead:

:D

I've got an email in to the Wadsworth, let's see if I get one back.

It'll probably be a few days...

Standing Wolf
March 25, 2005, 08:43 PM
McCallum did not pretend the project offered solutions to gun violence. Rather, its goal was to engage diverse audiences in the process of translating a pressing social problem into a meaningful set of cultural metaphors.

Witless gibberish, in short.

280PLUS
March 25, 2005, 10:04 PM
They should say, " The EQUIVALENT of 172 pounds of your confiscated guns."

Leave it to the antis to "forget" a critical fact.

I felt I was misled as I surely thought this really was melted down guns. I doubt I was the only one to think this. Of course the more that I thought about it, WHERE and WHY would Hartford hang onto 32,000 plus pounds of guns for whastever length of time?

I get the feeling our "artist" was more like trying to give us an idea of what 32,000 plus pounds of guns might look like? It sure was a big ol' pile of manhole covers...

But where did it go?

:confused:

mfree
March 25, 2005, 10:33 PM
I heard there was one like that round made of melted down lorcin, bryco, jennings, and davis firearms, but it gave way under the weight of traffic...

Hawkmoon
March 25, 2005, 10:43 PM
Colt's original factory was in Patterson, but it wasn't called Colt Patent Firearms Company then. That was the name when he started up again in Hartford.

280PLUS
March 29, 2005, 05:02 PM
The wadsworth has replied and must do some research. We may find one of these yet. They seem to be indicating that they were installed though. I'll get back to you...

280PLUS
August 5, 2005, 04:13 PM
----- Original Message -----
From: "Intern Curatorial" <Intern.Curatorial@wadsworthatheneum.org>
To: <XXXXXX
Sent: Friday, August 05, 2005 9:34 AM
Subject: manhole cover project


Dear Mr. XXXX
My name is Stephen Persing and I'm a volunteer at the Wadsworth Atheneum. I'm writing in regards to your question of March 25, 2005, concerning the Manhole Cover Project.
First, our apologies for having taken so long in answering your question.
One hundred custom-designed manhole covers, designed by artist Brad McCallum, were shown here, and turned over to the Metropolitan District Commission, which is in charge of manholes. We do not have any of the manhole covers in our collection. An email to the MDC produced the following reply:

"The recollection around here is that there are some covers around schools, particularly in the Franklin Avenue area. There are also some covers in storage at our Maxim Road facility. Please call Harvey Wall, Assistant Manager of Operations, at 860-278-7850, ext. 3610, for additional information."

While this answer is rather vague, it does at least let us know that some of them still exist. There is also information on the Manhole Cover Project at http://www.conjunctionarts.org , a group Brad McCallum works with. I hope this information has been helpful to you. Please write to us if you have any further questions, and we'll try to get an answer to you in a reasonable amount of time.

Stephen Persing
Curatorial Volunteer
intern.curatorial@wadsworthatheneum.org
(860) 278-2670 ex. 3113

Father Knows Best
August 5, 2005, 04:34 PM
the project was represented by the exhibition of 228 custom-designed manhole covers weighing 32,216 pounds, the exact equivalent to the weight of the 11,194 guns confiscated by Connecticut State Police since 1992. McCallum modified the design for the city's existing manhole cover pattern in two important ways. Each cover was emblazoned with the words "MADE FROM 172 LBS OF YOUR CONFISCATED GUNS."

What am I missing here? If 228 covers weigh a total of 32,216 pounds, then each cover weighs 141.3 pounds (32,216 / 228 = 141.3). How then could each cover be made from 172 pounds of confiscated guns (or "the equivalent" thereof)? What happened to the other 30.7 pounds?

K-Romulus
August 5, 2005, 04:36 PM
my bet was that they were sold to China, and destined for the NORINCO factories . . . :evil:

Kruzr
August 5, 2005, 05:56 PM
http://www.s-t.com/daily/10-96/10-18-96/manhole.jpg
The blurp about the 172 lbs of confiscated guns is on the inner circle.

280PLUS
August 5, 2005, 06:59 PM
Kruzr - Where'd you get the pic? That LOOKS like the display when it was outside the Atheneum.

What am I missing here?

heck, the fuzzy math is nothing catch THIS:

the exact equivalent to the weight of the 11,194 guns

They were presented as being made out of melted down guns when in fact they just "represented" the weight of said guns. No melted guns were used... :rolleyes:

Gordon Fink
August 5, 2005, 07:16 PM
No firearms were harmed in the making of this exhibit

~G. Fink ;)

Silver Bullet
August 5, 2005, 07:16 PM
Maybe the manhole covers were stolen and made into guns

:D

280PLUS
August 5, 2005, 07:54 PM
Maybe the manhole covers were stolen and made into guns?

LOL,,,Now THAT would be justice!

:D

280PLUS
August 5, 2005, 09:20 PM
Found this one...

Tell me this doesn't imply it's made of melted down guns!

Lying :cuss:
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=27386

Silver Bullet
August 5, 2005, 09:31 PM
That's a lot of confiscated guns, mein herr.

Between the confiscations and the gun buy-backs, they're helping keep the gun industry alive. You gotta figure that a lot of those folks who had their guns confiscated or who sold their guns to the city eventually got around to remembering why they needed a gun in the first place, so they went out and bought another one.

And here I thought the cities were being anti-gun.

atek3
August 6, 2005, 01:16 AM
Quote:
McCallum did not pretend the project offered solutions to gun violence. Rather, its goal was to engage diverse audiences in the process of translating a pressing social problem into a meaningful set of cultural metaphors.



Witless gibberish, in short.


True Dat!

artherd
August 6, 2005, 01:30 AM
Someone find me one of those, so I can put a .50BMG black tip through it.

No_Brakes23
August 6, 2005, 03:07 AM
The original edition of Trivial Pursuit has this:

Q: What was the name of the aircraft Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier in.
A: The Bell X-1.

Bell X-1 was the type of aircraft.

Glamorous Glennis was the name.

But, then again, IJAG.

c_yeager
August 6, 2005, 03:45 AM
What am I missing here? If 228 covers weigh a total of 32,216 pounds, then each cover weighs 141.3 pounds (32,216 / 228 = 141.3). How then could each cover be made from 172 pounds of confiscated guns (or "the equivalent" thereof)? What happened to the other 30.7 pounds?

The guy went to art school, not school school.

The numbers also put the average weight of a confiscated gun at very nearly 3 pounds (2.87). Now, one has to assume that a lot of confiscated guns were small pistols, so how many deer rifles would it take to push the average that high?

griz
August 6, 2005, 06:54 AM
I like the irony that this wierd political message was apparently aimed (no pun intended) at school kids, yet they got the math horribly wrong.

280PLUS
August 6, 2005, 07:19 AM
One hundred custom-designed manhole covers, designed by artist Brad McCallum, were shown here, and turned over to the Metropolitan District Commission,

Now, where I come from 100 times 172 = 17,200. Where's the other 15,016 lbs?

Things that make you say, "Hmmmm...".

:rolleyes:

coonan357
August 7, 2005, 12:24 PM
do you have to wait for your ftip to go thru in order to posess on of these ?? :p and what form do you fill out ?? :rolleyes: love the saying he who preserves is victorioius on a sewer cover.

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