What to do about the shakes?


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Antjo
March 22, 2005, 10:23 AM
I went shooting the other day w/ a buddy of mine, and I got out my new AK-47 & my Sig 245. I noticed that after about 3 mags through the Sig 245 that I got really shaky. I've had it before, but if I shoot more than 3 times a week it usually goes away and stays away. However, I haven't shot in awhile and now I have the shakes. My buddy says the same thing happens to him.

I was wondering if this happens to everyone, if possibly it's muscle fatigue or something? And if so, is there some kind of exercise I can do so that if I don't shoot for awhile this won't happen?

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2400
March 22, 2005, 11:01 AM
Sounds like you need a little regular exercise and maybe something to eat before shooting.

Antjo
March 22, 2005, 11:11 AM
I do work 3rd shift and am usually tired when I go shooting in the mornings. I don't eat much either, got to get off this 3rd shift crap. Think that may be the problem. I exercise quite regularly, but I just wondered if there was some certain exercise that would help.

TimRB
March 22, 2005, 11:21 AM
"I was wondering if this happens to everyone, if possibly it's muscle fatigue or something?"

More info needed. Were you position shooting? If so, what position and how do you get into that position?

The goal in rifle position shooting is to have the rifle supported only by bone and not by muscle. If you are holding the rifle by muscle power alone, then you can, indeed, get shaky from fatigue.

Tim

M67
March 22, 2005, 12:30 PM
What kind of shakes?

If muscle fatigue, you need exercise. A gun doesn't way that much, but holding it steady is a very static use of muscles that most of us don't use much for other activities. Dry fire practice at home, if that's practical. Or lift and hold a light weight, like a bottle of water, while watching TV. Holding three pounds motionless at arm's lenght is very different from lifting a heavy object off the floor and dropping it again. Just be careful to warm up and stretch and don't overdo it. Static exercises can cause damage to muscles and tendons - think computer mouse syndrome.

Being in generally good shape helps. Running, swimming, whatever, will help you keep your breathing and heart rate under control. Being in shape helps you stay focused too, shooting is a mental sport and concentration takes a lot of energy. Ask a chess player.

Then there is the shift work. I do that too. Being tired doesn't lead to good shooting. Neither does drinking too much coffee. Irregular meals and the general stress the body is subjected to as a result of all this also influence shooting in a bad way. Believe me, I'm sort of an expert on this... People who work regular hours just do not understand. Not much to do about it, though. At least not if you like your job. :)

Bear Gulch
March 22, 2005, 01:11 PM
Strength training and working on flexibility. The longer you can be comfortable in your shooting position, the better you'll be able to concentrate and shoot.



BTW just to be a wise guy I was going to say have another drink! :neener:

WT
March 22, 2005, 01:33 PM
In the old days of bullseye target shooting, people would down a shot of bourbon to get rid of the shakes. Worked just fine. Not PC these days.

Graystar
March 22, 2005, 01:46 PM
Exercise and eat more veggies. Also increase your vitamin C consumption. Have an orange now and then.

Bear Gulch
March 22, 2005, 02:48 PM
Practice helps a lot. Most nonshooters don't understand the level of fitness required to be a good marksman.

Antjo
March 22, 2005, 07:49 PM
Thanks all for the advice, there's nothing more valuable than experience.

CAPTAIN MIKE
March 23, 2005, 08:10 AM
Okay Antjo, first we got to get you OFF that caffeinated coffee.
Second - time for a medical nutritional assessment of your needs.

GigaBuist
March 23, 2005, 11:46 AM
Psst... Antjo.. you forgot to mention that it only happens with autoloaders.

He can sit there all day banging away off hand with his .44 magnum or .357.. and they aren't light guns.

I think he was just afraid I'd butt-stroke him with my shotgun and run off with that Sig 245... made him a little nervous after a while. :)

Antjo
March 23, 2005, 10:34 PM
True, I am more comfortable with wheel guns. I have an AccuSport Bisley .44 mag, Ruger Blackhawk .41 mag, .357 mag Ruger Blawkhawk, .357 mag S&W 686 7-shot, & .44 mag Colt Anaconda. All of which do not effect me as autos seem to do. I'm able to shoot them all day without any shakes.

It's not that I'm afraid of Autos, it just seems that the recoil is very different and effects me differently. Can't understand it. It may just be sleep and diet, but can't help think that it may be something in technique that I've been missing.

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