Did you hear about the DumbA** recruite?


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Kendra Pacelli
March 30, 2005, 09:05 AM
I was watching Fox News last night and they came up with a story where a new police recruit shot himself in the knee while holstering his gun. His C/O stated that he had left his finger on the trigger which you were never, ever supposed to do, and they were taught that before range time. :what:

I laughed so hard I nearly fell out of bed! :evil:

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Tijeras_Slim
March 30, 2005, 09:08 AM
Lemme guess... combat tupperware? :rolleyes:

whm1974
March 30, 2005, 09:51 AM
Glocks are really unforgiven about people who ignore the third rule.

-Bill

Soap
March 30, 2005, 09:57 AM
Umm...any gun is unforgiving when you forget any rule. :rolleyes:

El Tejon
March 30, 2005, 10:29 AM
Funny? No. Gunshots hurt and I wouldn't wish one on any innocent (I count stupidity as innocence, at least unworthy of additional holes).

The Four Rules are Life. They apply even to highly-trained professionals in law enforcement, township, municipal, county, parish, state and federal.

HankB
March 30, 2005, 10:45 AM
Glocks are really unforgiven about people who ignore the third rule. Especially when you simultaneously violate the Second Rule as well. (It usually takes violation of at least two of the Four Rules for an injury to occur.)

DigMe
March 30, 2005, 11:16 AM
When I first started shooting pistols regularly the only pistol I had at the time was a S&W SW40VE. I was practicing quickly drawing, double-tapping and reholstering one day and I guess I got into too big of a hurry because I tried to reholster and then felt my finger hit the holster because it was still on the trigger! Luckily I pulled back before it went off. I've never been more greatful for a gun having a 12 lb pull!!

brad cook

MikeIsaj
March 30, 2005, 11:25 AM
Why would you ever have to quickly reholster? Tactical training should be well thought out and planned, and reflect practical responses to anticipated threats. I can't imagine any legal situation where I may want to quickly re-holster. Quite the contrary, it would take some time for me to come down off that level of alertness.

Regarding the origional subject; I wonder how long they had their weapons before they were taught good habits? I remember in the Marines they instilled safety and beat those bad habits out of you long before they gave you bullets.

Dave R
March 30, 2005, 12:19 PM
Umm...any gun is unforgiving when you forget any rule.

But guns with a manual safety are a little more forgiving. If it had been a cocked & locked 1911 (with safety applied) or any other pistol with a manual safety, he probably could've snagged the trigger and not had a discharge.

Not to let him off the hook for violating two of the 4 rules. I just have a preference for guns with a manual safety. I prefer their manual of arms. Its one of the things I don't like about Glocks, Kel-Tecs, etc.

Skunkabilly
March 30, 2005, 12:24 PM
What's a C/O?

Gotta give him credit for not blaming it on the gun though.

TechBrute
March 30, 2005, 12:35 PM
Commanding Officer?

ckyllo
March 30, 2005, 01:27 PM
was the guy saying right before it happend that he was the only one here professional enough to have a gun? oh wait it wasnt a DEA recruite was it?

Bear Gulch
March 30, 2005, 03:55 PM
Toting a glock will make you VERY aware of rule 3. But as been said injury requires 2 rule violations generally.

When it said Dumb *** recruit, I reflected upon my 18 charming months as a Drill Sergeant at thought: "Isn't that redundant?"

DigMe
March 30, 2005, 05:06 PM
Why would you ever have to quickly reholster?

You wouldn't. I was pretty inexperienced at the time and the part I was really trying to do quickly was the drawing and shooting. I wasn't particularly trying to do the reholstering fast but I was already thinking ahead to the next draw while I was reholstering and at the time "finger off the trigger" had not yet become second nature. I learned a lesson though and now the finger stays off trigger when gun isn't being fired. This was several years ago.

brad cook

Clean97GTI
March 30, 2005, 05:31 PM
Quickly reholstering sounds like a recruit got a little carried away.

The gun doesn't do you much good when it is in its holster. Draw quickly when you must and don't put it away until you don't need it anymore.

-edit- I'm going to throw in my 2¢ about manual safetys. They are nice when at the range and you haven't quite emptied the magazine. My feeling is that a manual safety is only a band-aid for an improper carry weapon.

Standing Wolf
March 30, 2005, 05:38 PM
...guns with a manual safety are a little more forgiving.

With all due respect, I've to disagree. In my opinion, reliance upon manual safeties encourages carelessness. As far as I'm concerned, safety mechanisms can be a good thing, but they're never—ever!—to be trusted, and they certainly don't take the place of the safety consciousness between a good shooter's ears.

flatdog
March 30, 2005, 06:01 PM
I don't think he would have been any safer with a manual safety. He wasn't concentrating on his immediate task. Kinda like trying to run upfield before you catch the ball.

Since he forgot to remove his finger from the trigger. There's a very good chance he would also miss hitting the safety .

But he learned and passed on his experience and that's good.

flatdog

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