Load layout for police


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Sactown
April 5, 2005, 08:13 PM
So one of my buddies is a cop. We were talking about how many rounds he carries. He's basically got 3 magazines. 1 in the gun and 2 spares. 13rnds each in the spares and 14 rounds in the gun. the gun is a .40 glock. is this a standard load? Do they ever carry more? I suggested that he keep at least an additional 2 mags at the ready in his patrol vehicle. Reasonable? I believe they have shotgun and ARs in their cars as well, but let's just keep it to his sidearm.

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Parallax
April 5, 2005, 08:21 PM
The cops I see here in FL have their handguns + 2 extra mags on their belts + whatever they carry in their cars.

12-34hom
April 5, 2005, 08:30 PM
That's @ what i carry, 1 - 16 rounder - 2 - 14 rounders on my duty belt. The 16 rounder is hardball - 2 -14 rounders are JHP - Triton 450smc.

Weight of my duty belt is my biggest concern, my ammo, gun, asp, radio, spray, cuffs all add up. 44 rounds of ammo is plenty IMHO. now if i were in a war zone, i would have no problem toting several more hi-caps on my person.

But each to his or her own.

12-34hom.

Zach S
April 5, 2005, 09:00 PM
Local departments carry two spares on their duty belts, doesnt matter if they have a G22 or a Sig 220. Most the officers I've spoke with on the subject carry at least two more in the vehicle within easier reach than the shotgun and/or AR in the trunk.

NMshooter
April 5, 2005, 09:05 PM
Two spare magazines is pretty standard, but many folks carrying a single stack pistol like to carry a third.

A couple boxes of ammo in the car are a good idea, and may be required depending on department regulations.

This is just a minimum for the sidearm.

Pilgrim
April 5, 2005, 09:39 PM
A few of our deputies and a sergeant started showing up at the range for training carrying four magazines (14 rounds each) on their belt plus the one in their pistol, for a grand total of 71 rounds. I asked the sergeant what was going on and he informed me it was necessary to have sufficient ammo on hand out in the 'sticks' where one's backup was maybe 10-15 minutes away.

I asked him if he knew of any of our deputies running out of ammo when we had revolvers and only carried 12 extra rounds. He didn't have an answer for me.

Pilgrim

Erik
April 5, 2005, 10:07 PM
From belt buckle moving to the right:

Horizontally mounted magazine carrier - two 12 round magazines.
Radiation detection "pager."
Firearm.
Pepper spray.
The back of my belt is basically bare. (Extra cuffs sometimes.)
Multitool.
Radio.
Asp.
Handcuff pouch.

Knife in gun side front pocket.
Hideaway on gun side boot.

I'm do not feel under supplied with the 37 rounds on my person.

yorec
April 5, 2005, 10:10 PM
Carried there fifteen round mag on my belt (2 spares and 1 in gun) and another ten in and speedloadered for my BUG for many years. Total - 56

But an incident made me subsitute my BUG for a full size gun one day and I found it rode so well that I just kept if up with another fifteen round mag on the off side in reserve for the last three years of my career. Grand total then was 77 rounds! (And I rode a bike - no car bound fat boy here... Well, at least I wasn't car bound! ;) )

Add the shotgun and rifle ammo, especially that which WAS left in the car... :what:

9mmepiphany
April 6, 2005, 01:51 AM
i tried to carry a full box of ammo, in mags when i was working patrol.

1. sig 226 (9mm) 3 mags+1=46 rounds
2. beretta 96 (.40) 5 mag (2 double pouches)+1= 51 rounds
3. sig 220 (.45) 5 mags (single quad carrier)+1= 41 rounds
4. issued 226R (.40) 3 mags (they only issued 2 spares)+1= 37 rounds :scrutiny:

except for the issued gun, i'll usually have at least a couple of loaded extra mags in my bag.

Clean97GTI
April 6, 2005, 02:00 AM
If you need more than the magazines on your belt, its time to switch guns.

stevelyn
April 6, 2005, 02:06 AM
Three 15 round mags plus the round in the chamber for a total of 46.
For the shotgun I have a fully loaded 50 round bandoleer hanging over the seat. The rounds are divided into #4 steel shot, 00 Buck, Foster slugs for people, and Brenneke slugs for bears and barricaded people. The majority of my SG load out is 00 Buck. I tend to use my SG a lot, especially in the summer it's nearly a nightly occurance.

psyopspec
April 6, 2005, 02:06 AM
The local dept. here carries Glock 22s with two spare mags on the belt. For those that advocate more handgun ammo in the vehicle, I must ask: what's the point of the extra mags in the car when an officer could just go for the shotgun or AR mounted between the seats?

Zach S
April 6, 2005, 02:23 AM
Not all cruisers have them mounted between the seats, some keep longarms in the trunk instead.

trooper
April 6, 2005, 04:25 PM
Hmm... let's see... from right to left side all around my back it's my firearm (H&K P2000 with a 13-rounder), pepper spray, handcuffs, flashlight holder, 1 spare magazine (16 rd.)

I must be terribly underequipped ;)

Chief101
April 6, 2005, 09:57 PM
From my buckle going to the right, two mags, 16rds. Kimber .45acp 9rds. ASP baton (26), gerber multi-tool, handcuff, handcuff,pepper spray, radio holder, flashlight ring.......

I've been doing this long enough to have carried a revolver and 18 extra rounds in loops. I never felt "underguned". But times change. I was always taught and continue to believe that a handgun is a tool best used to get back to your long gun.

swacje41
April 7, 2005, 12:33 AM
I asked him if he knew of any of our deputies running out of ammo when we had revolvers and only carried 12 extra rounds. He didn't have an answer for me.
That is a good point. In spite of the hype, a good study by Greg Morrison and David Armstrong several years back found that the typical 18-round load of the older generation of police was sufficient for virtually all law enforcement shootings.

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