SIG DAK vs SIG DAO


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Alan Fud
May 1, 2005, 10:14 PM
What's the difference between Sig's DAK trigger (such as on the 229) and Sig's DAO trigger (such as on the 239) ?

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Dienekes
May 2, 2005, 12:38 AM
One of the gun rags had a fairly long article on this recently. The author blathered on about everything except what you wanted to know in the first place--how it worked. By reading it three times and squinting I got the impression that it's a partial reset system.

I have had my SIG 220 set up in both conventional DA/SA and DAO. I was not too impressed with the DAO so I sort of hoped the DAK system was better--even though it's now rather academic to me.

I guess I will get excited when semiauto DA pulls get half as good as a K frame S&W revolver.

Cawdor
May 2, 2005, 07:31 PM
Both are DAO designs. The DAK features a design that reduces the weight of the trigger pull from a conventional DAO.

I dry fired a DAO P239 and a DAK P226 at the NRA show in Houston. The DAK had a noticeably lighter trigger pull.

The DAK feels like a DA revolver. You feel the same resistance throughout the trigger pull. It is not like a Glock, a Walther P99QA, the HK LEM trigger, or a ParaOrdnance LDA.

Jim Watson
May 2, 2005, 08:02 PM
The DAK starts in a semi-cocked state. The Sigarms rep told me that was not really what was going on but the basic trigger pull was some smoother and a good deal lighter than a DAO or DA/SA. It also has second strike capability, but with a noticeably heavier pull. So I figure there must be some setup to pretension the mainspring in normal operation.

I think it would be worth a look, especially if you could shoot one and compare it versus the crunch-tick of a DA/SA gun. It is much better than the regular DAO.

Warbow
May 2, 2005, 09:26 PM
I remember reading a post by Todd Green (guy who works at SIGARMS) at SIGforum a while back explaining it as a system to prevent short stroking of the trigger while firing under stress. There's the normal 6.5lb pull from the full reset position along with a heavier pull (9.5lbs IIRC) that can be achieved if the trigger is not reset fully. Whereas with DAO there's only one reset position and if you short stroke the trigger it's not going to fire.

Cawdor
May 3, 2005, 07:06 PM
When I dry fired the P226 DAK, I did not notice any difference between the first and second dry fires, i.e., the trigger was pulled and the slide was not cycled. With my P2000 LEM, if I dry fire the gun and do not cycle the slide, the pull goes from about 7.5 lbs. to about 15 lbs.

I don't know whether the slide has to be cycled to reduce the trigger pull. However, Sig's web site says that the lighter trigger pull is achieved without putting the mainspring or the firing pin spring under tension.

P226R DAK (http://www.sigarms.com/products/classicfullsize-models.asp?product_id=213)

Warbow
May 3, 2005, 08:10 PM
When I dry fired the P226 DAK, I did not notice any difference between the first and second dry fires, i.e., the trigger was pulled and the slide was not cycled.

If you let the trigger reset all the way forward it will be the same 6.5lb pull. The heavier pull comes from the intermediate reset position that happens before the trigger goes all the way forward.

mmike87
May 3, 2005, 09:06 PM
Neither of the two DAK's I have handled had anything that could remotely be called "heavy."

Long, perhaps - but heavy? No way. Regardless, the smoooothness of the DAK system is, IMO, what makes it so fantastic - IF you are in the market for a DAO type handgun.

I personally feel that the DAK is the best DAO trigger system on any auto I have personally handled or shot. I am admittedly partial to SIG's, I admit. :)

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