The Origins of Kwaanza


PDA






rock jock
December 26, 2002, 05:42 PM
Find out where this holiday really came from.

http://www.townhall.com/columnists/anncoulter/ac20021226.shtml

If you enjoyed reading about "The Origins of Kwaanza" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Cliff
December 26, 2002, 06:01 PM
My father was KCPD from "59" to "86",detective rank at retirement. Needless to say he had a few stories about the panthers and also about United Slaves which is one of the reasons why we never celebrated Kwanzaa in our household when I was a kid,and never celebrate it now.

Malone LaVeigh
December 26, 2002, 06:18 PM
Wow. I actually agree with most of an Ann Coulter article. :eek:

M1911
December 26, 2002, 10:05 PM
Is there anyone in the US who actually does celebrate Kwaanza (sp?).

Ed Brunner
December 26, 2002, 10:11 PM
It is also the only game in town. There is nothing wrong with honoring one's heritage or celebrating one's roots. I can see from the article that the origins of Kwaanza are apparently subject to questions of motive and/or historical propriety.

Surely George W had all this background before he proclaimed Happy Kwaanza, so he might have been thinking that honoring our ancestors can be a noble thing as well as providing a key to self improvement.

dadman
December 26, 2002, 10:24 PM
Any other links or evidence confirming the story's claim of Ron Karenga being a FBI "dupe" and "stooge"?
Will do some looking into in the meantime.

pax
December 27, 2002, 01:50 AM
Who cares "where it came from"? I mean, what does that really matter?

What matters is what it means now, to the people who celebrate it. I suppose if people were (and I suppose some are) celebrating Kwanzaa as a racist, terrorist statement, that'd be one thing.

But I suspect most folks who celebrate Kwanzaa just think of it as a cool celebration of their racial heritage and don't give a poop about its real roots. Just as most people who celebrate Halloween, neither know nor care how its traditions got started -- and just as most folks who celebrate Christmas have no idea where (for instance) the Christmas tree came from.

What matters is what it means, now, to the participants.

pax

You may ask, How did this tradition get started? I'll tell you: I don't know. But it's a tradition! -- Tevye in the movie version of Fiddler on the Roof

rock jock
December 27, 2002, 01:59 AM
Actually, I do think the origins if a particular celebration matter. BUT, even if doesn't, don't the people who celebrate it have a right to know the facts? Then they can decide for themselves if it worth continuing, or if its tainted history makes it unworthy for association with the black community.

Blackhawk
December 27, 2002, 02:03 AM
I've got no use for traditions that are younger than I am.

Preacherman
December 27, 2002, 02:07 AM
I guess it's a bit like Christmas. There are those (including me) who find it a deeply spiritual feast, and focus on its original meaning. There are those who are agnostic or atheist, who don't pay any attention to its original meaning, but use it as an occasion for gift-giving, holidays, etc. There are even a few pagans around who remember that the Church "baptized" a pagan feast (midwinter) in order to get people who were already used to celebrating at that time of year, to celebrate something Christian, and they try to celebrate the old pagan rituals at this time of year. Jews and Muslims don't celebrate Christmas at all, but I'm sure they enjoy the day off! Many interpretations and celebrations of the same feast. I guess Kwanzaa falls into a similar classification: meaningful to some, irrelevant to others.

Gordon
December 27, 2002, 02:19 AM
Aw come on we all know Jesse Jackson invented Kwanza to cash in on the holiday bucks.:D

rock jock
December 27, 2002, 02:28 AM
Aw come on we all know Jesse Jackson invented Kwanza to cash in on the holiday bucks.
Actually, I'm of the opinion that Hallmark had a hand in every Congressional declaration of a holiday.

westex
December 27, 2002, 02:43 AM
I've got a holiday I'd like to start but it would probably be locked down. Would it be the first on THR? If so I might give complete details, including secret rituals, just to have the honor of causing the first lock down.:cool:

BamBam
December 27, 2002, 03:00 AM
I feel that Kwaanza is another tool to divide our country.
Do we really need the wedge driven deeper?

David Scott
December 27, 2002, 09:21 AM
Neither Ms. Coulter nor townhall.org can be considered an unbiased source. I'd want independent verification before I bought into something like this.

dadman
December 27, 2002, 10:05 AM
Kwanzaa was created in 1966 by Ron Karenga was denounced by the Black Panthers in 1969, and was sentenced in 1971 for counts of felonious assault and false imprisonment.
Is it safe to assume that Mr. Karenga is a black seperatist and supremist?
I have to question someones sanity for participating in a phony holiday created by a lunatic.

http://http://dartreview.com/issues/1.15.01/kwanzaa.html
The Story of Kwanzaa
From the Dartmouth Review
On December 26, 1966 Ron Karenga and his family and friends lit the Unity candle, the Umoja candle, and commenced the first Kwanzaa.

Kwanzaa has only gained popularity since. On December 24, 1971 the New York Times ran their first article covering the festival, and recently the Postal Service released a Kwanzaa stamp. Hallmark, too, has begun to market the holiday.

Seven principles--one for each day of the feast--guide the celebration: Umoja, Kujichagulia, Ujima, Ujamaa, Nia, Kuumba, and Imani. In English, the principles are unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith. Today, the holiday does not serve as a replacement for religious holidays, although it may, but rather is a secular event aimed at encouraging American blacks to remember their African roots.

The founder of Kwanzaa, Ron Everett, a.k.a. Maulana Ron Karenga, stood at the forefront of the black power movement in the 1960s. Karenga distinguished himself as a "cultural nationalist" as opposed to a traditional Marxist. In 1965 Karenga founded the United Slaves Organization (US), a group that would rival the Black Panthers on the UCLA campus. The US was more radical than the Panthers, setting off quarrels between the two.

The biggest dispute between the US and the Panthers centered around the leadership of the new Afro-American Studies department at UCLA; both groups backed a different candidate. On January 17, 1969, 150 students gathered to discuss the situation. Panthers John Jerome Huggins and Alprentice Carter used the meeting to verbally attack Karenga, much to the dismay of his followers. Two US members, George and Larry Stiner, confronted Huggins and Carter in a hallway after the meeting and shot and killed them.

A May 11, 1969 letter in The Black Panther officially denounced Karenga. Wilbur Grattan, the Minister of State and Foreign Affairs of the "Republic of New Africa," wrote to Bobby Seale: "Speaking in the position of Minister of State and Foreign Affairs for RNA, I have always felt that Ron Karenga represented a great deal less than the best interests of the Black Liberation struggle against domestic colonialism, white racism, and world-wide imperialism."

This, however, did not faze Karenga, who continued to build and strengthen the US. Members of the US followed the "Path of Blackness" detailed in The Quotable Karenga, authored by Karenga himself. "The sevenfold path of blackness is think black, talk black, act black, create black, buy black, vote black, and live black," the book states.

The US would not last too much longer. On September 17, 1971, Karenga was sentenced to one to ten years in prison on counts of felonious assault and false imprisonment. The charges stemmed from a May 9, 1970 incident in which Karenga and two others tortured two women who Karenga believed had tried to kill him by placing "crystals" in his food and water.

A year later the Los Angeles Times described the events: "Deborah Jones, who once was given the title of an African queen, said she and Gail Davis were whipped with an electrical cord and beaten with a karate baton after being ordered to remove their clothes. She testified that a hot soldering iron was placed in Miss Davis' mouth and placed against Miss Davis' face and that one of her own big toes was tightened in a vice. Karenga, head of US, also put detergent and running hoses in their mouths, she said."

The shooting at UCLA caused Karenga to become deeply paranoid and spurred his bizarre behavior. At his trial, the question of Karenga's sanity arose. The psychiatrist's report stated, "This man now represents a picture which can be considered both paranoid and schizophrenic with hallucinations and elusions, inappropriate affect, disorganization, and impaired contact with the environment." The psychiatrist observed that Karenga talked to his blanket and imaginary persons and believed that he had been attacked by dive-bombers.

Eight years later California State University at Long Beach made Karenga the head of its Black Studies Department. Karenga had toned down his rhetoric and abandoned his cultural nationalism for straightforward Marxism. As an academic Karenga has authored various books on such topics as Egyptian art and has guest lectured at Stanford.

Initially, Kwanzaa proceeded from Karenga's hostility toward Western religion, which, he wrote in his 1980 book, Kawaida Theory, "denies and diminishes human worth, capacity, potential and achievement. In Christian and Jewish mythology, humans are born in sin, cursed with mythical ancestors who've sinned and brought the wrath of an angry God on every generation's head." He similarly opposed belief in God and other "spooks who threaten us if we don't worship them and demand we turn over our destiny and daily lives."

Thus, Karenga explained in his 1977 Kwanzaa: Origin, Concepts, Practice, "Kwanzaa is not an imitation, but an alternative, in fact, an oppositional alternative to the spookism, mysticism and non-earth based practices which plague us as a people and encourage our withdrawal from social life rather than our bold confrontation with it." The holiday "was chosen to give a Black alternative to the existing holiday and give Blacks an opportunity to celebrate themselves and history rather than simply imitate the practice of the dominant society."

Since then, the holiday has gained mainstream adherents, and Karenga has altered its justification so as not to alienate practicing Christians: "Kwanzaa was not created to give people an alternative to their own religion or religious holiday," he writes in Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family, Community, and Culture, published in 1997.

Still, some charge that the holiday and its official black, green, and red flag promotes racial separatism and violence. Says the official Kwanzaa Information Center: "red, or the blood, stands as the top of all things. We lost our land through blood; and we cannot gain it except through blood. We must redeem our lives through the blood. Without the shedding of blood there can be no redemption of this race." The Kwanzaa Information Center also notes that the flag "has become the symbol of devotion for African people in America to establish an independent African nation on the North American Continent."

James Coleman, a former Black Panther, argues, "By only stressing the unity of black people, Kwanzaa separates black people from the rest of Americans. Americans must unify on whatever principles ensure we live in a safe, prosperous, God-loving country, with the race and ethnicity of any American seeking to abide by those principles being of no consequence."

—J. Lawrence Scholer and the Editors

Orgins do affect whether to celebrate or not.

dadman
December 27, 2002, 10:18 AM
More reasons NOT to celabrate Kwanzaa:

http://http://www.newsmax.com/articles/?a=2000/1/1/51109

How Kwanzaa Cons You

Michael Savage
January 1, 2000

Warning: Michael Savage is the most exciting and controversial radio host in America. The views expressed here are his own. Certified liberals and politically correct individuals should proceed with caution.
If you're Black and celebrate Kwanzaa, would you drop the celebration if you learned that it's not from Africa but that it's a complete invention, that it's out of Orwell, not out of Africa? Would you give up the candles, incense, and the other paraphernalia that you enjoy so much if you discovered that it's a bogus holiday?

This is what the founder himself, Ron Karenga, had to say about Kwanzaa in a Washington Post interview of many years ago: "People think it's African, but it's not. I came up with Kwanzaa because Black people wouldn't celebrate it if they knew it was American. Also, I put it around Christmas because I knew that's when a lot of Bloods are partying."

But now-a-days this simple fact, admitted by Karenga himself, is ignored by the press. In fact most of the criminal records of Ron Karenga, a former radical Black-student leader who later became a Marxist and a professor of Black Studies, have been ignored and have strangely disappeared. The left media and cowardly college administrators don't want you to know about Karenga's felonious past in the radical ‘60s and ‘70s and that Kwanzaa is a bogus holiday. They want to hide the fact that Kwanzaa has become just one more White-liberal manipulation of Blacks instead of a legitimate holiday for them. It fits the leftist paranoia that Blacks have been robbed of their heritage by the mean and cruel Whites. It's just one more gimmick to stir up racial hatred in this country in preparation for the Orwellian paradise the red diaper-doper babies have in store for us.

But if we follow the lies of the liberal fanatics, then most Americans today, including Whites, would have to conclude that they've been "robbed" of their roots as well. Few of us celebrate the same holidays or continue the same customs as our old-world ancestors. Maybe once a year we should join hands, dance around the phallus, and bow to the moon.

Karenga and the other "Black Roots" people didn't get their geography straight, either. Somehow they latched onto Swahili as their ancestral tongue. Just look at your map. Swahili is a language of the African east coast. Yet most of the African slaves in America were from the west coast, thousands of miles away, where they spoke completely different languages and had very different customs than in the east.

I do want to say this about Kwanzaa: I admire Karenga's imagination in inventing it, but I certainly wouldn't celebrate a bogus holiday myself. Anyone who can create a religion in his own time and sell the cards, candles, and paraphernalia, and make a go of it, must be a gifted entrepreneur. My research also tells me that Karenga is not a racist. In fact, the best research on Ron Karenga reveals no violence against Whites by him or his followers. He had an excellent relationship with former Los Angeles Mayor Sam Yorty. He met with then Governor Ronald Reagan and other white politicians. But, according to the research, Karenga did have strong contempt for other Blacks.

In any event, we live in a country where we have freedom of religion, so Maulana (Master Teacher) Karenga (born Ron. N. Everett) can believe and practice whatever he wants. You have the right to worship anything at all. You can even prostrate yourself before chicken feathers mixed with the blood of a menstruating cow if that's your belief. It's your right. Freedom of conscience is the most important fundament of this nation. It's something no one else can decide for you. We should let no one take it from us. God will be the final arbiter, not talking-heads on the evening news, not sensitivity trainers, touchy-feely counselors, lesbian school teachers, or even the ACLU.

When the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia religion was attacked first, as the "opiate of the masses"! Hitler attacked the church in Germany, making himself God, the Nazi Party the new State Church. So even a bogus religion may be preferable to a demonic, soulless bureaucracy run by smiling talkers of double-speak.

The Founding Fathers guaranteed us "freedom of religion" not "freedom from religion." This purposeful deception, fostered by the ACLU, is perhaps the paramount achievement of the radical left in this God-fearing nation.

Do a search at Newsmax and Yahoo about Kwanzaa, and Ron Karenga. Still want to celebrate?
What if a white seperatist or supremist with a violent past invented a white heratige holiday. Would it be right to celebrate it decades later as honoring Western European heratige and values?
end of article

Light up the candles, I'm going to invent a holiday!

rock jock
December 27, 2002, 12:13 PM
Light up the candles, I'm going to invent a holiday!
Happy Festivus to everyone! (for all you Seinfeld fans)

2nd Amendment
December 27, 2002, 01:02 PM
Coulter and Townhall are as unbiased and dependable as CNN and NBC. Think about that.

Regardless, Kwanza-a-a-a-a-a-a-a is a purely political tool and its' only celebrants are involved purely for the racial aspects. It's a divisive afront and I was very disappointed that Bush acknowledged it in such a way. of coure, Bush seldom fails to disappoint me.

80fl
December 27, 2002, 01:21 PM
Just more affirmation that Bush and the Republicrats are nothing more than political whores. (This coming from a registered repub. who voted for the bush:( ) Oh well, I am learning.

Big Al
December 27, 2002, 01:42 PM
I saw a Man Show Christmas man-o-vation (holiday-o-vation) that was called "The Grinch That Stole Kwanzaa".

cuchulainn
December 27, 2002, 01:44 PM
This reminds me of those articles that come out near Independence Day informing us that the Founders were a bunch of slave owners who denied women the vote and stole land from the Indians ... thinly veiled ad hominem.

Pax is right.


or if its tainted history makes it unworthy for association with the black community.

Actually, Christianity (and its holidays) is very worthy of association despite its history tainted much worse than Kwanzaa.

...How to take the high road on this question...

Rock jock, over on TFL you seemed to consistently make jabs at the black leadership. Why? I'm not calling you a racist :) but it's a curious pattern. You seem to have a grudge.


I've got no use for traditions that are younger than I am.

I assume then that you would have refused to celebrate Armistice Day (Veterans Day) if you had been born before WWI? And you think that the tradition of Vietnam vets leaving momentos at the wall in D.C. is sheep pie, right? And that yellow ribbon stuff? Sheesh! ;)


Also, I put it around Christmas because I knew that's when a lot of Bloods are partying."

Sounds like early Christian leaders putting Christmas around Saturnalia because they knew that's when a lot of Romans were partying.


its' only celebrants are involved purely for the racial aspects. It's a divisive afront and I was very disappointed that Bush acknowledged it in such a way.

But I like St. Patrick's Day and I'm very proud of my racial heritage ... even though I'm aware that St. Paddy's Day as celebrated in the U.S. is nothing but a Fenian invention created to build pride among the down trodden Irish of the late 19th century.

The Fenians were radical revolutionaries, BTW, the forerunners of the IRA.

2nd Amendment
December 27, 2002, 01:57 PM
Do we currently have racial tensions and government mandated quotas for Irish? If so I need to sign up for the latter. Your analogy fails.

As for Rock Jock taking jabs at black "leadership", why shouldn't he, or any thinking individual. This "leadership" spends its' time telling an entire race they can't make it, that it's all Whiteys fault and that big gubbermint, regulation and violence are the answers. Oh, those things and sending lots of money to Jesse, Al, et al.

duck hunt
December 27, 2002, 02:06 PM
:rolleyes: And I suppose we should throw out Christianity because of the Inquisition.

Regardless of its origins (and I think few people are unaware that Kwanzaa is a very young, very American-born holiday, unless they live in a cave), Kwanzaa has an excellent message, especially for kids. The seven principles, in a nutshell, are unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith -- all positive concepts that anyone can appreciate. It's non-denominational, so anyone can celebrate, whether Jewish, Christian, Muslim or non-religious.

I used Kwanzaa last year as my December social skills unit for fourth graders. We had a blast doing crafts and games, and the kids learned something positive for each of the principles. And, since it was non-religious, I didn't have the public school PC police breathing down my neck. The only hangup was the one nine year old who said "Oh, no! If World War Two taught us anything, it's that you can't trust the Chinese -- and that's why I'll never celebrate Kwanzaa!" But then, that kid threw a monkey wrench into everything...that's why he was my favorite.
:cool:

cuchulainn
December 27, 2002, 02:13 PM
Do we currently have racial tensions and government mandated quotas for Irish? If so I need to sign up for the latter. Your analogy fails.

So 50-100 years from now, if the racial tensions die down, Kwanzaa will be OK, but not now? And St. Paddy's Day was horrible in 1898 because it stirred racial tension but OK now?

:confused:


Let rock jock speak for himself.

And if I didn't think he should speak on the matter, I wouldn't have asked him to talk about it more :rolleyes:

clem
December 27, 2002, 02:31 PM
I love the holidays, I celebrated Christmas this year by buying myself a new (used) pistol, yesterday. (AMT Auto-Mag II, .22 MAG.).

And I'm going to celebrate Kwanzaa by going out and shooting it tomorrow!

I've got to do this because my ancestors were forcefully deported from Canada by the British and put into "indentured servitude" (white slavery), when they landed at New Orelans (1753, still a French possession).

So, I know the value of the 2ND Amend. and will respect it as much as I can.

pax
December 31, 2002, 03:21 PM
Season's greetings.... http://www.presenceofmind.net/GSW/Greetings.html

pax

There just isn't any pleasing some people. The trick is to stop trying. -- Joel Rosenberg

roscoe
December 31, 2002, 03:31 PM
How exactly is this firearm related?

duck hunt
December 31, 2002, 03:36 PM
but God Bless Clem; he sure gave it the old college try!;)

gburner
December 31, 2002, 03:46 PM
In the words of that great Libertarian, Homer J. Simpson
(as he throttled Bart), "I'LL
KWAANZA YOU......!"

nualle
December 31, 2002, 04:58 PM
dadman said:
I have to question someones sanity for participating in a phony holiday created by a lunatic.
Funny... someone named Celsus stated some similar sentiments back in the 170s-180s. The people he was talking about succeeded so well, we have to trust their own report of what he said about them. They burned all the copies of his own works, such that none survive now.

Wildalaska
December 31, 2002, 06:35 PM
And whats all this have to do with guns???

Zander
December 31, 2002, 07:51 PM
Neither Ms. Coulter nor townhall.org can be considered an unbiased source. -- David ScottWhat, exactly, do you find questionable?

Further proof...

http://www.frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=5251

dadman
January 1, 2003, 12:50 AM
nualle said:
Funny... someone named Celsus stated some similar sentiments back in the 170s-180s. The people he was talking about succeeded so well, we have to trust their own report of what he said about them. They burned all the copies of his own works, such that none survive now.

I recommend reading the complete works of Josephus, and Origens reply to Celsus at http://http://www.ccel.org/fathers2/ANF-04/anf04-55.htm#TopOfPage and http://http://www.preteristarchive.com/ChurchHistory/origen_celsus_01.html

We in the present day have very recent records to research the orgins of Kwanzaa.

Betty
January 1, 2003, 01:08 AM
And whats all this have to do with guns???

Nothing?

If you enjoyed reading about "The Origins of Kwaanza" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!