Federal Express, The Feds and The End User, that's you, if still so inclined


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alan
May 29, 2005, 06:40 PM
Should reference to Rick Stanley be off putting, the following originated elsewhere, and it seems was written about in The Wall Street Journal, which usually is pretty level headed.

Re If you haven't done anything wrong, you have nothing to fear, a thought sometimes heard, that idea never held water for me. Does it for you? As to this Soverign Society Offshore, their name is new to me. Had you heard of it?


We the People Scoop 05/27/05 ** Special Edition **
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WE THE PEOPLE SCOOP - TO EXPOSE! **
** Visit the website: http://www.stanley2002.org **
** Like the Scoop? Forward it to everyone you know! **
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OPINION RELEASE: Where the Business of Snooping Gets Done. A-Letter. 05.27.


Subject: Where the Business of Snooping Gets Done. A-Letter. 05.27.05.


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THE SOVEREIGN SOCIETY OFFSHORE A-LETTER
Your Link to Freedom, Privacy & Prosperity in the Offshore World
Friday, May 27, 2005 - Vol. 7 No. 107

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COMMENT: Where the Business of Snooping Gets Done.

Dear A-Letter Reader:
Federal Express is famous for its overnight deliveries, and
now it may have become, overnight, the one delivery company
to avoid at all costs -- if you value your personal and
financial privacy.

A front page Wall Street Journal feature article (5/26) details
how FedEx voluntarily has become a willing partner to the US
federal police establishment, turning over names, addresses,
credit card information and lists of when and where FedEx
customers send and receive packages.

Mind you, this is done under the guise of 'fighting terrorism,'
since FedEx management decided soon after the 9-11 terror attacks
that it would cooperate with almost any government information
request. In the past FedEx and most other delivery companies
insisted on a valid search warrant or court order before
surrendering customer information. UPS says it still follows
that traditional rule.

But FedEx has gone further, granting US Customs inspectors
access to the company's database of international shipments,
including names and address of shippers, package origin and
destination, credit card information and payment details
(names of banks), all things the US government is not
entitled to outside of a criminal investigation. 'Our guys
just love it,' says one senior Customs official overseeing
inspections at international courier companies.

I'll just bet they do love it -- and you can also be sure
that the FBI and other police do not confine their use of
all this information to terrorism investigations. It is
well known that PATRIOT Act powers, supposedly aimed at
suspected terrorists, have been used to nab phone solicitors,
nightclubs in Las Vegas, CD-counterfeiters, even a call girl
ring in New Orleans. Now FedEx has opened a whole new universe
of people for eager government snoops.

This is a replay, for much bigger stakes, of what the IRS
did four years ago with credit cards issued by offshore
banks, alleged to be used to evade taxes. Because VISA,
MasterCard and AmEx processed the offshore card charges in
US facilities, the IRS got court orders to grab millions of
card transactions without the names attached. Only AmEx
stood up for card holder privacy and the others caved in to
the IRS. About a thousand people out of what the IRS claimed
were millions fessed up during a phony IRS amnesty.

At least the credit card companies, however misguided, were
co-operating in investigations of a specific alleged crime.
FedEx, on the hand, is laying wide open customers for no better
reason than their flag waving management wants to do so.

What makes all this even more horrific (and illegal) is that
these demands for information often are based on nothing more
than government bureaucrats accusations, not on due process
search warrants or any other judicial review.

One of the current FedEx slogans is 'Where the business of
shipping gets done.' Just change 'shipping' to 'snooping' --
and plan accordingly.

That's the way it looks from here.
Bob Bauman, Editor

PS: If you do business with an offshore bank account in a
nation that has ironclad financial privacy laws, you wont
have to worry about FedEx or other sell-out companies. Click
here for privacy - http://www.agora-inc.com/reports/SVS/WSVSF528/
==================================================
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COMMENT LINKS:
* US Government finds a surprising ally: FedEx.
LINK: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05146/510879.stm
* IRS Credit Card Scare in 2002.
LINK: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,50025,00.html
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WEALTH:

* SOME AMERICANS ARE CONCERNED

"A frightening prospect for Americans; an unfettered national
police force with the sole discretion to determine who can be
investigated as a potential terrorist. That's the impact of
little-known proposals to greatly expand the powers of the FBI,
permitting its agents to seize business records without a warrant
and to track the mail of those in terrorist inquiries without
regard to Postal Service concerns.'

* Voice from the hinterlands; FBI powers become fearsome.

==================================================
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THE SOVEREIGN SOCIETY Ltd., 5 Catherine St., Waterford, Ireland
TEL: 353-51 844 068 FAX: 353-51 304 561
All contents COPYRIGHT (C) 2005 by Sovereign Society Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction of all or part of this document in any form is prohibited without express written consent of Sovereign Society. Protected by US copyright laws 17 USC 101 et seq., 18 USC 2319; violations punishable by 5 years imprisonment and/or $250,000 in fines.

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Vernal45
May 29, 2005, 06:43 PM
This just cant be true. We are not a Police State. :scrutiny: ;)

Standing Wolf
May 29, 2005, 07:08 PM
This just cant be true. We are not a Police State.

We're all growing accustomed to business and bureaucratic intrusions small and large. There's really no need to become a police state if we can turn everyone into an informant.

RevDisk
May 29, 2005, 07:25 PM
I'm gonna send a letter to FedEx telling them UPS now has my exclusive business, and I will encourage others to make the switch.

I'm sure UPS has some horror stories too. But my personal experiences have thus far been positive. Just recently, I called UPS because the sender did not include my apt number on the package. Within 20 seconds of me dialing the 800, I was speaking to an American that spoke flawless English, who took the time to read back all of the information to make sure it was positively correct. He said it'd likely be delivered Monday, but he'd see what he could do. Within two hours, my AK mags were delivered.

Until I hear horror stories, UPS has my business, and FedEx can go to Hades.

jefnvk
May 29, 2005, 07:32 PM
It will just be a matter of time before UPS decides that it is a good idea.

Although, I'm still sticking with FedEx. UPS has caused me enough problems to never get my business again.

DMF
May 29, 2005, 07:57 PM
Anyone got anything more reliable than Rick Stanley to suggest this is even close to being accurate?

alan
May 30, 2005, 01:28 PM
DMF asks:

Anyone got anything more reliable than Rick Stanley to suggest this is even close to being accurate?

DMF and any others who might have question about Mr. Stanley as the "source" for anything, please note, in the material I posted, the following, re sourcing.

1. Reference to the 26 May issue of Wall Street Journal
2. Reference to THE SOVEREIGN SOCIETY OFFSHORE A-LETTER
Your Link to Freedom, Privacy & Prosperity in the Offshore World
Friday, May 27, 2005 - Vol. 7 No. 107. You might try a Google search (google.com), for information on this group.
3. The followingCOMMENT LINKS:
* US Government finds a surprising ally: FedEx.
LINK: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05146/510879.stm
* IRS Credit Card Scare in 2002.
LINK: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,50025,00.html
These links appear at the end of the article. They have no relationship with or to Mr. Stanley mere mention of whose name tends to put some people off.

Risasi
May 31, 2005, 07:20 PM
Sounds like the perfect opportunity to start up a new business.

NQA Delivery Service
"We don't ask questions, we just deliver"

:evil:

jnojr
May 31, 2005, 08:15 PM
I'm gonna send a letter to FedEx telling them UPS now has my exclusive business, and I will encourage others to make the switch.

I wouldn't. They'll probably forward that letter to the FBI and report you as someone who clearly has "something to hide".

Expect the black helicopters shortly...

alan
June 1, 2005, 01:51 AM
jnojr Quote:
I'm gonna send a letter to FedEx telling them UPS now has my exclusive business, and I will encourage others to make the switch.



I wouldn't. They'll probably forward that letter to the FBI and report you as someone who clearly has "something to hide".

Expect the black helicopters shortly...

If it makes you feel better, by all means, write your letter. I believe that you should recognize the following though, if you haven't already. The decision(s) represented by FedEx action/antics was taken as the highest corporate levels. Your e-mails, phone calls, letters or cuniform writings on baked clay tablets will NEVER get anywhere near to those people.

As to any interest the FBI might have in you, based on an ordinary letter of complaint, one what says something to the following effect: You People Suck. I'm Going To Take My Business Elsewhere, don't flatter yourself. Even bunglers akin to The FBI can find better ways to amuse themselves.

Once upon a time, a looong time ago, I had what was then a fairly high level security clearance. The Fan Belt Inspectors did the investigation, and strange to note, they called my attention to the fact that I had transposed the addresss in two towns I had once lived in. An agent even gave me a corrected copy. That was way back in 1955, I know I'm old, please don't remind me.

Anyhow, assuming that they have read any of the correspondence, over many years, that might have been called to their attention, or that I had addressed to them myself, I doubt that I would be security cleared today, though one can never tell about that sort of thing. I suppose it depends on the quality of the readers sense of humor.

ravinraven
June 1, 2005, 03:40 AM
"This just cant be true. We are not a Police State."

hehhehhehheh, etc, for twenty-five pages.

Good one.

rr

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