What now-popular Guns/cartridges were labeled "flash in the pan" when new?


PDA






MatthewVanitas
July 2, 2005, 07:40 PM
Just curious, since I am but a young whippersnapper. For those of you who've been around, what now-common firearms were most denigrated when new?

What "answers to questions nobody asked" have become loved American classics over the last half-century?

"Still, thou art blest, compar'd wi' me!
The present only toucheth thee:
But Och! I backward cast my e'e,
On prospects drear!
An' forward, tho' I canna see,
I guess an' fear!"

-Robert Burns, "To a Mouse"

If you enjoyed reading about "What now-popular Guns/cartridges were labeled "flash in the pan" when new?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
KriegHund
July 2, 2005, 08:20 PM
Huh...would the .40 S&W classify?

CajunBass
July 2, 2005, 08:30 PM
I think in my life, the 9mm is one. When I was young, a 9mm was sort of rare althought it had been around for years of course. The only ones I ever heard of were "German Lugers", and P-38's. S&W had the Model 39, but that was about it, at least that I knew of.

DorGunR
July 2, 2005, 09:04 PM
The BHP in 9mm has been around since 1935.

Jason M.
July 2, 2005, 09:44 PM
I think the .357 Magnum was decried as too powerful and useless, wasn't it?

Preacherman
July 2, 2005, 10:25 PM
Probably the Gatling gun was pretty derided... don't forget Custer left his Gatlings behind at the Little Big Horn because they were "too cumbersome" and would "slow him down"!!! :what:

Gewehr98
July 2, 2005, 11:02 PM
Although they're still popular. (This week) :D

VARifleman
July 2, 2005, 11:13 PM
Short Magnums.
6.5-.284 is one of the top long range rounds right now, hence why you're totally wrong about that statement.

entropy
July 3, 2005, 12:22 AM
The 9mm has been around a lot longer than 1935. Try 1908, when it was developed for the P08 Luger.

.50 BMG as a rifle round.

.32 H&R Mag. has seen a resurgance due to Cowboy Action Shooting.

The Rabbi
July 3, 2005, 12:25 AM
I'd be more interested in seeing which pistol cartridges were declared the latest and greatest only to die in the next 18 months.

I would tend to agree the .40S&W probably has experienced more longevity than most would have believed possible.

EVIL5LITER
July 3, 2005, 12:33 AM
.357sig? 10mm? Both of those were supposed to be great hits, only to be met with mediocre success.

For the outline of this discussion, I think we need to only include calibers that were never really popular, not ones that lost popularity due to newer offerings (an example would be the other lever gun offerings that you never see anymore, such as the .35 remington and others).

entropy
July 3, 2005, 12:59 AM
Um, the .35 Remington was introduced in the Remington Model 14 pump , then the Model 8 semi-auto; Stevens chambered it in a bolt, T/C in the Contender, but I don't recall it ever chambered in a lever; the rimless design precluded it until the BLR, (or the reintro of the Win. M95), although the Marlin 336 could be chambered in it. Perhaps it was during early production.

EVIL5LITER
July 3, 2005, 01:04 AM
I went back and checked, and that's the name I come up with for the lever gun ammo.

entropy
July 3, 2005, 01:41 AM
BTW, Remington still produces .35 Remington for all those Model 14's, 141's, 8's and 81's that still hit the woods every fall. It was a very popular deer hunting round from the 30's until about the 80's. Which lever gun was produced in .35 Rem? The only one I can possibly think of would be the Marlin 336. What reference did you check?

Now, .25-20, that's one that was popular long ago, but virtually impossible to find rounds for today.

.38-40, .40-65, etc. are more in line with what you're thinking, which is the exact opposite of Matthew Vanitas' original question, BTW. He asked "what now popular guns/cartridges were labeled 'flash in the pan' when new.
The .35 Remington in no way fits that criteria, as the guns ( Mod. 14 and Mod. 8 ) were very popular when introduced, especially in .35 Rem. The .32 Rem. was dropped fairly quickly, while the .30 Rem. held out for a while.

Texian Pistolero
July 3, 2005, 07:48 AM
To change the question, I think that the .41 Magnum, still sputtering along, deserved a much bigger following.

c_yeager
July 3, 2005, 08:55 AM
Im going to hazard a guess and answere: ALL OF THEM.

Seriously, if you go through the writings of reviewers and enthusiasts there arent many cases when a new cartridge is praised for filling a needed niche. Gun owners have always been a cantankerous lot who prefer the way things were to the way things are.

Im sure there were plenty of people that thought the metalic cartridge was a passing fad.

epijunkie67
July 3, 2005, 08:59 AM
entropy
Um, the .35 Remington was introduced in the Remington Model 14 pump , then the Model 8 semi-auto; Stevens chambered it in a bolt, T/C in the Contender, but I don't recall it ever chambered in a lever

Dude, I've got a lever action in 35 remington at home right now. Yes, it's a Marlin 336. One of the best shooting guns I own.

HighVelocity
July 3, 2005, 09:00 AM
DAO Autos.

DorGunR
July 3, 2005, 11:11 AM
Entropy posted: The 9mm has been around a lot longer than 1935. Try 1908, when it was developed for the P08 Luger.

Sir, my post was in reply to CajunBass . He posted: The only ones I ever heard of were "German Lugers", and P-38's. S&W had the Model 39, but that was about it, at least that I knew of.

How about reading ALL the posts in a thread before going off half cocked.

Gewehr98
July 3, 2005, 01:04 PM
6.5-.284 is one of the top long range rounds right now, hence why you're totally wrong about that statement.

The 6.5-284 is a wildcat based on the .284 Winchester, and wasn't marketed by Remchester as a replacement for the larger belted magnums under the term "Short Magnum". Nor do I consider my own 1000-yard 6.5-284 as a short magnum. But thanks for telling me I'm totally wrong. By your logic the .22-250 is a short magnum compared to the .220 Swift, as is the .308 Winchester compared to the .30-06. :scrutiny:

entropy
July 3, 2005, 02:38 PM
How about reading ALL the posts in a thread before going off half cocked.

:o Guilty as charged.

I'll revise the statement: The P08 has been around in 9mm since 1908.

No offense intended. :)

I have since researched, and the Marlin 336 was indeed made in .35 Rem. It, however was never considered a 'lever gun' round like the .30-30, due to the fact that it was introduced and also much more popular in the Remington pump and semi-auto rifles. In whichever action, it still is a good round for deer and bear.

Texas Moon
July 3, 2005, 02:45 PM
Anyone remember the 9mm Federal?
It was a rimmed 9mm para for revolver usage. Lasted about 47 seconds in the early eighties.
Wasn't there something called a .356 S&W?
.401 Herter's Power mag?
The .32 H&R Magnum. It was mildly popular in the early eighties, almost died, and then the Cowboy Action folks discovered it and now is doing fine.

carebear
July 3, 2005, 02:58 PM
To expand on the "9mm" issue. I think CajunBass's point wasn't the cartridge in particular but rather its perceived explosion in the '80's when all the rage was DA hi-caps for police. (Smith 59, Glock 17, Beretta 92, all the double stacks)

That's when enough "modern" platforms started coming out domestically that a bandwagon of "gotta have what the cops have" developed.

And of course all the old warhorses and traditionalists decried the little round in it's new packaging ("crunchenticker anyone? ;) ) and predicted its imminent demise.

So, in that case, it was the round AND platform that was predicted to fail, not worldwide, but domestically.

HankB
July 3, 2005, 04:31 PM
When the 5.56 (.223) was introduced by the military, quite a few people - used to thinking of the .30/06 and 7.62 NATO (.308) as warfighting cartridges - thought this little pipsqueak would simply fade away.

That didn't really turn out to be the case . . .

1 old 0311
July 3, 2005, 04:37 PM
Hey guys. I am still waiting for the .41 Action Express to come back :) :)

Kevin

EVIL5LITER
July 4, 2005, 01:30 AM
BTW, Remington still produces .35 Remington for all those Model 14's, 141's, 8's and 81's that still hit the woods every fall. It was a very popular deer hunting round from the 30's until about the 80's. Which lever gun was produced in .35 Rem? The only one I can possibly think of would be the Marlin 336. What reference did you check?

Now, .25-20, that's one that was popular long ago, but virtually impossible to find rounds for today.

.38-40, .40-65, etc. are more in line with what you're thinking, which is the exact opposite of Matthew Vanitas' original question, BTW. He asked "what now popular guns/cartridges were labeled 'flash in the pan' when new.
The .35 Remington in no way fits that criteria, as the guns ( Mod. 14 and Mod. 8 ) were very popular when introduced, especially in .35 Rem. The .32 Rem. was dropped fairly quickly, while the .30 Rem. held out for a while

Read, please, read carefully.

I was saying we need to make sure we are talking about calibers that were supposed to be big that never made it (i.e. 10mm), and NOT calibers that were popular at one time but have since been replaced by more popular calibers (like .35 remington, or .30-40 Krag, as another example. Both were popular in their day, but they are not now).

PLEASE read what I type before you answer.

PaladinVC
July 4, 2005, 02:55 AM
I've never read an account of somebody being delighted by the M-16. The tight rifling of the M-16, combined with the light, small-caliber round it fired, made it extremely unpopular with soldiers when it was introduced, not to mention the fact that it was plastic.

From what I've read, each incarnation of the weapon has been more reviled than the last. New cartridges with less impressive terminal ballistics, the removal of full auto from the M16-A2, and the gradual shift toward more target-range performance at the cost of combat effectiveness have been the topics of conversation and review whenever I hear or read about the weapon system.

And yet they persist to this very moment on the battlefields of the world.

Be advised, all of the above is hearsay.

If you enjoyed reading about "What now-popular Guns/cartridges were labeled "flash in the pan" when new?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!