FTWWTKM 4th of July quiz


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Brian Williams
July 4, 2005, 08:53 AM
THR is so well versed so quick quiz


When was the Declaration Of Independence signed?





If you quess it first you can have the label K.O.O.K.












































For Those Who Want To Know More

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1911 guy
July 4, 2005, 08:57 AM
on August second, 1776.

71Commander
July 4, 2005, 09:18 AM
1775

Brian Williams
July 4, 2005, 09:47 AM
That was quick Aug 2 is correct, but it did not begin on Aug 2, it began July 4 by one person. Then it was signed by all but one member who then signed in Nov.

1911 guy You can claim the title of Keeper Of Odd Knowledge.

Now who knows some more 4 Of july trivia.


Like; Who died on the 50th anniversary of the Declaration?

308win
July 4, 2005, 09:53 AM
July 19

stangboy555
July 4, 2005, 09:54 AM
Thomas Jefferson and John Adams both former Presidents, both died on July 4th 1826. Jefferson died a few hours earlier.

LaEscopeta
July 4, 2005, 10:11 AM
I believe the Continental Congress voted unanimously on 4 Jul 1776 to adopt the Declaration of Independence, and the President of the Congress (John Hancock) signed it on the same day. As stated above, most of the other members of the Congress signed it on 2 August 1776.

John Adams promoted the fourth of the July as Independence day, and said it should be celebrated with picnics, races, and fireworks.

Like; Who died on the 50th anniversary of the Declaration?

Both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

Gotta go start getting our picnic ready; everybody have a happy fourth.

1911 guy
July 4, 2005, 11:58 AM
My wife has said this for a while now...
Interestingly enough, both men thought the other was still alive and commented to the "fact" before dying.

Old NFO
July 4, 2005, 03:12 PM
I believe the Continental Congress voted unanimously on 4 Jul 1776 to adopt the Declaration of Independence, and the President of the Congress (John Hancock) signed it on the same day. As stated above, most of the other members of the Congress signed it on 2 August 1776.

LaEscopeta, it was voted on 4 Jul, but not approved by all 13 colonies until 9 July. On July 19th Congress ordered that an official copy of the document be created, it was embossed and finished 2 August, which is the actual signing day and that was the day John Hancock signed it as the first signer. Not all the participants ever signed the Declaration.

LaEscopeta
July 4, 2005, 07:36 PM
On July 19th Congress ordered that an official copy of the document be created, it was embossed and finished 2 August, which is the actual signing day and that was the day John Hancock signed it as the first signer.
I stand corrected. Im standing that way more and more now-a-days. They say the memory is the second thing to go when you get old; I do not remember what the first thing is.

itgoesboom
July 4, 2005, 08:09 PM
Couple intresting things:

Five men were chosen to draft a declaration to be held incase the Continental Congress chose to vote for it. John Adams, Ben Franklin, Robert Livingston and Roger Sherman were chosen. All four were from either New York, Conn., or Mass., all northerners.

So the committe decided they needed someone from the South.

The fifth member won his place through compromise; some Northern delegates continued to believe that naming a Virginian to America's most visible positions was a good strategy.


That's how Jefferson got to be one of the five chosen to write it.

When it came time to write the Declaration, and one man was needed to write the first draft, Thomas Jefferson told John Adams that Adams should write it. When he refused, and Jefferson questioned him, Adams responded:

Reason first, you are a Virginian, and a Virginian ought to appear at the head of this business. Reason second, I am obnoxoious, suspected and unpopular.....

So thats why Jefferson wrote it.

Congress actually voted on July 2nd to become independant.

On July 2nd, 1776, with no dissenting votes, the Congress at Philadelphia voted that the American colonies were henceforth free and independent states.

John Adams actually thought that Independance Day would be Celebrated on July 2nd.

The next evening he wrote home in triumph to Abigail Adams that the second day of July 1776 would "be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival......It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance by acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more."

It wasn't until July 4th the wording of the declaration of the independance was agreed upon.

Just more fun information for everyone.

I.G.B.

Selfdfenz
July 4, 2005, 10:03 PM
it was voted on 4 Jul, but not approved by all 13 colonies until 9 July.

Still not bad considering all they had back then was dial-ups.
:D
Happy and safe 4th one and all.

S-

CentralTexas
July 4, 2005, 10:08 PM
His name WASN'T George Washington....
CT

TimH
July 5, 2005, 07:15 AM
The next evening he wrote home in triumph to Abigail Adams that the second day of July 1776 would "be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival......It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance by acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more."

Thats a great quote

GT
July 5, 2005, 09:15 AM
John Hanson

But that was pre-Constitution. And he was a big anti-federalist.


G

itgoesboom
July 5, 2005, 04:35 PM
John Hanson

But that was pre-Constitution. And he was a big anti-federalist.


Nope. Close, but not quite. John Hanson was the 3rd.

Samuel Huntington was the First President of the US.

From johnhanson.net

It is important to note here that John Hanson was NOT the 1st President of the United states of America under the Articles of Confederation. This claim is a MYTH created by Seymour Wemyss Smith writing a book called John Hanson - Our First President in 1932. Samuel Huntington was installed as the 1st President of the United States on March 2, 1781 an official ceremony in Philadelphia. This 1st U.S. Constitution, the Articles of Confederation, was unanimously ratified by all 13 States on March 1, 1781 creating "The Perpetual Union of the United States of America." At that moment the Continental Congress ceased to exist and the United States of America in Congress Assembled assumed all federal power under the new U.S. Constitution.

I.G.B.

Old NFO
July 5, 2005, 05:15 PM
They say the memory is the second thing to go when you get old; I do not remember what the first this is.

Don't feel bad LaEscopeta, I have the same problem... now what were we talking about??? :D

Thanks It goes boom, I couldn't remember Samuel's last name- There is "one" train of thought that it's where Uncle Sam comes from...

Hope everyone had a safe and happy 4th! The fireworks at the Mall were great, but the traffic was "ridiculous" (so I don't offend Art's Grammaw). :evil:

itgoesboom
July 5, 2005, 07:08 PM
LaEscopeta, it was voted on 4 Jul, but not approved by all 13 colonies until 9 July. On July 19th Congress ordered that an official copy of the document be created, it was embossed and finished 2 August, which is the actual signing day and that was the day John Hancock signed it as the first signer. Not all the participants ever signed the Declaration.

OldNFO,

I haven't seen any info regarding it not being approved until July 9th.

According to ushistory.org's timeline:


June 7 Congress, meeting in Philadelphia, receives Richard Henry Lee's resolution urging Congress to declare independence.

June 11 Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston appointed to a committee to draft a declaration of independence. American army retreats to Lake Champlain from Canada.

June 12-27 Jefferson, at the request of the committee, drafts a declaration, of which only a fragment exists. Jefferson's clean, or "fair" copy, the "original Rough draught," is reviewed by the committee. Both documents are in the manuscript collections of the Library of Congress.

June 28 A fair copy of the committee draft of the Declaration of Independence is read in Congress.

July 1-4 Congress debates and revises the Declaration of Independence.

July 2 Congress declares independence as the British fleet and army arrive at New York.

July 4 Congress adopts the Declaration of Independence in the morning of a bright, sunny, but cool Philadelphia day. John Dunlap prints the Declaration of Independence. These prints are now called "Dunlap Broadsides." Twenty-four copies are known to exist, two of which are in the Library of Congress. One of these was Washington's personal copy.

July 5 John Hancock, president of the Continental Congress, dispatches the first of Dunlap's broadsides of the Declaration of Independence to the legislatures of New Jersey and Delaware.

July 6 Pennsylvania Evening Post of July 6 prints the first newspaper rendition of the Declaration of Independence.

July 8 The first public reading of the Declaration is in Philadelphia.

July 9 Washington orders that the Declaration of Independence be read before the American army in New York

July 19 Congress orders the Declaration of Independence engrossed (officially inscribed) and signed by members.

August 2 Delegates begin to sign engrossed copy of the Declaration of Independence. A large British reinforcement arrives at New York after being repelled at Charleston, S.C.

Azrael256
July 5, 2005, 07:15 PM
Actually, if we want to get technical (and I do sooooo love getting technical), the signing wasn't finished until 1781 when Thomas McKean of Delaware signed it.

Old NFO
July 5, 2005, 07:29 PM
I haven't seen any info regarding it not being approved until July 9th.

Itgoesboom, here is the link to the GPO site. and yes Azeral256, you are correct :D

http://bensguide.gpo.gov/6-8/documents/declaration/signers.html

itgoesboom
July 5, 2005, 08:00 PM
Old NFO,

Ahhhh....learn something new everyday I guess. What colony didn't approve it until the 9th?

Atleast I got the first president right.

I.G.B.

itgoesboom
July 5, 2005, 08:10 PM
Central Texas, So what do I win for getting your question right?


BTW, Anyone wishing to know all the Presidents prior to George Washington, here is the list.

Presidents of Continental Congress prior to articles of confederation
Peyton Randolph (September 5, 1774 October 21, 1774)
Henry Middleton (October 22, 1774 October 26, 1774)
Peyton Randolph (again) (May 10, 1775 May 23, 1775)
John Hancock (May 24, 1775 October 31, 1777)
Henry Laurens (November 1, 1777 December 9, 1778)
John Jay (December 10, 1778 September 27, 1779)
Samuel Huntington (September 28, 1779 March 1, 1781)

Presidents of the United States in Congress Assembled:

Samuel Huntington (March 1, 1781 July 9, 1781)
Thomas McKean (July 10, 1781 November 4, 1781)
John Hanson (November 5, 1781 November 3, 1782)
Elias Boudinot (November 4, 1782 November 2, 1783)
Thomas Mifflin (November 3, 1783 October 31, 1784)
Richard Henry Lee (November 30, 1784 November 6, 1785)
John Hancock (November 23, 1785 May 29, 1786)
Nathaniel Gorham (June 6, 1786 November 5, 1786)
Arthur St. Clair (February 2, 1787 November 4, 1787)
Cyrus Griffin (January 22, 1788 November 2, 1788)

I.G.B.

Brian Williams
July 5, 2005, 08:14 PM
You win the Title of KOOK of the First Order

Keeper
Of
Odd
Knowledge

itgoesboom
July 5, 2005, 09:00 PM
You win the Title of KOOK of the First Order

Keeper
Of
Odd
Knowledge


Sweeeeeeeeet!!! :D

I.G.B.

Old NFO
July 5, 2005, 11:08 PM
Ahhhh....learn something new everyday I guess. What colony didn't approve it until the 9th?

I dunno IGB, I'm still researching that one :confused: I'm on the road, AND on dialup, so I'm not getting to a lot of sites before I timeout. When I get the answer, I'll post it though. I never cease to be amazed at the variety of folks we have on here, AND their cumulative knowledge :cool:

GT
July 7, 2005, 06:48 PM
Nope. Close, but not quite. John Hanson was the 3rd.

Samuel Huntington was the First President of the US.


Man... I can't win anything.

G

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