Terminal Ballistics of .223 Ammo (with pics)


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Bartholomew Roberts
July 9, 2005, 11:26 AM
(Pics from CavReconScout's post on the AR15.com archive server)

These pics depict the Federal line of .223 ammo and its performance on ballistic gel after pasing through glass, steel, wallboard, heavy clothing, and bare gel respectively.

I thought they were informative enough to be worth sharing (note for example that a 40gr .223 barely penetrates 1.5" in gel after passing through glass). I also thought it was interesting that their American Eagle FMJ line penetrated 14" after passing through steel; but only 3.5" after passing through auto glass.

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MAUSER88
July 10, 2005, 10:54 AM
Thanks, that was kind of eye opening.

Joejojoba111
July 10, 2005, 02:15 PM
FMJ and BSP are impressive, but what does BSP mean?

308win
July 10, 2005, 02:52 PM
I wonder if heavy clothing approximates the resistance of a coyote or groundhog hide?

JohnKSa
July 10, 2005, 04:11 PM
So, now everyone who reads this thread will realize what I have known for some time. People who say that the .223 is a poor choice for home defense due to overpenetration have no idea what penetration figures for the .223 actually look like.

JShirley
July 10, 2005, 04:46 PM
Yup. I think, except (perhaps) for blast, a .308 w/ the right ammo will work just fine, too...

Gun Wielding Maniac
July 10, 2005, 05:46 PM
Hmmm... I think it is important not to get Federal .223 loads mixed up with M193 ball or M855 ball performance. The generalization that .223 will not "overpenetrate" is bound to get someone in trouble. Also, bare in mind the differance in building materials in interior walls... as well as the differance between auto glass and plaster.

JohnKSa
July 10, 2005, 07:26 PM
Any "generalization" will get a person into trouble. What I'm saying is that if you look at typical penetration numbers for common pistol SD rounds and then look at penetration numbers for common .223 commercial rounds, the .223 SD numbers are in the same range and usually on the low end of the range.

I wasn't really talking about going through barriers, was pointing out the penetration numbers in bare gel. But if you look at the numbers, it would seem that typical .223 SD rounds are even less effective at going through barriers than common pistol SD rounds.

Cesiumsponge
July 10, 2005, 07:40 PM
Thanks for posting that insightful information. ARFcom has good stuff, if you can wade through a lot of the muck.
People who say that the .223 is a poor choice for home defense due to overpenetration have no idea what penetration figures for the .223 actually look like.

Likewise on several occasions I made a direct comparison of pistol and .223 rifle penetration based on results at the informal Box Of Truth website. The trend clearly shows that properly selected .223/5.56mm (ie frangible, hp, not M855 or M193) will penetrate less or on equal footing to traditional pistol munitions on generic walls. Many people are still under the stereotype that all rifles suffer from severe overpenetration to a greater degree than pistols. Perhaps in the case of FMJ ammo, but not all of it.

GunGoBoom
July 10, 2005, 09:33 PM
what does BSP mean? +1 The tactical BSPs look good whatever they are.

nipprdog
July 10, 2005, 09:52 PM
what does BSP mean? +1

boattail soft point. I think. ;)

Blackhawk 6
July 10, 2005, 10:02 PM
what does BSP mean? +1
Bonded Soft-Point

heypete
July 10, 2005, 10:26 PM
I'm impressed that even the el-cheapo American Eagle stuff seems to have very good performance, considering the low cost compared to the "tactical" stuff.

I would definitely be curious to see how XM193 and XM855 handle in the same media. I have XM193 in magazines here in case I need it...but the pistol and shotgun are the go-to guns.

Joejojoba111
July 10, 2005, 10:48 PM
Is bonding where they glue the jacket on? Thx for answer btw. Also, I don't see any copper on the bsps?

Oh, also the blue stuff is a temporary cavity? How do they make it blue? Exposre to air or something? I expected a proportionally larger permanent cavity from one of those fragmenting rounds.

Bartholomew Roberts
July 11, 2005, 10:43 AM
As Blackhawk 6 already noted, the BSP stands for "Bonded Soft Point" in Federal literature. Federal uses the Trophy Bonded Bear Claw bullet for their tactical line, though the same bullet is available in 55gr only through their premium hunting bullet line.

In a bonded bullet, the core and jacket of a bullet are bonded together to resist the tendency of the bullet to shed its jacket on tough barriers like glass. They have used a dye to make the cavity in the gel more visible for marketing purposes.

I found the pictures pretty interesting. While I've always known that auto glass is hard on bullets, I'd have never guessed it provided better cover than the sheet of steel used in the FBI tests.

Rebar
July 11, 2005, 10:51 AM
I think the "box o truth" has a lot to say:
http://www.theboxotruth.com/contents.htm

21H40
July 11, 2005, 11:00 AM
Anyone got pics of M193 or M855 rounds?

I don't exactly get a choice of what I carry, but it works reliably in my old A2. Somehow looking at those pictures, I feel more like the kid with the dorky lunchbox on the first day of school. Man, I wish we could use some of those rounds...

VaughnT
July 11, 2005, 11:40 AM
That was exactly what I have been looking for! Thanks much.

FYI, after talking with Jeff Gonzales during a CP1 class, I decided to try UMC 45g JHP ammo in my AR. It has a 16" bbl with a 1/7 twist. Jeff brought up that lightweight rounds are being used in-country to minimize penetration through walls, which might get a teammate in the next room killed, and are proving rather effective. In a home-defense scenario, I have very close ranges and people sleeping behind just a few inches of interior wall. As such, I had been looking at the frangible ammo, but can't afford it.

When Jeff mentioned using a light round, I bought a bulkpack of the UMC stuff and found it to be very accurate and easy to shoot rapidly. I might not have the long reach of a 60g round, but I can't see that far, anyhow.

I definitely like to see my position substantiated with this test. Thank you very much! :D

Sergeant Sabre
July 11, 2005, 01:21 PM
Anyone got pics of M193 or M855 rounds?


No pictures of M855 testing, but here is a drawing showing the typical wound profile:

http://www.firearmstactical.com/images/Wound%20Profiles/M855.jpg

More information at: http://www.firearmstactical.com/briefs13.htm (scroll down to the third article)

21H40
July 12, 2005, 02:11 PM
Thanks. I'm still hoping we can figure out how to legally switch to more effective ammo... until it's really ok for soldiers to kill enemies on purpose, I'll hold my breath.

Richard.Howe
July 13, 2005, 12:08 AM
Any guesses on how that T223D (40gr) would perform out of a 1:7 x 16" barrel at 100 meters? Colt's "new" old uber-tactical twist rate would spin the snot out of a 40 gr bullet -- but would it disentigrate the projectile?

Lucky
July 13, 2005, 12:53 AM
That's interesting. I've heard that too much spin over-stabilizes a bullet, delaying tumbling. But some gut hunch also suggests that it might have too much stress and fragment immediately on contact.

Cesiumsponge
July 13, 2005, 01:35 AM
Colt's "new" old uber-tactical twist rate would spin the snot out of a 40 gr bullet -- but would it disentigrate the projectile?

Ammo Oracle says they can throw their jackets off at those speeds. Didn't say its 100% or 0%, but just "can". Also I would fathom that the spinning bullet itself is also like a small flywheel, and flywheels can catastrophically fling themselves apart when the integrity is compromised.

http://www.ammo-oracle.com/body.htm#twists

Agrippa
July 13, 2005, 09:11 PM
Any guesses on how that T223D (40gr) would perform out of a 1:7 x 16" barrel at 100 meters? Colt's "new" old uber-tactical twist rate would spin the snot out of a 40 gr bullet -- but would it disentigrate the projectile?

The test rifle on those pages is a Colt M4, 14.5" 1x7 twist. I would guess it must be like shooting heavy 5.56 in a 1x9 twist, some like it, some don't.

Bartholomew Roberts
June 27, 2006, 07:48 PM
Nosler 77gr OTM and Hornady 75gr OTM data:
http://www.btammolabs.com/tests/5.htm

More Nosler 77gr OTM data:
http://www.btammolabs.com/tests/6.htm

See this thread for general discussion on this issue by experts in the field (includes gel shot of Sierra 77gr):
http://www.ar15.com/content/page.html?id=185

Newton
June 28, 2006, 01:50 PM
That 55 grain Tactical BSP load looks like a great performer.

That'd be my choice.

Dr.Rob
July 1, 2006, 11:32 PM
Interesting thing to me was the overall performance of the lowly 55gr fmj... still a pretty good bullet. and the woeful performance of most of the rounds against glass.

Neat info.

JohnKSa
July 1, 2006, 11:59 PM
Glass and other hard, shattering substances are very hard to defeat. They do a lot of damage to the bullet, and absorb a lot of energy when they break.

I seem to recall some years back that some company was offering body armor based on this principle. It used a "ceramic matrix". It was supposed to defeat most rifle rounds without requiring trauma plates.

Snake Eyes
July 2, 2006, 12:13 AM
Thanks a lot.....Why couldn't y'all have posted this BEFORE I went and spent all that money on the Hornady TAP Balistic Tip ammo???

Darn those plastic tipped bullets suck HARD!

blackhawk2000
July 2, 2006, 06:10 PM
Excellent post!

Any info on the Black Hills 77g HP?

Bartholomew Roberts
July 2, 2006, 06:21 PM
Black Hills loads the Sierra 77gr MatchKing... if you go to the AR15.com link from the previous page, you'll see a picture of that bullet in gel. Very long neck before fragmentation; but otherwise a top performer.

larryw
July 2, 2006, 06:24 PM
I find it interesting the 40gr HP performs signifcantly better shooting through heavy clothing than bare gel. Figuring out why that is doesn''t take a lot of thought, but interesting results none-the-less.

Newton
July 3, 2006, 11:56 AM
Is there anywhere we can purchase Federal's Tactical ammo.

If the 55gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claw uses the exact same bullet as the 55gr Tactical load, are the 2 cartridges essentially identical ? Could be the easy option to get that 55gr Tactical BSP by another name.

Bartholomew Roberts
July 3, 2006, 12:37 PM
I haven't seen the 55gr Federal Tactical TBBC load; but the hunting bullet uses nickel cases and has a cannelure to prevent setback in autoloaders as well as using the same 55gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claw bullet. I imagine that performance would be very close if not identical to the Tactical load.

One thing to remember though is that the bonded soft point (TBBC) bullets are very good penetrators. The TBBC will penetrate intermediate barriers better than the M855 with steel penetrator. All that stuff about .223 presenting less of a threat of overpenetration does not apply to these rounds.

army_eod
July 3, 2006, 04:36 PM
WOW

I want me some o' those LE223T3 62 grainers. Where can I buy???

Why..right here

http://www.streichers.com/ProductDetail.aspx?Catalog=Guns%20and%20Ammo&Category=AMMO_TACT&Prod=FC-223LET

147 Grain
August 1, 2006, 02:46 PM
The following data was compiled from Federal's Tactical 223 Rifle Data Book (http://le.atk.com/223data/223rifle.asp?pgtocall=1) using standard wound ballistic testing procedures located HERE (http://www.le.atk.com/). Rifle used was Colt M4, with 14.5" barrel, 1 in 7 twist, and fired into test media 10 yards away.


Bare Gelatin

Federal LE223T3 (62-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 16.0"
Federal LE223T1 (55-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 14.75"
Federal AE223 (American Eagle 55-gr. FMJ) = 14.5"
Federal T223L (TRU 64-gr. SP) = 12.0"
Federal T223F (TRU 55-gr. Nosler Ballistic Tip) = 11.50"
Federal T223E (TRU 55-gr. Sierra Match King BTHP) = 11.25"
Federal T223A (TRU 55-gr. SP) = 7.75"
Federal T223D (TRU 40-gr. HP) = 5.75"


Heavy Clothing - 4 Layers

Federal LE223T3 (62-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 17.0"
Federal LE223T1 (55-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 15.5"
Federal T223L (TRU 64-gr. SP) = 12.25"
Federal AE223 (American Eagle 55-gr. FMJ) = 12.25"
Federal T223F (TRU 55-gr. Nosler Ballistic Tip) = 12.0"
Federal T223A (TRU 55-gr. SP) = 11.50"
Federal T223E (TRU 55-gr. Sierra Match King BTHP) = 11.0"
Federal T223D (TRU 40-gr. HP) = 9.0"


Steel - 2 Pieces of 20 Gauge

Federal AE223 (American Eagle 55-gr. FMJ) = 16.0"
Federal LE223T3 (62-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 14.25"
Federal T223L (TRU 64-gr. SP) = 11.25"
Federal LE223T1 (55-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 10.75"
Federal T223A (TRU 55-gr. SP) = 9.5"
Federal T223F (TRU 55-gr. Nosler Ballistic Tip) = 9.0"
Federal T223E (TRU 55-gr. Sierra Match King BTHP) = 9.0"
Federal T223D (TRU 40-gr. HP) = 6.25"


Wallboard - 2 Pieces of 1/2" Sheetrock

Federal LE223T3 (62-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 17.75"
Federal LE223T1 (55-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 14.0"
Federal T223E (TRU 55-gr. Sierra Match King BTHP) = 12.5"
Federal T223L (TRU 64-gr. SP) = 12.25"
Federal AE223 (American Eagle 55-gr. FMJ) = 11.25"
Federal T223F (TRU 55-gr. Nosler Ballistic Tip) = 8.5"
Federal T223A (TRU 55-gr. SP) = 7.25"
Federal T223D (TRU 40-gr. HP) = 7.25"


Plywood - 3/4"

Federal LE223T3 (62-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 17.5"
Federal LE223T1 (55-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 15.0"
Federal T223F (TRU 55-gr. Nosler Ballistic Tip) = 13.75"
Federal T223L (TRU 64-gr. SP) = 12.25"
Federal T223E (TRU 55-gr. Sierra Match King BTHP) = 11.25"
Federal T223A (TRU 55-gr. SP) = 10.5"
Federal AE223 (American Eagle 55-gr. FMJ) = 10.0"
Federal T223D (TRU 40-gr. HP) = 6.5"


Auto Glass - Laminated Glass is Offset at 40* Horizontal Angle & Weapon is Offset 15*

Federal LE223T3 (62-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 13.5"
Federal LE223T1 (55-gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) = 11.5"
Federal T223F (TRU 55-gr. Nosler Ballistic Tip) = 8.25"
Federal T223L (TRU 64-gr. SP) = 6.5"
Federal T223E (TRU 55-gr. Sierra Match King BTHP) = 6.25"
Federal AE223 (American Eagle 55-gr. FMJ) = 3.25"
Federal T223A (TRU 55-gr. SP) = 2.25"
Federal T223D (TRU 40-gr. HP) = 1.5"

Source:Federal's Tactical 223 Rifle Data Book (http://le.atk.com/223data/223rifle.asp?pgtocall=1)

Bartholomew Roberts
August 1, 2006, 03:30 PM
Hornady TAP 75gr data (Bushmaster 16" 1:9)
Original Source (http://www.policeone.com/police-products/firearms/accessories/ammunition/articles/126691/)

Bare gel
Muzzle velocity: 2,665fps Penetration: 13.5" Max Temp. Cavity: 6.5" Depth to max cavity: 4.5"
Car door
Muzzle velocity: 2,682fps Penetration: 12.0" Max Temp. Cavity: 6.0" Depth to max cavity: 3.25"
Fire Door
Muzzle velocity: 2,695fps Penetration: 8.75" Max Temp. Cavity: 5.5" Depth to max cavity: 2.25"
Safety glass
Muzzle velocity: 2,711fps Penetration: 6.5" Max Temp. Cavity: 4.5" Depth to max cavity: 3"
Wallboard
Muzzle velocity: 2,688fps Penetration: 6" Max Temp. Cavity: 6.25" Depth to max cavity: 3.25"

army_eod
August 1, 2006, 06:22 PM
I picked up the TRU 64 grainers. They are cost effective, so to speak.

Bartholomew Roberts
August 19, 2007, 08:00 PM
Ballistics gel testing of 40gr, 55gr and 75gr Hornady TAP offerings from a 16" 1/9 barrel.

These images are from the article "Terminal Ballistics; A Critical Consideration" by M.L. McPherson published in the December 1998 issue of Tactical Shooter (out of print) and were scanned and shared by Molon of AR15.com - Thanks.

DMK
August 19, 2007, 09:03 PM
Definitely shows why light .223 loads suck as self defense rounds.

lamazza
August 19, 2007, 09:25 PM
It looks like 55gr FMJ is sufficient in every test, but these tests were done at 10yards!

glockman19
August 19, 2007, 09:40 PM
Great thread.

Thanks

jpwilly
August 19, 2007, 10:19 PM
Great info...wonder how the Wolf 55gr FMJ's would do. I have a few ammo cans full of that stuff.

springmom
August 19, 2007, 10:37 PM
I can't read the pics. Can you give a link to the original? On my computer it ends up as illegible chicken scratch :(

Springmom

Bartholomew Roberts
August 19, 2007, 11:30 PM
Great info...wonder how the Wolf 55gr FMJ's would do. I have a few ammo cans full of that stuff.

They hit and yaw at a random distance. When they yaw, the hole goes from 5.56mm to 45mm as the bullet yaws and then the bullet travels base forward in a long curving trajectory. They don't really fragment at all, though they do squeeze a little bit of lead out of the bottom like toothpaste. See this archived thread (http://thehighroad.org/archive/index.php/t-149166.html) for more details. All in all, not a great defense choice.

I can't read the pics. Can you give a link to the original?

Those are the original pics. They are labeled from left to right: 40gr VMAX 16" 1-9, 55gr VMAX 16" 1-9, and 75gr BTHP 16" 1-9. A ruler is beneath each picture and the penetration depths are as follows:

40gr max depth: ~5.5"
Neck: <1"
Max cavity depth: ~2"

55gr max depth: ~8.25"
Neck: <1"
Max cavity depth: ~2"

75gr max depth: ~14"
Neck: 2"
Max cavity depth: ~5.5"

And if you have never seen it, The AR15.com Ammo Oracle (http://www.razoreye.net/mirror/ammo-oracle/AR15_com_Ammo_Oracle_Mirror.htm) is definitely worth a read for anyone interested in .223 ballistics and terminal performance.

SoCalShooter
August 19, 2007, 11:55 PM
Thats pretty cool thanks. It would seem that good home defense ammo would be 40gr loads.

Bartholomew Roberts
August 20, 2007, 12:15 AM
It would seem that good home defense ammo would be 40gr loads.

Well, the classic problem posed by home defense is that if you don't penetrate deeply enough to reach major blood-bearing organs or the central nervous system, you will not physiologically stop the attacker. The attacker may choose to break off the attack after being hit; but it will be at their option. If you don't want to rely on the psychological effects of being shot, you need to hit those major organs or CNS. The FBI has determined that the minimum ballistics gel penetration necessary to meet this in a variety of scenarios is 12". On the other hand, all of us are concerned about penetrating too deeply or what might happen if we miss... so the same penetration that makes the round effective can also be a liability.

5" sounds like plenty of penetration at first until you consider that this is just gelatin (no bones, clothing, etc.). So already we can see penetration might be more shallow than 5"... now start thinking about less than optimum profiles, or intervening structures/body parts. For example, picture someone facing you in either a Weaver or Isoceles stance wielding a handgun. If you shoot center mass, what is going to be right in the middle of your target zone? Both arms and a chunk of metal... if you have 5" of penetration max and strike an arm, you aren't going to have any effect on the torso (though the 40gr VMAX will make a mess out of that arm).

Further let's take a look at how that 40gr behaves - it expands immediately and violently (i.e. before it has penetrated inside the body to the major organs). On an average male, the heart sits about 2-3" deep in the chest (and behind the sternum). By 4", the 40gr is already past its maximum wound cavity and is nothing but tiny fragments that are shrinking down rapidly by 5". So if the sternum doesn't reduce your penetration AND if you have a nice unobstructed torso shot AND if you are accurate enough to place the smaller shrinking cavity of the 40gr on a major blood bearing organ that is less than 5" deep, you will probably get a stop. Change any one of those factors and you are now relying on how your attacker chooses to react to your defense instead of how his body forces him to react.

Here is a cross section of a human male torso showing the major organs and their depth in relation to the body. The torso is about 20" wide and 8" deep. The front (chest) is at the top of the picture.

SaMx
August 20, 2007, 01:32 AM
this is an interesting thread

thanks for the info

Ignition Override
February 15, 2008, 02:23 AM
Being new (last fall) to any kind of shooting other than casual .22 single-shot years ago, how about some basic questions about various .223 ammo sold by Wal-Mart etc?

I bought some .223 Remington (?) and noticed that a box of (20) 55-grain rounds only cost about $9, but the (20) 45-grain rounds cost about $12.
Are they different bullet jackets? Simply lead versus copper?

Yesterday I was able to test a used Ruger Mini-14 then an AK type of rifle at a store way north of here which allows you to test a used gun at the store's range, which is just behind the rear counter! That was quite fun and convenient.:)
The awkward part was getting used to wiggling the magazines into the guns. :oIt required much more practice than with a simple M-1 carbine.

Can't the ability to quickly load a fresh magazine into your gun affect your survivability in a critical defensive situation (i.e. riot or earthquake anarchy) just as much as the type of .223, 7.62, .308 etc ammo your are using, if the gun is new to you and is a bit difficult to change magazines?

I never see a debate about this. Just a fresh novice here trying to play catch-up on guns, especially military rifles, which always attract my attention (like a tall redhead...).
Reading y'all's opinions is always interesting and entertaining.

N1150X
June 15, 2008, 04:14 PM
I don't mean to cause a problem but I do not see any calibration data shown that would allow for an accurate representation of the rounds performance so I wouldn't base your decesion on what tactical round to use based solely on the terminal ballistics presented above

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
June 16, 2008, 12:49 AM
So just to clarify - ALL of those are various Federal factory loads? Pretty dad-gummed cool, though. I'd like to see other brands for comparison.

Bartholomew Roberts
June 16, 2008, 12:57 AM
I don't mean to cause a problem but I do not see any calibration data shown that would allow for an accurate representation of the rounds performance

The testing procedures and calibration data were originally published on Federal/ATK's LE website (see the link by 147 Grain) but are no longer available.

So just to clarify - ALL of those are various Federal factory loads?

Yes, the pictures in the original post all represent Federal factory loads. The subsequent links show other types of .223/5.56 ammo.

kelbro
October 18, 2009, 07:46 PM
Good info here.

Bartholomew Roberts
March 5, 2011, 11:37 AM
FBI Ballistics Gel Test Data for Black Hills 50gr TSX here:
http://lightfighter.net/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/7206084761/m/86520863663

Short version: good barrier blind performance that works in barrels from 8-20" and twists from 1:12 up.

Also see this thread for more .223 Drywall Penetration info:
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=566923&highlight=.223+drywall+penetration

shootr
March 6, 2011, 05:32 PM
Lot's of great info here, thanks to all who posted!

Ithaca37
March 6, 2011, 05:41 PM
I don't mean to cause a problem but I do not see any calibration data shown that would allow for an accurate representation of the rounds performance

The calibration bb is clearly visible in the pictures.

e.money83
October 20, 2011, 10:47 AM
how would these ballistics compare with the 14" .223rem t/c contender pistol barrel. does being a single shot barrel increase energy? does the -.5" barrel length decrease energy?

Bartholomew Roberts
October 20, 2011, 07:12 PM
how would these ballistics compare with the 14" .223rem t/c contender pistol barrel. does being a single shot barrel increase energy? does the -.5" barrel length decrease energy?

The best answer would be to chrony your Thompson Contender with the relevant load. As a rough guess, I would imagine you are going to be around 50-150fps slower than the figures given for a 16" barrel.

As a general rule, .223 is going to INCREASE penetration as it goes slower because it less likely to break up and fragment (with exceptions based on bullet design). This study by the New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice (http://www.state.nj.us/lps/dcj/njpdresources/pdfs/wallboard_test.pdf) covers barrels shorter than 14.5" as well as comparing penetration through typical home materials.

Bartholomew Roberts
December 30, 2011, 02:16 PM
Just adding this link to the AR15.com Ammo Oracle discussion of Best Choices for Self-Defense Ammo, which is a great resource for both .223 ammo and ammo in general:

http://ammo.ar15.com/project/Self_Defense_Ammo_FAQ/index.htm

Chris111
January 1, 2012, 12:39 PM
This is great info. I'm kind of surprised about the 55 gr and 62 gr soft point comparison. I think this also clears up some question about fmj as well.

303tom
January 1, 2012, 02:31 PM
Quote; I also thought it was interesting that their American Eagle FMJ line penetrated 14" after passing through steel; but only 3.5" after passing through auto glass.

Glass is harder than steel !

Busta Prima
January 1, 2012, 03:23 PM
This is mostly a guess . . . but where the steel presented a relatively simple, one ingredient, possibly brittle barrier . . . the glass presents several laminations specifically designed to yield and sacrifice themselves thereby absorbing a LOT of energy. How it's Made featured windshields once . . . it isn't just glass. There are plastic or polymer sheets between the laminations of specially formulated glass.

Sapper771
August 8, 2013, 10:30 AM
How it's Made featured windshields once . . . it isn't just glass. There are plastic or polymer sheets between the laminations of specially formulated glass.


That's correct. Windshield glass is what's known as Laminate glass. Two 1/8" pieces glued together by a flexible core. That's why it stays together when struck.

I know that three pieces of Laminate glass glued together to form a laminated panel will stop most service caliber pistol rounds from 9mm-45acp. I dont know about rifle rounds, still in the process of testing that out.

nipprdog
August 8, 2013, 12:48 PM
This thread was started in 2005. ;)

Sapper771
August 8, 2013, 01:09 PM
Yeah, just noticed that. Didn't mean to revive it. It showed up on my tapatalk as a current thread......I guess I fell for it.

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