(WI) Chippewa Falls firearms instructor shoots himself in the leg


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Drizzt
July 27, 2005, 01:55 AM
Chippewa Falls firearms instructor shoots himself in the leg
Tuesday July 26, 2005

CHIPPEWA FALLS, Wis. (AP) A firearms instructor and gun collector shot himself in the leg after he thought his new pistol was in the locked position.

Martin Brill, 55, of Chippewa Falls, was treated at St. Joseph's Hospital Sunday for an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound to his thigh he suffered while practicing his ``quick draw'' technique.

According the Chippewa County sheriff's department, Brill was practicing on a private range in the town of Tilden. He was using a .22-caliber revolver made in Germany.

Brill said he did not lock the hammer fully, which allowed it to spring forward, activate the firing pin and discharge the firearm.

The gun was still pointed down, and the bullet went through the holster into his thigh, lodging just above the knee cap.

He said he practiced several times, but had recently bought this pistol and only used it about three times.

Brill, who said he has been a firearms instructor for 10 years and is an avid gun collector, laid down after shooting himself. After about 30 minutes he stood and drove himself to the hospital. He also cleaned up the area before he left.

http://wfrv.com/wisconsinap/WI-BRF--InstructorSho-kn/resources_news_html

Pretty considerate to go ahead and clean up the area before he left...

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KriegHund
July 27, 2005, 02:21 AM
Coulda just unloaded it forst...oh well, he learned a valuable lesson.

Khaotic
July 27, 2005, 08:32 AM
My first thought and knee-jerk response (appropriately strangled to allow coherent thought to occur) was "fire him"... but since coherent thought DID occur....

Likely he will take this lesson as both a life lesson, and a reminder of the seriousness of firearms safety, thus making him a better instructor in the future.

Stuff happens, chalk this one up to a learning experience - glad he wasn't hurt more severely.

-K

entropy
July 27, 2005, 01:03 PM
Practicing drawing with an RG? :scrutiny: Or does Korth make a .22 ? ;) Gotta give him credit for cleaning up the range before driving himself to the hospital, though. I'm sure his shooting buddies will give him heck for a long time. :p Glad it wasn't serious.

popplecop
July 27, 2005, 01:45 PM
I don't know what type of firearms instructor he was supposed to be, but I sure hope it wasn't Hunter Safety. If so, he sure needs a refresher course, heck he needs to retake the basic course 101. Just the type of press we need.

Standing Wolf
July 27, 2005, 07:02 PM
He was using a .22-caliber revolver made in Germany.

Sounds ominous to me.

Hardtarget
July 27, 2005, 07:11 PM
Live ammo is just not a good idea. There are plastic bullets powered by primer only that give good results on target at ten feet...and they teach a good, (painful), lesson re:poor form while avoiding that embarressing trip to the hospital. :D I know you guys knew this...I just had to say it!
Mark.

Andrew Rothman
July 27, 2005, 11:33 PM
Stuff happens, chalk this one up to a learning experience - glad he wasn't hurt more severely.

Ack! No! This didn't HAPPEN to him. He DID it to himself.

This was a NEGLIGENT discharge, a 100% preventable occurrance.

I hope his leg heals up soon so he can start kicking himself for being such an idiot.

Lucky
July 28, 2005, 11:11 AM
"Ack! No! This didn't HAPPEN to him. He DID it to himself.

This was a NEGLIGENT discharge, a 100% preventable occurrance.

I hope his leg heals up soon so he can start kicking himself for being such an idiot."

Think of it this way: There's 2 things he could have said, #1 I messed up, I didn't fully cock the hammer. OR #2 It's the gun, the gun went off,

Professional authorities use #2. It makes them look like asses. This guy used #1, and it doesn't look so bad because he didn't even finger the trigger. I think higher of anyone who admits they made a mistake than those who blame the gun.

And we've all had NDs. Mine was with an air pistol, and it was still pointed at the target, but it was still learned from.

Andrew Rothman
July 28, 2005, 11:41 AM
I think higher of anyone who admits they made a mistake than those who blame the gun.
My problem is not with the shooter -- he KNOWS he messed up. It's with statements like this:
Stuff happens, chalk this one up to a learning experience
...and this...
And we've all had NDs.
Not me. And I plan to keep it that way. All you have to do is follow the four rules.

Statements like "it happens to everyone" and "it's inevitable" are self-fulfilling prophesies.

It WON'T happen to me, `cause I won't let it, and it's 100% within my control!

torpid
July 28, 2005, 11:54 AM
And we've all had NDs.

No, we all haven't.



.

bill2
July 28, 2005, 12:38 PM
Does this guy work for the DEA?

richyoung
July 28, 2005, 03:56 PM
Sounds to me like he accidently "slip shot" a Sauer .22lr single-action clone - I can understand how it happened - they don't make snap caps for that calibur, and you can't 'dry fire" it for fear of breaking the firing pin or battering the chamber edge. Don't see how you can practice drawing and ACCURATELY engaging a target against time without using live ammo any way. If one followed the "four rules" STRICTLY, one could never dry-fire a weapon, clean a weapon, check trigger pull weight, practice realistically using your carry rig, etc. The rules are there to reduce the chance of accidents, but nothing will ever completely eliminate them.

Andrew Rothman
July 29, 2005, 12:44 PM
Sounds to me like he accidently "slip shot" a Sauer .22lr single-action clone

Sounds to me like he negligently "slip shot" a Sauer .22lr.

- I can understand how it happened - they don't make snap caps for that calibur, and you can't 'dry fire" it for fear of breaking the firing pin or battering the chamber edge.

I have, and use, .22 snap caps in my .22LR pistol. I got `em at GunStop (http://www.gunstop.com/) in Minnetonka, MN.

Don't see how you can practice drawing and ACCURATELY engaging a target against time without using live ammo any way. If one followed the "four rules" STRICTLY, one could never dry-fire a weapon,
Sure you can. Point it in a safe direction at something you're willing to destroy.
clean a weapon
Sure you can. Point it in a safe direction. Then take it apart. Once it's in pieces, it ain't a gun and you can point it wherever you wish.
, check trigger pull weight,
Sure you can. Point it in a safe direction at something you're willing to destroy.
practice realistically using your carry rig,
Sure you can. You unload the damn weapon and practice until you can draw without fumbling.
etc. The rules are there to reduce the chance of accidents, but nothing will ever completely eliminate them.

Accidents and negligence are not the same thing. This wasn't an accident -- it was negligence. You just don't fool around with quick draws with a loaded gun you're not completely familiar with.

He said he practiced several times, but had recently bought this pistol and only used it about three times.

richyoung
July 29, 2005, 02:38 PM
Sure you can. You unload the damn weapon and practice until you can draw without fumbling.


...and I'm sure he thought he could do it without fumbling - probably HAD done so. But no machine or man is 100% reliable, and until they BOTH are, such an incident can happen.

Taurus 66
July 29, 2005, 02:58 PM
Instructor: - "Okay people. Today I'm going to instruct you on the don'ts."

!!!BANG!!!

Instructor: - "Do Not do this! ... Any questions?" :D

Cesiumsponge
July 29, 2005, 03:28 PM
He also cleaned up the area before he left.

At least he was courteous and kept the range clean.

El Tejon
July 29, 2005, 04:35 PM
O.K. why was he "dry practicing" with a loaded gun? How is he an "instructor"? How many hours of training does he have and who made him an instructor? What kind of pistol fighting is he "instructing" with a .22? :confused:

Maybe it's time again to go over Tio Tejon's Rules for Dry Practice:

1. The Four Rules always apply.
2. Designate an area to dry practice.
3. Have no ammo in this area.
4. Have a backstop that will stop bullet from riccing around your basement.
5. Verbalize beginning and ending dry practice.
6. The Four Rules always apply.

If only more "instructors" read THR! :)

gezzer
July 29, 2005, 06:47 PM
FOTG

Finger outside Trigger Guard


He didn't :banghead:

Andrew Rothman
July 29, 2005, 07:17 PM
...and I'm sure he thought he could do it without fumbling - probably HAD done so. But no machine or man is 100% reliable, and until they BOTH are, such an incident can happen.

The machine didn't mess up - he did. And he used poor judgement in not realizing that he shouldn't, well, go off half-cocked when he barely knew the weapon.

He said he practiced several times, but had recently bought this pistol and only used it about three times.

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