chalk one up for the good guys & gals


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hawk0484
March 24, 2003, 06:37 PM
I live in the same county where this occurred. I'd like to shake her hand! Check out the article:

http://www.goupstate.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=SJ&Date=20030321&Category=NEWS&ArtNo=303210346&Ref=AR&Profile=1041&SectionCat=COMMUNITY11

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Waitone
March 24, 2003, 06:46 PM
I liked the part where she would have used a shotgun but she didn't want to tear up her new countertops. So she used a .357 mag instead.

joebogey
March 24, 2003, 06:51 PM
"I would have used a shotgun, but I had just had new countertops done and I didn't want to tear up the kitchen."
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------



ROTFLMAO
There is no way in this world, I would want to do anything to tee this lady off.
I wish they were all this way.


If you happen to meet her, congratulate her for me as well.

Greg L
March 24, 2003, 06:56 PM
She seems to have her priorities right. http://smilies.jeeptalk.org/contrib/geno/rofl.gif

Greg

Quartus
March 24, 2003, 06:59 PM
I guess that's the 5th Rule: Always watch out for the new countertops!

:D

keyhole
March 24, 2003, 07:09 PM
After all, a shotgun would have made replacing the door, instead of just patching a small hole! Way to go! Thinking ahead!

Navy joe
March 24, 2003, 07:10 PM
"I would have used a shotgun, but I had just had new countertops done and I didn't want to tear up the kitchen."

Minimizing backstop damage, choosing the right stain resistant carpet, and dining centerpieces that double as funeral arrangements. Read it all in the next issue of Martha Stewart's Tactical Living.

Wow, good shooting really. She even intuitively knew that the door would not stop the round, obviously some good training and common sense at work. I still sense a little common lack of knowledge in that she thought the SG would go everywhere, but she done good.

gudel
March 24, 2003, 07:16 PM
holy cow, good shot. good thing she's not in cali, otherwise the thief would sue her for personal injury. (that's why you always shoot to kill!)

Standing Wolf
March 24, 2003, 08:06 PM
"I would have used a shotgun, but I had just had new countertops done and I didn't want to tear up the kitchen."

Thanks, Ma'am! You've done yourself, your community, and the entire nation a favor.

Personally, I have cigarette butts in ash trays that are worth more than the life of an attempted burglar.

BogBabe
March 24, 2003, 08:52 PM
Unfortunately, she broke Rule #4 -- Know your target.

Fortunately, it was in fact a bad guy she shot.

I love the remark about her countertops. The notion that she was even thinking about that at a time like that is too funny!

M1911
March 24, 2003, 09:00 PM
Sounds like a tough old bird:D

LiquidTension
March 24, 2003, 09:00 PM
I live there :D

WhoKnowsWho
March 25, 2003, 01:02 AM
' "I was just praying to God. I knew he'd take care of me," she said.'

I think the .357 magnum worked a lot better than waiting for the hand of God to smite the perp...

gudel
March 25, 2003, 01:15 AM
I think the .357 magnum worked a lot better than waiting for the hand of God to smite the perp...

i was thinking the same thing.. maybe God helped to pull the trigger :D and missed the shot (no smiting necessary, he says)!

twoblink
March 25, 2003, 01:41 AM
Be sure of your target, and what new countertops are behind it! :D

She was PROTECTING HERSELF; something the government doesn't want you to do!

Double Maduro
March 25, 2003, 02:28 AM
Gotta go with BogBabe on this one. Could have been her grandkid or brother.


Fortunately it turned out ok this time.

Al Thompson
March 25, 2003, 02:15 PM
ARTICLE OPTIONS: E-mail this article | print this article

Posted on March 21, 2003
Woman shoots burglar in leg

:D
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


By Susan Orr
Staff Writer
susan.orr@shj.com

DUNCAN -- Margaret Summey credits God -- and her .357 Magnum -- with protecting her from a burglar Thursday.

Police say Summey, a 64-year-old widow, shot 43-year-old Timothy Doyle Huitt after he broke into her McGill Drive home. After being shot, Huitt fled through Summey's yard, leaving a trail of blood that led from her home to nearby Berry Shoals Road, where he collapsed.

"I did what I had to do. That's what the police told me. I protected myself," Summey said.

This is what happened, according to Summey's account and the Spartanburg County Sheriff's Office report:

Just before 1 p.m., someone rang Summey's doorbell but she didn't answer it. Then, she heard someone jiggling the back door. Then, someone was moving the trash can behind her house.

"I went straight and got the .357 Magnum," she said.

"I would have used a shotgun, but I had just had new countertops done and I didn't want to tear up the kitchen."

As it turns out, someone had moved the trash can under a bedroom window, used a brick to smash the glass and crawled through the window.

Armed with the gun, Summey went from the lower part of her house up some stairs and down a utility room hallway, where beyond a locked door was her kitchen. Through the gap under the door, Summey could see shadows indicating that someone was in the kitchen.

She waited until she saw a shadow, then shot through the door, hitting Huitt in the leg.

She then heard Huitt cry out, so she guessed she had shot him. Keeping the door closed, she then called 911 and told them what had happened.

Meanwhile, Huitt was running through Summey's yard in an effort to get to Brown's Bait and Tackle on Berry's Pond where his car was parked.

The shop's owner, Rhett Brown, said he didn't know anything had happened until a woman came in saying she was driving by and saw a man lying by the side of the road.

Brown said he went out of the store to see Huitt, whom he recognized because the man had come to his store just a few minutes earlier. Huitt had driven off then, but when Brown went outside he noticed Huitt's car was back in his parking lot.

When Brown went out to see Huitt by the side of the road, the man was in bad shape.

"He was a mess. He looked like he was hit by a car, the way he looked," Brown said.

Huitt was taken to Spartanburg Regional Medical Center, where he was in the intensive care unit Thursday evening.

A family member reached there would not comment.

The Spartanburg County Sheriff's Office has not charged Huitt in connection with the break-in, but charges are pending once he recovers, said Sheriff's Office spokesman Lt. Ron Gahagan.

No charges will be filed against Summey, Gahagan said, since she was defending herself on her property.

"What she did is within the allowable limits of the constitution of the state of South Carolina," he said.

"If you feel threatened and you are inside your house, you may defend yourself up to and including the use of deadly force."

Summey, who learned marksmanship from her first husband, a hunter, said her religious faith helped her remain calm during the break-in.

"I was just praying to God. I knew he'd take care of me," she said.

She usually watches after her great-granddaughter, but today the infant was not with her, for which Summey was thankful.

Hours after the shooting Summey remained calm and reaffirmed her belief that she'd done the right thing.

"There is some remorse in my heart, but I was facing death on the other side of a two-inch door," she said.

"I had to stop him."

Summey's twin brother, Edwin Johnson, said his sister has always been able to take care of herself.

"She was raised up with three brothers. Dadgum right she had to be tough," he said.

Huitt, of 243 Snow Mill Road in Woodruff, also faces charges in Cherokee County.

He was charged with strong-arm robbery in connection with an incident at Lindley's convenience store Thursday morning. The clerk there said Huitt threatened to harm her if she did not give him money.

Huitt has also faced similar charges in the past.

In 2002, Huitt was charged with armed robbery and strong-arm robbery in connection with two separate crimes.

larry_minn
March 25, 2003, 02:21 PM
I wouldn't praise her either. She did ok but did not cover all the bases. IF she would have yelled "who is there?..I've called the Police" then shot if he came thru door I would have cheered.
She did better then most and got lucky.

pax
March 25, 2003, 02:31 PM
Great story.

Already under discussion at http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?threadid=15198

I'll merge this in, since I see they posted only a link in that thread and it's good to have the story.

pax

I repeat myself when I'm under stress.
I repeat myself when I'm under stress.
I repeat myself when I'm under stress.
I repeat myself when I'm under stress.
I repeat myself when I'm under stress.

QKRTHNU
March 25, 2003, 02:34 PM
She waited until she saw a shadow, then shot through the door, hitting Huitt in the leg.
I'm glad she got the BG, but Rule IV still applies. She's lucky she didn't end up shooting someone she didn't really want to.

Alan Smithiee
March 25, 2003, 03:01 PM
I'm glad she's ok, but I can't call this a good shoot..... for all she knew it was a family member trying to get away from a burgler.. nope. not a technicaly good shoot

Khornet
March 25, 2003, 03:10 PM
what friend, child, or other family member pulls a trash can up to the window and throws a brick through it? Don't sound too ambiguous to me>

Coronach
March 25, 2003, 03:21 PM
It all doesn't sound ambiguous until some family member does it. The PoPo get called out all the time on people breaking into their own homes because they lost their keys. Or to check on their aged relatives who aren't answering their doorbells.

Rule IV always applies.

That said, she did pretty good.

Mike

CZ 75 BD
March 25, 2003, 03:35 PM
Good job Margaret!

jimbo
March 25, 2003, 03:57 PM
She is lucky she does not live in California. I don't think there is a jury alive that would believe she felt her life was in imminent danger, with the perp on the opposite side of a closed door. Not that I'm criticizing her, but I don't see how she can legally have been considered in fear for her life if the BG was on the opposite side of a closed door. Good thing there was no prosecution.

Waitone
March 25, 2003, 04:24 PM
Strange as it sounds there are states who combine the doctrine of No duty to Retreat in a domicile with a presumed danger. What that says is if the homeowner perceived a threat to life or llimb they are legally permitted to shoot through a closed door without verifying the threat. If however the door is open the homeowner must clearly establish the threat exists. In neither case does there exist a duty to retreat if one is in his domicile (home or hotel room).

When I was in CCH class I specifically questioned how the law could permit an act that was clearly in violation of the rules of safe gun handling. The response was, "We're talking about law, not logic."

280PLUS
March 25, 2003, 05:23 PM
at least she didn't tear the new kitchen up with the shotgun,,,

ROFLMAO !!

Double Maduro
March 25, 2003, 07:06 PM
Khornet,

The report said;

"As it turns out, someone had moved the trash can under a bedroom window, used a brick to smash the glass and crawled through the window."

Doesn't sound like she knew that at the time.

Could have been her brother (may have got kicked out of his house and needed a place to stay, or just checking on her), one of her kids, a neighbor, the police or anyone else checking on her wellfare.

Rule 4 always applies.

As do 1-3. That's why they are rules and not suggestions.

Just my humble, well maybe not so, opinion.

TexasVet
March 25, 2003, 10:35 PM
but I don't see how she can legally have been considered in fear for her life
-----------------------------------------------------
Many civilized states don't require you to be "in fear of your life" if you are in your own home. Naw, make that "Civilized" and just drop the many.

Blackhawk
March 31, 2003, 11:27 PM
'I would have used a shotgun, but I had just had
new countertops done and I didn't want to tear up the kitchen.'Outstanding! :neener:

Triad
March 31, 2003, 11:43 PM
Perhaps you should forget the rules of firearm safety and consider my new rule for entering a home that is not yours: Anytime you enter someone else's home without their permission you run the risk of being shot and/or prosecuted.

Double Maduro
April 1, 2003, 02:26 AM
Sorry Triad,

It is overly late when you have pulled the trigger and find out you have killed one of your loved ones. That is the reason for the rule.

I prefer to be sure of what I am going to destroy simply because I can't call the bullet back.

I also prefer to know that I am in danger before I pull the trigger.

The 4 rules are rules darnit. They don't say "all guns are always loaded, except--" "they say all guns are always loaded."

Number 4 says "be sure of your target and what lies beyond it."

Have a good day.

Triad
April 1, 2003, 07:41 PM
It is overly late when you have pulled the trigger and find out you have killed one of your loved ones. That is the reason for the rule.
Have you considered that she lives in her house and therefore knows exactly who belongs there and who doesn't? She knew that whoever was there shoudn't have been there, so she shot him.
I prefer to be sure of what I am going to destroy simply because I can't call the bullet back.
I agree totally. She was sure of what she was going to destroy. The intruder.
I also prefer to know that I am in danger before I pull the trigger.
This is a personal argument. I hope for your sake the proof you are in danger doesn't come in the form of a shotgun slug hitting you in the chest. It is my opinion that if you are in my house without my permission I am in danger. You do not feel the same which is fine.
The 4 rules are rules darnit. They don't say "all guns are always loaded, except--" "they say all guns are always loaded."
The rules should be balanced with common sense. There are exceptions to three of them. Keeping yur finger off the trigger until you intend to fire the gun or activate the trigger mechanism(dry fire) is the only one I can find no exception to. You should follow the spirit of the rules rather than the letter. following the spirit of the rules tells you not to point your gun at anyone you are not wiling to kill. Following the letter of the rules would end up like this: If you are not willing to destroy our planet, why would you point a gun at it? Do you see how ridiculous that is?
Number 4 says "be sure of your target and what lies beyond it."
She was sure of her target and what was beyond it. That's why she grabbed the .357 instead of the shotgun.:evil:
Have a good day.
Thanks, I'll try to do that. I hope you will to.

tetchaje1
April 1, 2003, 07:48 PM
As it turns out, someone had moved the trash can under a bedroom window, used a brick to smash the glass and crawled through the window.

This is your first indication that the person rustling around in the kitchen wasn't her grandchild... :rolleyes:

That said, I personally would have waited until I could see my target and confirm hostile. However, I'm also not a 64-year old widow living alone...

tetchaje1
April 1, 2003, 07:52 PM
Doesn't sound like she knew that at the time.

Could have been her brother (may have got kicked out of his house and needed a place to stay, or just checking on her), one of her kids, a neighbor, the police or anyone else checking on her wellfare[sic].


It is a safe bet that any of these people would knock first, wait for her to open, perhaps try calling, and at the very least identify themselves before pitching a brick through the window.

I don't know a single person that would do this with my apartment or anybody elses. My friends and family don't go breaking glass to come into my apartment if nobody answers the door. She could deduce that the perp didn't use the door because it was locked, and I would be willing to bet that a brick flying through pane glass would make a resounding crash that could be hear throughout the house.

Your comments are borderline ridiculous... :scrutiny:

spacemanspiff
April 1, 2003, 08:14 PM
tough call here.... when i took the class for my CHL, one of the ladies also taking the class said that "anyone who enters my home is going to get shot!" she didn't care if it was family friend or foe. her excuse was 'my family knows better than to try and sneak in my home."

a person must plan out what they will do if someone enters each window. what cover do you take? chances are the person coming in won't know your place well enough to figure out where you are hiding. if you choose your hiding hole wisely enough, you can determine who the potential threat is before reacting, even determining if the subject has any noticeable weapons on his/her person. shooting first and asking questions later only complicates the situation.

grateful it turned out okay in this instance, but by no means should it be advocated to shoot towards shadows.

Quartus
April 1, 2003, 08:31 PM
Have you considered that she lives in her house and therefore knows exactly who belongs there and who doesn't? She knew that whoever was there shoudn't have been there, so she shot him.


I think that about says it. SHE knows her circumstances - we don't. There are many perfectly normal circumstances under which she could have KNOWN that a person in her house was an intruder. If you are a widow living alone, that is enough to establish a threat.

Double Maduro
April 1, 2003, 09:02 PM
Triad,

My replies are in orangered so that I can keep my place, this is getting confusing.

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
It is overly late when you have pulled the trigger and find out you have killed one of your loved ones. That is the reason for the rule.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Have you considered that she lives in her house and therefore knows exactly who belongs there and who doesn't? She knew that whoever was there shoudn't have been there, so she shot him.

I don't know about you but if one of my elderly neighbors doesn't answer her door, I get concerned. I have keys to most of my neighbors homes and would not think twice about checking on any of them if I thought something was wrong.



quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I prefer to be sure of what I am going to destroy simply because I can't call the bullet back.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


I agree totally. She was sure of what she was going to destroy. The intruder.


But she didn't know who the intruder was.

This is like assuming the gun is unloaded.

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I also prefer to know that I am in danger before I pull the trigger.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


This is a personal argument. I hope for your sake the proof you are in danger doesn't come in the form of a shotgun slug hitting you in the chest. It is my opinion that if you are in my house without my permission I am in danger. You do not feel the same which is fine.

Evidently the intruder didn't know she was home because she didn't answer when someone knocked at her door. Why would you not ask who was there? Maybe her thinking isn't always the clearest.

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The 4 rules are rules darnit. They don't say "all guns are always loaded, except--" "they say all guns are always loaded."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


The rules should be balanced with common sense. There are exceptions to three of them. Keeping yur finger off the trigger until you intend to fire the gun or activate the trigger mechanism(dry fire) is the only one I can find no exception to. You should follow the spirit of the rules rather than the letter. following the spirit of the rules tells you not to point your gun at anyone you are not wiling to kill. Following the letter of the rules would end up like this: If you are not willing to destroy our planet, why would you point a gun at it? Do you see how ridiculous that is?

Give me a break.

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Number 4 says "be sure of your target and what lies beyond it."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


She was sure of her target and what was beyond it. That's why she grabbed the .357 instead of the shotgun.

How can you be sure of your target when you are shooting through a closed door. She had no idea who was there or why and it is pure dumb luck that she hit anything except the next door neighbor.

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Have a good day.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Thanks, I'll try to do that. I hope you will to.


Thanks, I have.

Double Maduro
April 1, 2003, 09:14 PM
tetchaje1,

That is the point, she had no Idea that the window was broken. Soemone, she assumes it was the bg- even more she assumed it was a bg, knocked on her door and she didn't answer. Could have beedn a relative or neighbor checking on her.

She didn't know who she was shooting at! She may have assumed it was a bad guy. In this case it turned out she was right. But what if she was wrong?

We have all, well maybe I should say I, have done some stupid things in our lives, but I don't think I have ever done anything as stupid as shooting at a shadow through a closed door.

No I take that back, I am sure I haven't.

Double Maduro
April 1, 2003, 09:21 PM
Quartus,

Yes, she should know who was in her house. She has every right to defend herself.

My point is she had no idea who she was shooting at. She shot through a closed door!

She didn't even know for sure who she had shot 'till the police found him.

I think that it was a bad choice to shoot when she did.

I haven't even talked about her choice of weapon, and won't. This is not a challenge.

Boy this thread is really helping my post count. LOL

Triad
April 1, 2003, 09:53 PM
Double Maduro, i will reply to your orange comments in numerical order OK? Maybe that will simplify things.

#1- Yes I would check on my neighbors if i thought something might be wrong. but I ask you, would you just open the door and proceed to search the house without announcing yourself, or would you ring the bell several times, knock very loudly, then open the door and proceed inside while shouting loudly and often "MRS. JOHNSON! IT'S DOUBLE MADURO! I CAME OVER TO MAKE SURE YOU'RE ALRIGHT!

#2- She didn't need to know who the intruder was. He was an INTRUDER. HE DID NOT BELONG THERE. This is not like assuming the gun is unloaded. This is like assuming the gun IS loaded. A loaded gun is a dangerous thing. So is an unknown intruder. Assuming the intruder is friendly until proven otherwise is just as stupid as assuming a gun is unloaded until proven otherwise.

#3- Because I don't feel like answering the door, maybe I'm sick, on the toilet, in the shower or asleep. Maybe I heard them at the door and called out to them because I couldn't come right away and they didn't hear me. Just because someone doesn't answer the door doesn't give you the right to enter without their permission. I think you may be looking at this too personally. You say you have your neighbors keys. I bet you also have their permission to enter their home if they don't answer the door or if someon asks you check up on them right? Like I said, if you enter someone's home without their permission you are in the wrong and may suffer the consequences.

#4-Give you a break from what? If all your guns are always loaded, how do you clean them safely? How can a gunsmith work on them? Do you mean to tell you have never pointed a loaded gun at something you did not wish to destroy? If you have ever held a gun you must have because you seem to think there can be no exceptions to the rules.

#5- She KNEW it was someone who didn't belong there. That's good enough for me.

#6- Good.

RE: Your reply to tetchaje1, have you considered she may KNOW none of her friends or neighbors would come in her house like that?

Quartus
April 1, 2003, 10:02 PM
My point is she had no idea who she was shooting at.


We don't know what she knew. She could have known that he was an intruder.

That's all she needed to know.

DMK
April 1, 2003, 10:36 PM
I'm just glad it ended with the good guys being safe and the bad guys being bleeding. The local constabulary showing support was icing on the cake.

It doesn't often end up like that in Kali and Jersey now does it?

Double Maduro
April 2, 2003, 01:05 PM
Triad, Quartus,

You are missing the point.

I agree that she had every right to defend her self. I agree that she had every right to blow the bad guy away.

Hell, I even believe that she has the right to sue his parents for raising him to be a bg.

The point is, one last time:

SHE DIDN'T KNOW WHAT SHE WAS SHOOTING AT!

She shot through a closed door, at a shadow.

Let me ask those of you who think that she did the right thing.

Would you have shot through a closed door at a shadow? If not, why not?

I can see that this is just going to go back and forth and never be resolved. I don't think that she acted properly by shooting through a closed door at the shadow of something she didn't know who or what caused.

You think she acted properly.

It is time to agree to disagree.

This is my last post on this thread.
It has been interesting.

Triad
April 2, 2003, 05:50 PM
You are missing my point. She knew EXACTLY what she was shooting at. SHE WAS SHOOTING AT THE INTRUDER!

Double Maduro
April 2, 2003, 06:32 PM
ok, I lied this is the last post I will make on this thread.

I will agree that she was shooting at the intruder.

She is just lucky that THE INTRUDER wasn't her son who had a fight with his wife, stormed out of the house, got drunk, and needed a place to stay. After knocking on his dear old moms door and getting no response, he decides to let himself in, when, you guessed it. He discovers that when he stormed out of the house he left his keys to DEAR OLD MOM's house at home.

He then went around back and broke the window so he could get in and sleep it off, "I'll fix it tomorrow he thought." "Mom never liked my wife anyway, so it will be okay." (He is drunk and not thinking clearly, remember?)

But he never got a chance to fix it because DEAR OLD MOM thought he was a burglar and shot him through the door. It is not the first time something similat to this has happened. (Kid comes home from school to surprise parents who, not expecting hem/her shoot at the shadow of an intruder in the doorway)

People do stupid things. They often do things that get them killed. In this case we are all glad it was a bad guy and that the headlines didn't scream, "Grandmother shoots son by accident".

She probably wouldn't have had to shoot anyone if she had just yelled through the door, "Who is it?"

If you can't see the potential for disaster by someone shooting through a closed door at someone who's shadow is all that she knows about them, then it isn't worth my time arguing with you.

Better yet, what would your reaction be if it had been her son on the other side of the door?

Triad
April 2, 2003, 06:49 PM
She probably wouldn't have had to shoot anyone if she had just yelled through the door, "Who is it?" Anybody that didn't need to be shot would would have announced who they were and what they doing.
Better yet, what would your reaction be if it had been her son on the other side of the door?
My reaction would be that her son had a case of terminal stupidity. If you can't understand that you shouldn't break into other people's homes it isn't worth my time arguing with you.

joebogey
April 2, 2003, 07:40 PM
I feel like I must be the most stupid person on this board.

I was tickled to death to learn the poor, sweet, little, old lady had managed to dispatch a bad guy without gettin a scratch, and in the meantime, showing more spunk than someone half her age. She then lives happily ever after.

Then you guys argue for the next 3 days over what she did wrong, and how stupid she was.

I don't know how I could have ever felt this lady had done a "good" thing". I understand now, that She should be locked up and the key thrown away. She's a danger to the public. :rolleyes:


Guys....She's an old lady! She's lucky that she's able to lift a gun and pull the trigger. And you're right, she didn't follow all the rules. But, we're not talkin bout Tamara or some of the other Ladies on this board who train for this sort of thing on a regular basis.


Get over yourselves and give the lady a break. By showing some guts, she's still here on earth and kickin. And another bad guy is off the streets. I think she should get a medal.

If ya wanna b*tch at me for this post, lay it on me. I've got broad shoulders. But some of you get so caught up in the forest, you forget to notice the trees.

<rant off>

Quartus
April 2, 2003, 09:33 PM
double, why is this complicated? You are ASSUMING that she could not know that a person in her house at that hour was an unwelcome intruder.


Without knowing her personal circumstances, you cannot make that assumption.


It may very well have been that she lived alone, had no family, and no neighbors who were friendly. Ergo, anyone in her house without her permission is automatically a bad guy, and therefore a threat.

And a threat - ANY THREAT - to a little old lady is a much bigger threat than the same threat to we uberTactical He-Man Gun Nuts.

We can afford to give more leeway than she can. She's already at a terrible disadvantage - she can't afford to give up any advantage she has.

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