The use of different calibres?


PDA






andym79
August 27, 2005, 11:02 AM
What is the best calibre for target practice at:
50 yards?
100 yards?

For killing within a 150 yards:
A rabbit?
A deer?
An elk?
A black bear?
A grizzly bear?

:confused:

If you enjoyed reading about "The use of different calibres?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Whatsit
August 27, 2005, 12:03 PM
I'd use AT LEAST a .50 BMG for those pesky monty python rabbits!

CAnnoneer
August 27, 2005, 12:07 PM
The Holy Handgrenade of Antioch shall blow them all to tiny bits,
in Lord's mercy.

;)

andym79
August 27, 2005, 12:17 PM
Why stop at a hand grenade, drop a H-bomb on that bunny!

Crosshair
August 27, 2005, 12:34 PM
You guy's now owe me a new keyboard. Mine is now soaked with Diet Pepsi.

OK, now getting serious.

.22LR
.357 Magnum
44 Magnum
454 Casull
454 Casull or better.

Though I would prefer a rifle to a handgun in those last two.

andym79
August 28, 2005, 06:35 AM
Would this combo be ok?

Target practice: .22
Rabbit: .177!
Deer: .308!
Elk: .357!
Black bear .357!
Grizzly: .454 Casull or Ruger .480!

pauli
August 28, 2005, 07:39 AM
sounds great if you don't mind getting eaten from time to time.

Black Majik
August 28, 2005, 02:06 PM
assuming handgun calibers:
50 yrds:. .45 ACP
100 yrds: .45 ACP

Rabbit: 45-70, 500S&W, 460 Rowland, 480 Ruger, 454 Casull.
Deer: .44 Magnum
Elk: .454 Casull or 500 S&W
Black Bear: .454 Casull
Grizzly Bear: .500S&W or .45-70

MTMilitiaman
August 28, 2005, 04:08 PM
Okay if you're shooting at 150 yards, why not have a rifle? I thought the whole point of hunting with a handgun was the added challenge of getting close to your quarry.

Vern Humphrey
August 28, 2005, 04:24 PM
What is the best calibre for target practice at:
50 yards?
100 yards?

Standard bullseye competition includes 50 yard stages. Since the .22LR is shot in these stages, it is obviously an adequate cartridge.

Very few handgun competitions include shooting at 100 yards. An exception to this is International Handgun Mettalic Silhouette Association (IHMSA) matches. In this game the targets are 80 heavy metal silhouettes on stands; 20 grouse ("chickens") at 50 meters, 20 javalina ("pigs") at 100 meters, 20 turkeys at 150 meters and 20 bighorn rams at 200 meters. The targets must be shot in order (left to right) and a hit counts only if the silhouette is knocked down.

For IHMSA, heavy calibers are used. The competition falls into four categories -- Revolver, Production, Standing and Unlimited. In the Revolver category, only revolvers can be used. In the Production category semi-automatics and single-shots are used with no modifications allowed (except for ready-made grips or stocks.) In the Unlimited category, the guns are limited by dimensions and weight, but not by design. In the Standing category, all shots are taken from the standing, unsupported position.

For killing within a 150 yards:
A rabbit?
A deer?
An elk?
A black bear?
A grizzly bear?


For rabbit at 150 yards, a single shot pistol, like the Thompson-Center Contender or Encore chambered in .223 Remington might be ideal. If you're hunting for meat, full metal jackets would be best. For varmits you don't intend to eat (like jackrabbits), frangible bullets designed for varmits are indicated.

For deer, elk and black bear, a Thompson-Center Encore in .308 Winchester (7.62X51mm NATO) would be idea.

For Grizzley at that range, the .308 might be acceptable, but a .45-70 would also be a good choice.

Pistol Toter
August 28, 2005, 05:40 PM
LIttle Miss Muffet, sat on her tuffet, eating her curds and whey.
There dropped from a glidder, an H-bomb beside her, and blew her away. :banghead:

Rob1035
August 28, 2005, 05:47 PM
150'=.22LR
300'=.223, .17HMR (T/C pistol I guess :cool: )

That's what I'd do at least

pauli
August 28, 2005, 06:04 PM
trivia note: federal indicates that one of the intended uses for their 10ga 3.5" magnum slugs is "rabbit."

andym79
August 28, 2005, 06:09 PM
Not being disrespectful to shootgun owners and users.

Shotguns are completley valid, and I do see the point to them for protection and hunting when there is a flock of birds. But don't they take all the skill out of hunting?

Isn't hunting about sneaking up on the prey and matching yourself against it? One good shot, preferably in the head, taking it down testing your skill, your accuracy?

If its just about killing then yere a shootgun is great!

Vern Humphrey
August 28, 2005, 06:27 PM
Shotguns are completley valid, and I do see the point to them for protection and hunting when there is a flock of birds. But don't they take all the skill out of hunting?

No. In many areas, shotguns only are allowed for deer. In such cases, the hunter must get closer than if he had a rifle.

For turkey, you will often find a wise old gobbler who "hangs up" just out of shotgun range. A rifle would take him easily -- but it takes skill to get within shotgun range of him.

Isn't hunting about sneaking up on the prey and matching yourself against it? One good shot, preferably in the head, taking it down testing your skill, your accuracy?


I'm gonna guess you go hunting with John Kerry. ;)

You rarely "sneak up" on prey -- for small game, like squirrels, you usually detect them within shotgun range. Most "sneaking up" is to get a clear shot. For deer you normally "pattern" the quarry by finding his normal routes, scrapes, feeding and bedding areas and set up a stand. Alternatively, you drive -- that is, several hunters move through an area, with other hunters in position on exits and trails.

In some states, deer hunting with dogs is common. Rabbit hunting with dogs, and even squirrel hunting with dogs is also common.

As for shooting game through the head, that may work on squirrels, but for larger game, the heart-lung shot is much preferred. Would you take the chance on shooting an antler off a 7 X 7 bull elk?

Majic
August 28, 2005, 07:36 PM
Andym79,
Spend 15 minutes in shotgun only hunting territory and see what you are up against. Try sneaking up on anything when you are in briars up to your armpits or in brush so thick you can't see past a few feet in front of you. Take that head shot when the game is in full run and you will only see it for a few seconds at the most. You can stand on a path or road in the woods with the brush so thick on both sides that you can't see for 5 feet and hear the deer running, but have no idea where it may decide to cross.
No skill in shotgun hunting? Come try it our way and see if skill and accuracy is needed.

Taurus 66
August 28, 2005, 07:45 PM
Rabbit, Squirrel - 50 BMG, .454

Fox, Coyote - 30-30, 30-06, .308

Deer, Antelope - .223

Alligators, Crocodile - .22 LR, .22 WMR

Black Bear, Grizzly Bear - .17

Or was it the other way around? :confused:

Vern Humphrey
August 28, 2005, 07:49 PM
No skill in shotgun hunting? Come try it our way and see if skill and accuracy is needed.

I never thought much of deer hunting with dogs -- until I joined a hunt club in King and Queen County. Talk about a jungle!

If you enjoyed reading about "The use of different calibres?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!