Anti-gun activist shot


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Desertdog
August 29, 2005, 08:42 PM
Maybe they need to make the laws more draconian due to this shooting. Common sense says, "Please let me be able to defend myself".

Anti-gun activist shot
Scarborough man killed at site of his annual Stop Violence BBQ

Natalie Alcoba
National Post
http://www.canada.com/national/nationalpost/news/story.html?id=1c9b8374-039c-4f35-acd0-bc11531acbc3


TORONTO - A father was gunned down last night in the same Scarborough apartment building courtyard where he weeks ago staged a ''Stop-the-Violence'' barbecue, residents said.

The shooting of the man -- identified by friends as Delroy, but known as ''Sploogle'' -- happened just before 7 p.m. on the basketball courts of an apartment building at 3181 Eglinton Avenue East, near Markham Road.

Police said there was an altercation, and he was shot more than once by a man.

As many as 20 people, many of them children, were in the area at the time.

The victim, said to be between 35 and 40 years old, was taken to Sunnybrook Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

For the year, shooting deaths now total 32, a number that already eclipses the 27 killed by gunfire during the whole of 2004. A man was reportedly injured yesterday in another incident after he dove for cover from the spray of gunfire near a daycare centre in the area of Kingston Road and Victoria Park Avenue.

News of the Scarborough shooting left some of the residents of the apartment complex shattered.

''He comes back and he tries to help the youth,'' said one man who identified himself as Delroy's friend. ''It's ironic that something like this happened.''

The man, who did not want to identify himself, said Delroy used to live in the building outside of which the shooting occurred. He immigrated to Canada from Kingston, Jamaica, several years ago and had 10 children, the man said.

The family lived in the nearby Lawrence Avenue and Markham Road area.

Delroy was known for being generous with area children, fixing bikes and breaking up fights.

In the past few years, Delroy has staged a summer barbecue in the building's courtyard, which is shared with two other buildings. Hundreds of people turned up for the event this month.

He recruited sponsors, offered hot dogs and gave away gifts, which had been donated, to children. He even had T-shirts made that said ''Stop the Violence'' on them, the friend said.

The recent violence on Toronto's streets provided further motivation for Delroy, he said.

''Everybody is just fed up about the shootings,'' the man said.

More than a dozen people have been killed over the past month in the city alone, leaving politicians and police scrambling to come up with a plan to stop the bloodshed.

"Guns do not have a place in Toronto," Mayor David Miller told reporters this month as he announced plans to hire 150 new police officers. "I am not going to let our city become one where gun crimes are routine."

The murder rate has been generally falling since 1991, when the city had 89 homicides.

But flare-ups in gun violence in recent years have shone a spotlight on the city's poorer suburbs.

"There's an increase in gang violence in the city, and a lot of the violence that we've seen with guns in the last couple of months has been gang-on-gang," Dave Wilson, head of the Toronto Police Association, told Reuters recently.

Police Chief Bill Blair has said gang rivalries have been intensified by increased access to guns that have either been smuggled from the United States or stolen from gun owners in Canada.

According to Toronto police statistics, about 1,200 guns have been seized so far in 2005, consistent with previous years.

Anyone with information can contact Toronto police through Crime Stoppers at 416-222-TIPS (8477), or online at www.222tips.com

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MN_Strelok
August 29, 2005, 09:03 PM
"Guns do not have a place in Toronto," Mayor David Miller told reporters this month as he announced plans to hire 150 new police officers.

Anyone else spot the irony here? :rolleyes:

Commissar Gribb
August 29, 2005, 09:09 PM
Anyone else spot the irony here?

I thought the new cops were going to be armed with super soakers!?

Standing Wolf
August 29, 2005, 09:23 PM
The shooting of the man -- identified by friends as Delroy, but known as ''Sploogle''...


Maybe some thief just wanted his nickname.

TallPine
August 29, 2005, 10:00 PM
another gun control success story ...

:rolleyes:

Atticus
August 29, 2005, 10:07 PM
"The victim, said to be between 35 and 40 years old..."

"He immigrated to Canada from Kingston, Jamaica, several years ago and had 10 children, the man said."

Ol' Delroy wasn't shooting blanks either. Perhaps NARAL was involved in the shooting.

4v50 Gary
August 29, 2005, 10:09 PM
I cannot rejoice at this man's death. Being against violence and being against guns are two different things. If he was really against guns, he was misguided and unfortunately paid the price. If he was against violence, whether it was by fist, feet or firearms or knives or any other instrument or body part, then his death is a double tragedy.

Double Maduro
August 29, 2005, 10:38 PM
TORONTO - A father was gunned down last night in the same Scarborough apartment building courtyard where he weeks ago staged a ''Stop-the-Violence'' barbecue, residents said.

The shooting of the man -- identified by friends as Delroy, but known as ''Sploogle'' -- happened just before 7 p.m. on the basketball courts of an apartment building at 3181 Eglinton Avenue East, near Markham Road.

Police said there was an altercation, and he was shot more than once by a man.

As many as 20 people, many of them children, were in the area at the time.

The victim, said to be between 35 and 40 years old, was taken to Sunnybrook Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

I thought he was well known, they don't even give his name, or true age.

Do they really know who this is?

DM

GT
August 30, 2005, 12:09 AM
Double Mad:I thought he was well known, they don't even give his name, or true age.

Do they really know who this is?
It's Canada! Like the US on drugs.

They don't even know enough to come in out of the rain.

G

Jeff
August 30, 2005, 01:02 AM
4v50 Gary,

Very well-said. I agree totally.

He was misguided by his pacifist convictions. Sometimes pacifism does nothing but illustrate how an idealistic square peg can't fit into a realistic round hole.

C96
August 30, 2005, 01:15 AM
As I read the article, it seems that Spoogle was anti-violence and was trying
to address that issue with some good works. I saw the anti-guns issue only
from the Mayor.

It seems the Mayor doesn't want to address the violence issue, just the guns issue.

A much simpler problem for politocos to get their little minds wrapped around.

From just the article, it seems Spoogle was a good guy trying to help.

allan

Henry Bowman
August 30, 2005, 10:45 AM
He recruited sponsors, offered hot dogs and gave away gifts, which had been donated, to children. He even had T-shirts made that said ''Stop the Violence'' on them, the friend said. Maybe he should have been wearing a "Don't hurt me. I'm unarmed." T-shirt.

Control Group
August 30, 2005, 11:06 AM
I'm with 4v50 Gary, Jeff, and C96: nothing in the article indicates that he was anti-gun (in the political sense), he was anti-violence. It seems likely that he, personally, wouldn't ever own a gun - which I consider foolish, but not offensive - but it doesn't indicate that he made any efforts to legislate guns away from other people.

There's nothing wrong with pacifism (aside from being a victim-in-waiting), as long as the pacifist doesn't try and force me to be pacifist, too.

Sounds to me like the mayor and the media are painting the guy as anti-gun, trying to use his unfortunate death to push their statist disarmament agenda.

Beren
August 30, 2005, 11:16 AM
This about sums it up for me:

"It needs but one foe to breed a war, not two, Master Warden. And those who have not swords can still die upon them."

DirksterG30
August 30, 2005, 11:44 AM
"It needs but one foe to breed a war, not two, Master Warden. And those who have not swords can still die upon them."

How true. Isn't that from the Lord of the Rings?

Lionhill
August 30, 2005, 11:50 AM
In this specific situation, the Liberal Canadian media omitted to add that he had 12 dime bags of pot in his pocket when shot:

Residents of a housing project in the Eglinton Ave. E. and Markham Rd. area yesterday set up a makeshift memorial in the courtyard where 41-year-old Delroy “Sploogle” Daring was gunned down last Thursday. (Astrid Poei, SUN)

DELROY "SPLOOGLE" Daring's slaying was the result of a jailhouse death contract issued by a drug rival who he helped send to prison, sources say.

Daring, gunned down in a crowded Scarborough courtyard Thursday, was the target of two previous unsuccessful hits, including a botched shooting, community sources said.

The death of the father of 10 is expected to bring a new wave of gun violence to the city as the Markham and Eglinton Boys, to which Daring belonged, go after his killer, sources warned.

LEADING DEALER

Daring, 41, was considered among the leading drug dealers, earning enough from crime proceeds to build a large home in his native Jamaica, sources said.

He was shot four times outside a housing project in the Eglinton Ave. E. and Markham Rd. area in a hail of gunfire that sent up to 20 people scrambling for cover. There have been no arrests.

"He was being stalked by gunmen," one gang source said yesterday. "He was warned of the contract a number of times."

Daring had a criminal record dating to 1986, five years after moving to Canada from Jamaica at age 17, police sources said.

He had been ordered deported from Canada for being here illegally, but was granted a stay by an immigration board, police said.

He had began providing police information about three weeks ago in a bid to jail rival dealers, sources said. That led to the arrest of a leader of the rival Markham-Eglinton Crew, gang sources said.

It was that man who issued the murder contract on Daring from the Don jail, sources said.

The contract was made a priority after Daring held an anti-gun barbecue and children's sports day Aug. 7, at which gang members suspected he was co-operating with police and "naming names," sources said.

Homicide squad Det. John Biggerstaff said there were other attempts on Daring's life, including one in which shots were fired at his barbecue.

"He was a target," Biggerstaff said. "This person has a history of violence and a history of drugs."

Police found 12 "dime bags" of pot in his pockets after his murder.

Biggerstaff stressed Daring was not an anti-gun or anti-violence activist.

"This is an untruth," he said yesterday. "The activities that brought him to the courtyard are inconsistent with someone who is against gun violence."

TheEgg
August 30, 2005, 11:57 AM
:neener:
So, just another dead drug thug. Whoever wrote the original article now has an inside track on winning the next Pulitzer Prize!

MaterDei
August 30, 2005, 12:00 PM
Where the heck did the National Post get off saying that he was anti-violence at all? Is that the Canadian version of the NYT?

http://torontosun.com/News/TorontoAndGTA/2005/08/28/pf-1191263.html

MaterDei
August 30, 2005, 12:04 PM
Daring had a criminal record dating to 1986, five years after moving to Canada from Jamaica at age 17, police sources said.

He had been ordered deported from Canada for being here illegally, but was granted a stay by an immigration board, police said.
Gee, this sounds familiar...

El Tejon
August 30, 2005, 12:06 PM
Mater, many gang leaders are "anti-violence". Same situation in Chicago, gang leaders will pose with the politicians at a 'Guns Are Bad" rally while dealing drugs and murdering rivals.

Gun control aids the politician and other criminals. :)

Jet22
August 30, 2005, 12:06 PM
He will go down in history as a Canadian anti-gun martar! :banghead:

Control Group
August 30, 2005, 12:09 PM
*sigh*

You'd think I'd have learned by now that almost everything I read from the MSM is complete crap. Shame on me.

jacobtowne
August 30, 2005, 12:12 PM
And naturally the whole affair is the fault of the US.

"Police Chief Bill Blair has said gang rivalries have been intensified by increased access to guns that have either been smuggled from the United States or stolen from gun owners in Canada."

JT

Robert Hairless
August 30, 2005, 12:33 PM
Whether Daring was an anti-violence advocate or not, his murder in Scarborough on Thursday evening is "appalling," the mayor said. (From the Toronto Sun followup on this story at http://www.torontosun.com/News/TorontoAndGTA/2005/08/27/1190194-sun.html)

Murder is appalling. But Toronto's Mayor David Miller is not part of the solution. Miller is part of the problem, and he is a major cause of that problem in Toronto. The bottom line is that Miller is glorifying a major drug dealer but the problem Miller represents is even more serious.

Miller's police department, the Toronto police department, made a pact with the devil. From the police point of view they were playing Delroy Daring (the drug dealer who was murdered), protecting him while he helped them go after his competitors. From Delroy Daring's point of view he had an entire police department behind him as he rid himself of his competition while he himself was being protected. I understand that the deal is a standard police tactic: it helps them get good press. On the streets, however, what difference does it make if drugs are being sold by Daring or by his competitors?

Daring evidently was a clever man who learned to imitate Miller and his police department. What Daring realized was that it was in his own interests to be anti-gun. Miller and his police department were using the government's resources to disarm Daring's competitors and his victims while they protected Daring. That allowed Daring and his crew the firepower because they were being protected by Miller's police department. Daring benefited. The police department benefited. Miller benefited. Daring's competitors, however, were the losers because they were being extinguished. And the citizens of Toronto were losers because their mayor and police department were assisting in the creation of a drug monopoly in Toronto.

The difference between Daring's competitors and the citizens of Toronto is that Daring's competitors were smart enough to see what was happening.

Robert Hairless
August 30, 2005, 12:40 PM
And naturally the whole affair is the fault of the US.

"Police Chief Bill Blair has said gang rivalries have been intensified by increased access to guns that have either been smuggled from the United States or stolen from gun owners in Canada."

JT

Quite right. The situation is a slap in the face of Canada's government and they must correct it immediately. They need to persuade Canada's criminals that it is unpatriotic to smuggle guns from the United States. I suggest that Canada immediately implement a "STEAL CANADA" campaign. That campaign will solve Canada's problem with violent drug dealers and allow its citizens to sleep better at night.

Robert Hairless
August 30, 2005, 01:33 PM
This bumper sticker is offered purely in the spirit of cooperation with Mayor David Miller and the Toronto Police Department in support of their campaign to protect their favorite drug dealers.

Drizzt
August 30, 2005, 01:38 PM
‘Anti-gun activist shot'? It's ironic, but untrue

By CHRISTIE BLATCHFORD

Saturday, August 27, 2005 Updated at 2:02 AM EDT


‘Gun foe shot dead” read a front-page headline in yesterday's Toronto Sun. “Anti-gun activist shot,” said the National Post's about the same event.

The evidence of the dead man's alleged opposition to guns came in the accompanying stories, which quoted an anonymous friend of the victim of the area who spoke warmly of how the man had organized a summer barbecue in recent years where he gave away hotdogs and T-shirts that read “Stop the Violence.”

It was surely “ironic,” this friend said, that such a fellow would himself have been taken down by the gun.

Well, not quite, but more about that in a minute.

There was a big fat inference there to be drawn, and by dawn, local radio stations had drawn it indeed, and the airwaves swelled with outrage at the slaying of the alleged activist, with everyone, from Mayor David Miller on down, duly noting with sadness that the deceased was also father of 10.

It appeared for all the world that Canada's biggest city had lost another stellar citizen — and most cruelly, lost to the gun violence that has plagued Toronto this summer one who had dedicated himself to solving the problem.

Alas and alack, there is rather less to this touching portrait than it may seem.

Delroy George Daring was the dead man, and it need not be said that his murder was vicious, brazen and cowardly. It was also dangerous, coming as it did early on a summer's night at the busy courtyard that sits in the middle of a public housing project in the Eglinton Avenue East/Markham Road area, with people out on the grounds or on their balconies.

But Mr. Daring, who died of multiple gunshot wounds (eight bullet holes were noted at the hospital where he was taken, although with an autopsy slated only for today, it is too soon to know whether some of the holes were exit wounds), was hardly a community leader — or, if he was, then that he was speaks directly to a poverty of leadership.

First of all, he had a significant criminal record that spanned a decade, beginning in 1986 when he was but 22 and one of those arrested in a major-for-its-time narcotics bust (four people were charged after an eight-month investigation into the sale of marijuana, hashish and cocaine in Scarborough) that even made one of the local papers.

By the time of his last conviction, in 1996, Mr. Daring had acquired a total of seven criminal convictions, six for drugs (both for possession and possession for the purpose of trafficking) and one for assault with a weapon.

Now to be fair, in the intervening years, it is of course possible Mr. Daring turned his life around, and developed a distaste for the criminal life.

However, there is little beyond the barbecue and the T-shirts to suggest this, and the fact that at the time of his death, he was carrying 13 “dime” bags of marijuana — an amount that could be interpreted as being either for his personal use or for selling — hints that this rehabilitation, if it was under way, was hardly complete.

Neither, I think, could Mr. Daring be put forward as a candidate for father-of-the-year.

His 10 children are apparently shared among four different so-called “baby mothers,” one of whom lives near the complex where he was shot and killed. Unless he led a quadruple life, it is probably safe to say that there are not enough hours in the day to have allowed him, or anyone else for that matter, to be an involved and faithful parent to children spread out among so many disparate households.

My purpose in noting these aspects of the victim's life is not to diminish his death, or to suggest that he deserved such a fate, or to minimize the pain and grief felt by those who surely loved him, and will miss him.

It is rather to say that leaping to label this 41-year-old man a leader or activist does a disservice to those who, within the impoverished city neighbourhoods being torn apart by gun violence, actually are working in ways large and small to better their communities and get guns off the street.

Secondarily, to know the whole of who Mr. Daring was ought to go some distance to quelling neighbourhood fears.

This was what the police call a “targeted” shooting, not a senseless act of random violence, and at least at first blush, it may have been drugs-related. Many, if not most, of the shootings in the city could be similarly classified: The victims are usually “known to police,” as the euphemism casts it, and they are also usually known to the gunmen, who are also “known to police.” And sometimes, today's victim is yesterday's gunman.

This is no hard-and-fast rule. There are heartbreaking exceptions, such as poor Howard Gairy, a bouncer who was just doing his job when — the very night before he was due to return to Michigan Tech University on a football scholarship — he was coldly gunned down at a nightclub five years ago. There are even children who have taken stray bullets, the latest little Shaquan Cadougan, who was struck four times when gunfire erupted outside his mom's townhouse.

Mr. Daring's slaying was witnessed, police say, by an estimated 20 people who were “on the ground” and an unknown number who may have seen it unfold from their balconies. As of yesterday, one person had come forward to detectives.

That just isn't good enough. There are safe and anonymous ways for citizens to co-operate with police without involving themselves in the criminal justice process if they are fearful, just as there are safe ways for citizens to report to the authorities those they see with guns.

Persuading those who live smack in the places where guns are rife — and who have the most reason to be afraid — is just one part of any potential fix to what is an enormous and complex problem.

But a good start, it seems to me, is in speaking about the issue — victims, gunmen and witnesses — in plain and straightforward language. Surely it isn't necessary to believe Mr. Daring was heroic in order to be angered and stricken by his death.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20050827.blatchford27/BNStory/National/

TonyB
August 30, 2005, 03:21 PM
I really don't get the whole"anti-violence""practice non-violence"thing...every time I don't smack some moron who clearly needs to be smacked am I "practicing non-violence'?

GunGoBoom
August 30, 2005, 03:48 PM
Isn't the Toronto mayor the one who has said that he wants to make his city just like Chicago, gun-free and therefore safe? :rolleyes:

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