Attention Pilots...


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SkaerE
March 27, 2003, 05:46 PM
Help me out if you can.

I am prior service (19D) and am in the process of submitting my packet to become a Flight Warrent Officer and go back into the Army. Right now I'm studying to take the AFAST (Flight test) I have a couple questions for anyone who may know...Ive gotten mixed answers in the past, maybe some here can help clear it up.

1.) what else does a flight warrent officer do other than fly? i learned a long time ago that i cant throw a recruiter very far and that i should trust them even less...so of course they dont mention anything but flying. so in the real Army, what else?

2.) what kind of unit should i attempt to get put in to fly the most?

3.) how long is Warrent Officer school? Flight school?

4.) Once I graduate from flight school do I then have a civilian pilots license as well?


if i can come up w/any more i'll edit this post,

thanks

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blades67
March 27, 2003, 06:09 PM
There will be much PMCS in your future, as well as many inspections, mission planning briefings, general meetings, special meetings, numerous formations, more P.T. than you'll want to think about, lots of "Hurry up and wait." and too many AAR's. God forbid you make a mistake because that just triples the paperwork and meetings. Oh, and sometimes you'll fly an aircraft.

SkaerE
March 27, 2003, 06:12 PM
more PT than in a combat arms MOS? i find that hard to believe. keep in mind, i've been in the Army before, so i did figure there would be a lot of PMCS and hurrying up to wait.

so you really dont fly much?

Greg L
March 27, 2003, 06:28 PM
From what I've heard (10 years ago when I was last in), WO's fly a lot more than regular officers.

One thing to keep in mind is that the guys a couple of years ahead of you (those that are flying NOW) are going to have a bunch of combat air time. Promotions will be easier for them (assuming that we aren't still fighting by the time that you get out of all the training). I'm not saying that it is a bad idea, just something to keep in the back of your mind.

Greg

Bobarino
March 27, 2003, 07:16 PM
i can only answer one part of your question. no, you will not have civilian ratings when you leave the military. there are provisions that make it easier for you to do, but you still have to do some training and take FAA checkrides.

Bobby

Blackhawk
March 27, 2003, 07:38 PM
1.) what else does a flight warrent officer do other than fly? i learned a long time ago that i cant throw a recruiter very far and that i should trust them even less...so of course they dont mention anything but flying. so in the real Army, what else?

2.) what kind of unit should i attempt to get put in to fly the most?

3.) how long is Warrent Officer school? Flight school?

4.) Once I graduate from flight school do I then have a civilian pilots license as well?


1. It's Warrant (with no "e"). An aviation warrant officer is a specialist in flying aircraft, and that's about all one can be required to do.

2. You will be assigned according to the Army's needs.

3. They're contemporaneous over about a year.

4. Not until you go the FAA and do some paperwork. You will be entitled to a pilot's license commensurate with your military ratings and experience.

Kentucky Rifle
March 28, 2003, 08:55 AM
Get as much time in as many types as you can.

KR

Leatherneck
March 28, 2003, 03:32 PM
Blackhawk, as usual, nailed it.
My son-in-law just finished up WOC school, pilot training, and Blackhawk (i.e., the helo, not the THR guy) transition training. Alltold it took him 14 months at Ft. Rucker, and he's now in Korea for a one-year unaccompanied tour. He was adamant that he wanted to fly the H-60, as they seem to get the most flight time. The Army wanted him to go "Little Birds". He had been with the Brigade at Ft. Campbell as a crew chief, so Blackhawks were a natural. He got his commercial license the month before he got his Army wings. Simple written test covering the differences between military flying regs and the FARs.

Good luck.

TC
TFL Survivor

Blackhawk
March 28, 2003, 04:24 PM
Get as much time in as many types as you can.You can't be PIC in any Army aircraft you have not first transitioned to even if it's the same type and weight class. That usually involves getting orders for the transition school. There used to be some utility aircraft you didn't need to go through the school for if you were in certain areas and could get an IP for that aircraft sign off on you.

Actually, I think the Army's way on that is superior to the FARs. I've picked up airplanes I'd never been in before and wound up reading the operator's manual on climb out. Of course, I often wonder how I ever got to be so old.... :what:

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