Do Mil-Surp guns get any safety check at all?


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TooTech
September 19, 2005, 09:05 PM
I know that every seller of military surplus guns says to have the gun checked by a qualified gunsmith before use, BUT does anyone here really go through the trouble and expense to have that done?

I'd like to believe that someone in the sales channel has checked to see if these guns are an accident waiting to happen.

That said, I've got two VZ24 Mausers with mismatched parts that I'm a little reluctant to fire.

What do you think?

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1911user
September 19, 2005, 09:51 PM
I'd strip it down to small parts then degrease and clean it very well. Inspect all of the parts for damage, wear, or hairline cracks and check the headspace before firing. Check the trigger pull and operation of any safties.

cracked butt
September 19, 2005, 10:24 PM
With a mauser 98, I wouldn't worry too much about firing it. just check the receiver and bolt lugs for cracks or other damage first.

In the most likely worst case scenario, the headspace will be excessive, you'll get a casehead seperation. The base of the brass will still seal the chamber and most if not all of the gas will exit the gun in the right direction. Gasses going in the wrong direction will be vented to the side.

If I'm not confident about a rifle, I'll sandbag it into place, cover the receiver with a half dozen carpet remnants and rugs, and pull the trigger with a string.



Just make sure the bore, chamber, bolt, and receiver are squeaky clean and completely free of cosmoline before firing.

dakotasin
September 19, 2005, 11:46 PM
no... nobody in the channels checked mine, anyway. i've got a massive chamber on one - seperates brass w/o fail on the third firing of even light loads. guess i don't care because i got the mausers to build customs off of. working on #3 now... however, if you are buying the gun to keep and shoot as-is, do be careful and have 'em checked out. fixing headspace problems isn't easy or cheap... well, fairly easy, but not cheap.

3rdpig
September 19, 2005, 11:52 PM
After careful cleaning and inspection I usually go out in the desert, bungie cord the rifle to a folding plastic sawhorse, then pull the trigger with a 20 foot chunk of paracord. I did this with the AK's I built too. Not exactly an elegant solution, but it was cheap and it works.

Good idea putting carpet remnents over the reciever, I'm surprised I didn't think of it myself, smart as I am! :D

Cosmoline
September 20, 2005, 12:51 AM
For the most part, no they are not checked. I had quite a few problems with Mausers back when I collected them, and solved it my just buying a field gauge and doing a check before I bought. I would not recommend firing any parts gun in particular without a headspace check. People have indeed died that way. A Mauser '98 action is certainly strong, but it's not bomb proof and you can still loose your left hand fingers.

I've had far fewer problems with Mosins, I suspect because the rim headspaced design is less sensitive to variation. But even then I stick with matched rifles. Finnish Mosins in particular were carefully headspaced before being issued.

With all-matching rifles in good to mint condition there's little to worry about. But even so if it was with a less-than-ironclad design such as a Krag I'd still get it checked or do some string firing from a safe distance.

Shweboner
September 20, 2005, 01:58 PM
I just started a smal business and just got my FFL...

most guns I will sell will be milsurp, i am testing/checking and firing each one and giving them a 90 day warranty. Basically, I make sure that it works before I sell it, if not I will replace any broken parts for free.

No one else does it, thats why I do. Besides if I spent $100 on a rifle... I want it to work, even though $100 is not a lot of money... its still bad business to sell something that you know nothing about or could be dangerous.

~Brian

DMK
September 20, 2005, 08:41 PM
most guns I will sell will be milsurp, i am testing/checking and firing each one and giving them a 90 day warranty. Basically, I make sure that it works before I sell it, if not I will replace any broken parts for free.

No one else does it, thats why I do.
Oh nice excuse, but we know you're doing it just because you want take every gun out and try it. :neener:

Just joking. :D

jefnvk
September 20, 2005, 10:06 PM
I don't bother with the guns straight from the distributor, although I probably should.

Vet bringbacks, though, I do.

TheEgg
September 21, 2005, 11:26 AM
BUT does anyone here really go through the trouble and expense to have that done?


Yeah, sometimes I have, if I have any doubt in my mind. Otherwise, if after careful inspection and function testing the gun appears in good shape, I do what others here do -- sandbag the gun, attach a string to the trigger, back off, and test. Then carefully check the condition of the gun and the brass, looking for any bad signs. If all appears normal, then I consider it good to go.

If ANYTHING makes a little doubt go off in my mind, I take it to my gunsmith and let him check it out. Cheap insurance.

Edited to add: I talked to an employee of SOG once -- they told me that they DO NOT HAVE ANY ARMORERS or GUNSMITHS there -- they simply re-sell items they get from the importers, and do no testing of the guns they sell at all. If any checking is being done, it is being done at the importer level, I guess.

444
September 21, 2005, 12:25 PM
I have purchased a decent number of milsurp rifles. I would guess somewhere between 20 and 50. I didn't check anything on any of them. I cleaned them and I fired them. No strings, or sandbags: sights, and proper trigger squeeze. Never had even the slightest problem with any of them. I have no intention of doing any checks on them in the future either.

TheEgg
September 21, 2005, 02:37 PM
I have no intention of doing any checks on them in the future either. :what:

Where do you want the flowers and condolences sent?

J/K! :D

To each their own: I sure check them out though. These are decades old military firearms that I have no way of knowing about their maintenance/usage/storage. It simply seems prudent to me to exercise some caution here.

Sam
September 21, 2005, 03:29 PM
I am in the same situation as Shweboner.
I have always checked them and test fired. Those that don't pass get made into something else.

One of our local dealers sold a Moisin-Nagant to a customer last month that was not gone through in any way. He brought the parts to me and asked if I could help him out. Bore obstruction of some kind, probably cosmoline.
Complete wreck. I bought it for $15 and parted it out. made my money back the next day, customer needed a firing pin.

Sam

foghornl
September 21, 2005, 03:37 PM
When I bought my M-44 Mosin-Nagant a couple of years back, I took it to a local shop. Guy checked it with go/no-go gauges, then test-fired a round into his bullet trap and cross-sectioned the empty. All for $25.

Conclusion..head-space was "Generous, but within spec. Blast away all you want." Sectioned case showed no signs of stretching or bulging.

That being said, for my first mag full, I STILL did the 'set it in a tire and use a LONNNNNNG trigger string' method.

Since that is my face & hands next to about a 50,000+PSI quick burst of energy, I'll check-em out thouroughly FIRST. Somehow, being called "one-eye Lefty" just doesn't do it for me.

1 old 0311
September 21, 2005, 03:45 PM
I have shot for over 40 years. ANY gun I shoot is a pucker factor the first round. New, old, civilian, and military.

Kevin

cracked butt
September 21, 2005, 06:50 PM
ANY gun I shoot is a pucker factor the first round. New, old, civilian, and military.

Heck, I feel that way everytime I go to the range and fire the first reload of the day. I'm obsessive compulsive about double, triple, quadruple checking the components going into my loads, but I'm always paranoid that maybe something was wrong with my brain the day I reloaded and I second guess.... :uhoh:

Sleeping Dog
September 21, 2005, 07:00 PM
I've never had one checked, I just look them over. Then throw a towel over the action for the first shot, and wear gloves for the first shot. Just in case something lets go.

The only thing that broke under fire was the forestock on an Ishapore 2A1 .308 Enfield. I think the cosmoline-eating termites got to it. No danger from that wood breaking.

Regards.

Dionysusigma
September 21, 2005, 07:34 PM
I let the guys at the store fire my M44 for me before I took it home. They didn't seem to mind too much. :D

I need to get another... :(

mrmeval
November 6, 2005, 06:44 PM
I've gotten several still packed in cosmoline so they've probably not been fired. Some say they check them for correctness but I'd go over them closely.


I know that every seller of military surplus guns says to have the gun checked by a qualified gunsmith before use, BUT does anyone here really go through the trouble and expense to have that done?

I'd like to believe that someone in the sales channel has checked to see if these guns are an accident waiting to happen.

That said, I've got two VZ24 Mausers with mismatched parts that I'm a little reluctant to fire.

What do you think?

The_Antibubba
November 6, 2005, 11:10 PM
Of course every military gun was tested before it was shipped!



His name was Boris. :eek: :D

Cosmoline
November 6, 2005, 11:12 PM
All my rifles were tested in at least one world war.

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