OOPS, wrong house, sorry


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Devon
October 14, 2005, 02:10 PM
The wife and I talked about what would happen if they broke in our house. Kinda gives you a sick feeling in your gut, nobody wins. Hope they catch the gal that made this call.


http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2005/oct/14/police_911_call_break_wrong_house/?city_local





Police on 911 call break in wrong house
Caller actually dialed from Oklahoma; 80-year-old says officers were rash

By Eric Weslander (Contact)

Friday, October 14, 2005

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It was 3 a.m. when 80-year-old Bernice Kennedy heard the Lawrence Police officers break through her front door.

“It’s a wonder I didn’t have a heart attack,” said Kennedy, who got out of bed in her nightgown and found three officers searching through the home where she lives with her 82-year-old husband, Bernard.

It was all a big mistake.

The officers went to the Kennedy’s home in the 2500 block of Alister Drive early Monday after emergency dispatchers incorrectly told them there was a suicidal woman in the home. The intrusion happened because of a mix of human error and good intentions, officials said later — but the Kennedys said they weren’t satisfied with the answers they’ve heard so far.

“It needs to be corrected somehow,” Bernice Kennedy said. “I hate to think that somebody else would go through this.”

Here’s what happened:

Early Monday morning, dispatchers at the county’s emergency-communications center, 111 E. 11th St., got a call from a distraught woman who asked for information about a suicide-crisis line. The dispatcher kept the woman on the line and began talking with her about her situation.


Photo by Richard Gwin

Bernice and Bernard Kennedy, of Alister Drive, look though their new front door Thursday. The old door was damaged early Monday after Lawrence Police officers forced their way into the Kennedy home about 3 a.m. The officers were responding to a 911 suicide call and entered the wrong dwelling. The right dwelling was actually somewhere in Oklahoma. The Kennedys say the officers did not adequately investigate before barging in, but officials say it was an honest mistake.
The call didn’t come in on the 911 line, so the dispatchers’ computer display didn’t show the number or address from where the woman was calling, said Selma Southard, assistant director of emergency communication.

Instead, the call came in on a nonemergency line and rolled to a four-digit extension within the dispatch center. As the woman described her suicidal intentions, another dispatcher decided it would be a good idea to trace the line to find the origin of the call, Southard said.

But instead of asking the phone company to trace the line — which would have revealed the call was coming from Oklahoma — the dispatcher called directory assistance and asked for a “reverse lookup,” which matches a phone number with an address, Southard said.

By mistake, the dispatcher looked up the Kennedys’ number, which has the same last four digits as the dispatch-center’s extension.

About the time officers arrived at the home, Southard said, the woman in Oklahoma who called for help told dispatchers she’d taken a drug that would kill her in five minutes and that she was sitting in an idling car in her garage.

Bernice Kennedy said officers should have done more investigating before breaking down her door. But Sgt. Dan Ward, a police spokesman, said the officers acted properly in an emergency, given the information they had.

“We forced entry to try to save somebody, but we weren’t at the right place,” Ward said. “We did everything that we thought we needed to do.”

Ward said the officers knocked before forcing their way inside. But Bernice Kennedy said her hearing is fine, and she insists she didn’t hear a sound until her door was broken.

Southard said that after realizing the mistake, the phone company traced the phone call to Oklahoma. She said authorities there are trying to find the woman, and she and Douglas County Administrator Craig Weinaug said they’ve been told the woman has been placing similar calls to other states.


6News video: Lawrence Police break down door by mistake (10-13-05)
Douglas County information on 911 calls
Link to FCC discussion on accidental 911 calls
“What we found out subsequently is that this is a person in Oklahoma who has done this to numerous law-enforcement agencies,” Weinaug said.

The Kennedys said their door was replaced earlier this week and the county has agreed to pay the bill. As of Thursday, the Kennedys didn’t know how much it would cost because they hadn’t received a bill.

Southard said that after the mistake, she reviewed procedures with dispatchers and did extra training to ensure that it wouldn’t happen again. She said she also apologized to one of the Kennedys’ sons.

In Southard’s view, it was a freak accident.

“It’s kind of one of those things that you wouldn’t think would happen that just happened,” she said. “It’s three dispatchers working. It’s busy, and it happened. We wish it hadn’t.”

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50 Freak
October 14, 2005, 02:16 PM
It happens, glad no one got hurt.

But more glad the LE's didn't break into some of our houses.

If I'm woken up at 3 am by a bunch of guys in black assault gear porting machine guns and shining their surefires into my eyes, I'm likely to pick up my bedside AR and start firing at the "home invaders". Definitly a no win situation for both sides.

Deavis
October 14, 2005, 02:22 PM
If I'm woken up at 3 am by a bunch of guys in black assault gear porting machine guns and shining their surefires into my eyes, I'm likely to pick up my bedside AR and start firing at the "home invaders". Definitly a no win situation for both sides

Somehow I doubt the officers who showed up with the intention of stopping a suicide were decked out in full mall ninja apparel ready to lay waste to the scene like a John Wu movie. I could be wrong, but I somehow doubt they had time to mobilize the SWAT team.

I'm not sure I see the logic in saving someone who wants to commit suicide but I guess it really was a call for help in this case :) Bad pun, I know.. ;)

carebear
October 14, 2005, 02:28 PM
Why wouldn't they?

They're responding to a suicide. By definition they are confronting a person who has expressed an intent, willingness and ability to take a human life.

(I was gonna put a smiley, but I'm not sure how I feel about the truth of that statement)

pax
October 14, 2005, 02:32 PM
Obviously a mistake, which could have been tragic but was not.

Sounds like the county has its stuff together: they've figured out exactly how the error happened, they've apologized to the homeowner and agreed to pay for damages, and they aren't in full CYA mode.

Glad there's a happy ending.

pax

Devon
October 14, 2005, 02:47 PM
It certainly could have had a very different turnout. Kudos to the city police and the county for making things right with the folks. I wonder how they are sleeping after all this. If they catch the gal that caused all of this, she should be held liable for damages.

Lupinus
October 14, 2005, 02:49 PM
The police acted accordingly so it isn't their fault, it sounds liek the dispatchers screw up.

Though is it just me or did they not say of the real caller actually died or not? Or did I miss it?

Devon
October 14, 2005, 02:51 PM
Lupinus, the real caller was calling from somewhere in Oklahoma. She allegedly has been making these calls to police departments in several states on the non-emergency lines to avoid being call-traced.

DontBurnMyFlag
October 14, 2005, 03:12 PM
what happens if they break into your house, its dark you cant see and they dont identify themselves as police right away because they cant see anyone to say police too...?

say you open fire, kill em all only later to find out they were cops. Whos in the wrong here?

they broke down the wrong door, didnt identify themselves and it was a low light situation.

I still gaurentee you will be in lockup for a while, if not forever.

Zundfolge
October 14, 2005, 03:13 PM
I love how the newspaper posts a google map to these people's house :rolleyes:

Now every thug that can read in the area knows exactly where to find the helpless old people with a broken front door!

svtruth
October 14, 2005, 03:41 PM
Does anyone else have a problem with the PO saying we were acting on the information we had? Don't they feel any duty to make sure they are acting on good info?

Zundfolge
October 14, 2005, 03:44 PM
Does anyone else have a problem with the PO saying we were acting on the information we had? Don't they feel any duty to make sure they are acting on good info?
I agree that they should make sure they are acting on good info ... however had they sat on their hands and waited for proper confirmation of the address, they could just as well have shown up after the chick offed herself and then people would be whining about how the cops didn't do their job (ala FEMA).

From the cops position its a damned-if-you-do-damned-if-you-don't sort of thing (although I would prefer they "don't")

rmgill
October 14, 2005, 04:09 PM
say you open fire, kill em all only later to find out they were cops. Whos in the wrong here?

The cops, they broke in the wrong house. If I go into the wrong house and get shot by the owner because my behavior makes them think I'm a threat, its my fault. Same thing for cops. They're not super citizens. They just do different things for their jobs.

they broke down the wrong door, didnt identify themselves and it was a low light situation.

I still gaurentee you will be in lockup for a while, if not forever.

Though it depends on the state. I've mentioned the instance before, but we had a citizen shoot a plain clothes cop whom he thought was robbing their store. (stood in the door, no badge, displayed a firearm, yelled for everyone to get on the floor). The citizen was not charged.

The litmus test is, do you fear for your life or someone else's? Can you convince (12) other people such was the case? If yes, then it was probably a justifiable shoot. Cop or not.

Because we know, home invaders never flash fake/stolen badges as part of their drill to get the victims to accede to their demands.

Deavis
October 14, 2005, 05:47 PM
they could just as well have shown up after the chick offed herself and then people would be whining about how the cops didn't do their job

Since there is no legal responsibility for the cops to protect any individual citizen, they couldn't get in trouble for taking it slowly. Of course, it is natural to want ot help someone in an emergency, so you can understand their desire to get in there. In their case, since they have the option of not helping, they could wait it out I guess but if it was a loved one, would you really wnat them to wait? Then again, if you had a close family you could argue that this sort of thing would never happen.

Alex45ACP
October 14, 2005, 07:24 PM
Why are police resources being wasted on things like this?

If someone wants to kill themselves, let them. They're perfectly within their rights to do so. The police can focus on real (non consentual) crimes instead.

Zundfolge
October 14, 2005, 07:39 PM
Since there is no legal responsibility for the cops to protect any individual citizen, they couldn't get in trouble for taking it slowly.

Legal responsibility and "court of public opinion" are two different things ... bad PR can damage a cop's career as much as an indictment.

Cops are going to err on the side that covers their behinds (although they probably didn't consider that they'd be facing down a homeowner's gun).

And to be fair, these cops thought they where going to save a life ... so I could see where they'd put aside any concerns over "rights" in that circumstance.

MikeIsaj
October 14, 2005, 07:43 PM
dont identify themselves as police right away because they cant see anyone to say police too...?
say you open fire, kill em all only later to find out they were cops. Whos in the wrong here?
they broke down the wrong door, didnt identify themselves and it was a low light situation.
I still guarantee you will be in lockup for a while, if not forever.Maybe in the Peoples republic of N.J., but in the USA you would not be in lockup. Police knock on the door and shout "POLICE" If they make entry in a situation like this, they will move through the house shouting "POLICE". If you shoot them in this situation, you will rightfully go to prison for being a dumba**. If they do not continually announce their presence and ID themselves, they are probably not cops and it is reasonable to think they aren't.

All those who say "let 'em die", you have no idea what you are talking about. Most suicides are the result of something other than a true, well thought out, rational will to die. It is no different than helping someone with a physical injury. If a person in an auto accident with a head injury wants to walk out on the highway, would you let them? Know what you are talking about before you say stupid things.

(Rant off)

Hawkmoon
October 14, 2005, 07:43 PM
Add me to the list of people who don't understand why suicide is illegal. If someone wants to end it ... let 'em.

Some years ago I was talking about suicides with a friend who was a psychotherapist. His view was that many, perhaps most, attempted suicides are not cries for help, just cries for attention and relief from responsibility. His approach when someone was sitting in his office, whining about maybe they should just end it all, was "Fine, I'll buy the gun if you promise to use it."

That usually shut them up. Sometimes it even got them back to the subject.

beerslurpy
October 14, 2005, 08:14 PM
I think the police have better things to do than save people from darwin. If someone wants to end themselves, who cares? Just sent a patrol car by a week later to feed the cats and collect the body. If they didnt go through with the suicide, arrest them for filing a false police report.

The police shouldnt be kicking in people's doors to "prevent suicide." Its a dumb idea for the same reason no-knock warrants and "undercover cops waving guns around" is a bad idea.

Old Dog
October 14, 2005, 08:40 PM
So, Beerslurpy, if it's your mentally-ill family member involved, you'd rather they just kill themself rather than end up getting treatment and going on to live a normal life?

Standing Wolf
October 14, 2005, 09:56 PM
I think the crux of the matter is kicking down doors. I have a hunch an awful lot of cops enjoy kicking down doors.

MachIVshooter
October 14, 2005, 10:04 PM
Maybe in the Peoples republic of N.J., but in the USA you would not be in lockup. Police knock on the door and shout "POLICE" If they make entry in a situation like this, they will move through the house shouting "POLICE". If you shoot them in this situation, you will rightfully go to prison for being a dumba**. If they do not continually announce their presence and ID themselves, they are probably not cops and it is reasonable to think they aren't.


Just announcing that they are police is not good enough. In my house, they are going to have to prove that they are actually the police or there will be a standoff. Now if I see a half-dozen cruisers outside, that would convince me. But two or three guys dressed in uniform saying they are the police is not enough for me to drop my gaurd and surrender. Too many impersonators, often times more than one coordinating. I have to be able to see resources that exceed the capability of a couple brazen criminals to buy it.

Now in the event described in the article, there most definitely would have been a firefight in my home. Sneaking around in someone's house at 3 am is a real good way to get shot. I am of the opinion that an intruders intentions are irrelevant; if they have broken into my home while it is occupied, they are there to harm me or my wife and I will shoot first and ask questions later. Everyone knows the risks of B&E into an occupied dwelling, and if they are willing to assume those risks they deserve to be shot.

Old Dog
October 14, 2005, 10:18 PM
Just announcing that they are police is not good enough
So, you'll shoot first and check credentials later? I'm with MikeIsaj on this one; I've no doubt in this situation there were at least two patrol cars, lights flashing in front of the house, and the officers made sufficient commotion to wake all but an 80-year-old woman who may not have been sleeping with her hearing aid in (like my mother in law does, nothing short of a thermonuclear blast will wake her). And some of you are speaking as though these mistaken entries are commonplace ... seems as though many believe they are, but they seem to be sufficiently rare enough that it makes the national news every time one happens. Having law enforcement enter my house in the middle of the night unannounced is, frankly, about the last thing in the world I worry about ...

Flyboy
October 14, 2005, 10:27 PM
So, Beerslurpy, if it's your mentally-ill family member involved, you'd rather they just kill themself rather than end up getting treatment and going on to live a normal life?
I'm not Beerslurpy, but I'll answer.

I've been in the situation you describe: a family member (my brother) tried to kill himself. Ruger Single Six; I still have the gun (one of my favorites, in fact). Dad happened to walk in on him in time to stop him.

Am I glad dad stopped him? You're damned right I am. I love my brother, and I'd be heartbroken if anything happened to him. Just so we're clear.

However, I don't believe the police have the right to break down the door to stop him. Yes, I'd rather he live, but that doesn't make it the state's business. I'd rather he not take drugs, drink, or smoke, but I don't think it's the state's business on any of those, either. Ditto with swearing, dishonesty, sleeping around, and failing to do his homework. I don't know which, of any, of those he does, but I don't think the state has any interest in any of them, so long as he doesn't infringe upon the rights of others.

Does that make sense?

Old Dog
October 14, 2005, 10:38 PM
Flyboy, the underlying issue here is that the police believed someone called them for help -- from that house ... If an apparently suicidal person calls 911, crying out for one last person to demonstrate that someone cares before that person takes their life, does government simply ignore the call? It's not the state's job ...

joab
October 14, 2005, 11:26 PM
what happens if they break into your house, its dark you cant see and they dont identify themselves as police right away because they cant see anyone to say police too

I know this one, I've been in this exact situation

20 years ago I was going through a nonamicable divorce. My wife called an anonymous hot line to report that I was trying to commit suicide, they called the police.
When the police came there was no doubt who they were, they pounded on the door, which I ignored until they came in shouting "Police, is everybody OK"?
I was disoriented, as my wife knew I would be because I was on pain meds for a dislocated shoulder, but I had no doubt who was in my house.


In this case
I suspect that the door may have been forced but I doubt that it was destroyed with their big universal key.
I also have no doubt that they came in calling out to anybody that may have been in the house.

A mistake was made in an effort to save a life, an apology and restitution was made.
I guess the police chief could write a formal apology in the blood of the offending officers, but I doubt that that would even be enough

beerslurpy
October 14, 2005, 11:44 PM
So, Beerslurpy, if it's your mentally-ill family member involved, you'd rather they just kill themself rather than end up getting treatment and going on to live a normal life?

My parents didnt raise us that way, but if one of us decides to violate common sense and get ourselves killed, it isnt my place to stop them, anymore than it is my parents place to tell me I cant drive fast at Sebring or own guns.

If I cant override the foolish wishes of my relatives, what makes you think you or any other cop has that right?

If they open a dialog with me, I'll try and talk them out of it, but I am against coercion, even for the good of the person you are coercing. As long as they are an adult, I think they are most fit to determine what is in their best interests.

Flyboy
October 15, 2005, 12:01 AM
OldDog:
Flyboy, the underlying issue here is that the police believed someone called them for help -- from that house ... If an apparently suicidal person calls 911, crying out for one last person to demonstrate that someone cares before that person takes their life, does government simply ignore the call? It's not the state's job ...
A. Yes. I agree that it's not the state's job. The state does not exist to protect me from myself. I cannot infringe upon my own rights, by definition.
B. I'm not necessarily opposed to the police officers (the state) knocking on the door and asking for permission to enter, but forcing entry is out of the question. The former is a request for permission: it is voluntary, and gives me the opportunity to say no. The latter is the use of force, and gives me no opportunity to refuse permission. That's the critical difference: permission, versus the use of force.
C. Due diligence. The 911 dispatcher had the means at his disposal to verify the address, and chose not to use it. Even if the (nominal) victim had been honestly looking for help, he could have dispatched emergency services and then verified the address without jeopardizing the response. I maintain that he should have done so, and should have notified the responding officers upon finding a discrepancy. He didn't.

To take the second point further, what if the police break in, and ask me if I really want to shuffle off this mortal coil, and I say yes? Should they have the authority and power to deny me my will?

MechAg94
October 15, 2005, 12:07 AM
To me it seems that the officers broke down the door a little quick. It seems that if the residents woke up when the door was broke down, they didn't bang on the door or make much of an effort to wake up anyone inside.

I know the LEO's heart was in the right place, but I don't think "trying to save a life" trumps all other concerns or gives them the right to break doors down without taking reasonable actions to avoid it first. If it was so important to get there fast to save a life, drive up with sirens blaring and bang on the door. You are sure to wake up any residents that way and it will be obvious who you are.

MachIVshooter
October 15, 2005, 01:03 AM
So, you'll shoot first and check credentials later? I'm with MikeIsaj on this one; I've no doubt in this situation there were at least two patrol cars, lights flashing in front of the house, and the officers made sufficient commotion to wake all but an 80-year-old woman who may not have been sleeping with her hearing aid in (like my mother in law does, nothing short of a thermonuclear blast will wake her). And some of you are speaking as though these mistaken entries are commonplace ... seems as though many believe they are, but they seem to be sufficiently rare enough that it makes the national news every time one happens. Having law enforcement enter my house in the middle of the night unannounced is, frankly, about the last thing in the world I worry about ...

Last week in Boulder a young male dressed as a police officer beat on the door of a couple's home, screaming "police-open up!". When they did, he forced his way in and assaulted them with a knife. Fortunately, they were able to wrestle the weapon away and wound up killing him with it. But it could have easily gone south for the couple (especially the woman if her husband had not been home).

So yes, I'll worry about who, what and why later-once I have assured our safety. My survival and that of my wife in our own home is paramount. All other concerns are secondary by an prodigious margin.

To be fair, however, if they have announced that they are police officers, I will alert them to the fact that I am armed and skeptical/fearful of their presence, and give them a chance to prove that they are in fact police officers with a bona-fide reason for occupying my home. A trained officer would, at this point, stop where he's at and evaluate the stuation and try to be reasonable. If they advance once they have been made aware of the repercussions, all bets are off.

joab
October 15, 2005, 02:18 AM
they didn't bang on the door or make much of an effort to wake up anyone insideThe police claim they did.
My experience with police is that they usually bang on doors and announce their presence in situations like these.

My experience with oldsters answering doors, which is extensive, is that they usually don't do it very quickly and usually sleep a lot sounder than they claim to.
They also tend to think that anyone more than 20 years younger than they are is a complete idiot, unless they are an idiot grandchild

patrol120
October 15, 2005, 02:32 AM
I don't think "trying to save a life" trumps all other concerns or gives them the right to break doors down without taking reasonable actions to avoid it first

The courts feel otherwise. We, as police officers, have the legal right to force entry into a residence under "exigent circumstances"..a suicidal 911 call definitely qualifies. Mistakes are made, and the courts know this, but they still staunchly defend our ability to make every effort to save a life.

MachIVshooter
October 15, 2005, 06:41 PM
The courts feel otherwise. We, as police officers, have the legal right to force entry into a residence under "exigent circumstances"...

And as an American you have the right to walk up to any person or group of people and say just about anything you want to them. Does not mean it is a good idea.

Most anyone will feel threatened when a person breaks down the door to their home, so you can expect just about anything. Why you are there is likely not their immediate concern. This is where good judgement (or lack thereof) comes into play.

The courts supporting your actions won't do you much good if your actions got you killed by a frightened homeowner you intruded upon. It certainly won't be much comfort to the family members you left behind.

I am not an LEO, but I would have to imagine most agencies emplore that you make forced entry only as a last resort, out of concern for safety of both officers and occupants.

We are not talking about a raid or breeching into a hostage situation. We are talking about invading peoples homes under the presumption that there is a problem. Better be damn sure that a problem requiring you presence exists first.

I can promise that, as I sit here on my computer, If my door is broken down I will pick up the gun that is sitting next to the monitor and shoot whoever pops around the corner. If they announce that they are police, etc, they are still going to have to be patient while I deicide that I am not in danger and put down my weapon of my own accord. If they were to fire on me first, all hell would break loose.

A persons home is more than just wood, concrete and drywall. It is a sanctuary. A place that should be safe. In most states, we are given the right to assure our safety within our own home using deadly force. It would behoove a gung-ho police officer to remember that a homeowner need only believe they are in danger to use deadly force on an intruder.

50 Freak
October 16, 2005, 06:08 AM
I would guess a homeowner that accidently shot a LE kicking down the door and coming in unannouced at 3am could just claim he was in fear of his safety.

Seems to work quite well for the police every time they accidently shoot a citizen with a candy wrapper in his hand.

Devon
October 17, 2005, 02:29 PM
I didn't intend this to be a cop bashing thread. I was thinking more along the lines of; what if it happened to my family, how would we respond to the door coming down? I believe the LEO's did the right thing, acting on poor information, maybe, but with the best interest of the community in mind. That's all we can really expect anyway, isn't it? Apparently the dispatch center has learned some lessons and is changing some protocols concerning call tracing.
Basically what I wanted to relate was; it can and does happen. What can we do to prevent unnecessary violence on our part. Part of our new plan is to go immediately to our office and look out the window to see what cars are in our driveway and the street. We live on end of a culdesac, with no other entrances or exits and a clear view of the street for 100+ yards. The office is directly across the hall from our bedroom with a very defensible hallway leading to it, basically a dead zone to anyone coming down the hall we don't want there.

Devon

Beren
October 17, 2005, 02:58 PM
I don't see that anything improper occured. The police had good cause to force entry. They reportedly did so in a responsible manner. Upon realizing their mistake, the department has apologized and offered appropriate restitution.

So what's the big deal?

MechAg94
October 17, 2005, 03:59 PM
I don't have a real big problem with what the police did, I just think they need to understand that they could be walking into to a dangerous situation. Especially if they do not make a good effort to identify themselves. I assume they would have a car outside with flashing lights. That would help as well as announcing themselves repeatedly.

On the other hand, as a homeowner, I think this underscores the need to challenge an intruder before firing especially if you can't see them or if you can do it without putting yourself in additional danger.

I have heard of officers going to the wrong address on a warranted search. It doesn't happen very often at all, but it has happened.

Otherguy Overby
October 17, 2005, 05:30 PM
In a far distant galaxy, citizens were sovereign. There was a presumption of innocence.

Here's the deal: ANY time law enforcement breaks into the wrong house, they, and their agencies, should be FULLY liable for their actions and also the subsequent reactions of citizens. Citizen victims should NOT be liable for any claims both criminal and civil for actions in defense. Break in the wrong house, a citizen is killed or kills officer(s) and surviving perp cops should be up on murder charges. Maybe their chief, too.

IOW, if LEOs break into the wrong house, it should be legal open season on them with no limit and no recourse. It's for MY children, and me going back to bed.

The act of being a JBT should have both legal, social and Darwinian hazards.

In a free country, "it was for your, our or their safety" should not be a valid law enforcement excuse for kicking in a door. Emergency people yes, but LEO's no.

patrol120
October 17, 2005, 06:41 PM
Emergency People? What the hell do you consider Law Enforcement? I can guarantee you that Cops do nearly as much CPR and emergency First Aid as many firefighters do. In my short career of ~2 years, I have done banafide CPR 3 times, delivered a baby in the front seat of a minivan, and done C-spine stabilization more times thatn I can count, all before the "emergency people" showed up. Police are the true "first reponders", as when the call comes out, we are already rolling.

Personally, I would hate to break into the wrong house. However, the cops did not force entry into the wrong residence, it was the one they were supposed to. All we have to go on is what we are dispatched to. If I got that call, Id have done the same thing, and I have. Last itme I got this kind of call, I had to kick in the barricaded door of a reportedly suicidal male, only to find said male swinging from a nylon rope in the closet.

There was a greivous mistake made in the system, but it was not on the part of the responding officers.



By the way, if the cops show up in front of your residence on reports of a suicidal individual, there will be no "marked units with lights and sirens. Thas Copwork 101. Its been proven time and time again that code 3 responses only escalate such incidents.

IZinterrogator
October 17, 2005, 06:57 PM
IOW, if LEOs break into the wrong house, it should be legal open season on them with no limit and no recourse. It's for MY children, and me going back to bed.What the hell does that mean, no limit? Are you going to be shooting at the responding officers as they pull up when the "officer down" call goes out? I'm with patrol120 on this one, police are emergency workers (with extensive training in certain types of emergencies and basic training in other types). You are way out of line to talk about them as if they are game. :fire:

pax
October 17, 2005, 06:59 PM
Well, that's about enough of that. Once it's down to Us Vs. Them -- and threats of violence -- the thread is done.

pax

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