What is the best class of gun to start shooting on?


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natedog
October 14, 2005, 08:42 PM
If you were introduce a new shooter to firearms, which platform is preferable? Rifle, shotgun, or handgun?

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Chupacabra
October 14, 2005, 08:49 PM
If you were introduce a new shooter to firearms, which platform is preferable? Rifle, shotgun, or handgun?

Handgun or Rifle in 22LR. Cheap, fun, and easy to shoot!

A shotgun might be a bit much for a first time shooter.

jobu07
October 14, 2005, 08:53 PM
.22 rifle I say.

Guido
October 14, 2005, 09:03 PM
Gotta agree with the .22. The shotgun or hand gun is going to be more expensive to shoot and they will learn the basics of shooting better with the rifle.

Daniel964
October 14, 2005, 09:04 PM
.22 rifle I say.

+1

MachIVshooter
October 14, 2005, 09:37 PM
.22 Rifle. It is certainly the safest way to start. Many new shooters get nervous and, no matter how much you've drilled safety into them, muzzles can cover things they shouldn't. It is much less likely that a long gun will be swung around on non-targets than a handgun, and with a .22 rifle you minimize collateral damage in the event of a ND. Once safety becomes second nature to the student, then graduate to rimfire handguns. After that, it simply depends on their comfort level.

It took me some time to get my wife from .22 to 9mm, but now she shoots .45 and 10mm fairly well. We're still working on centerfire rifles. So far, only up to the 6mm. Once I get her to .280 I'll be content.

Good luck!

Lupinus
October 14, 2005, 09:44 PM
First gun I ever fired wasa.410 shotgun.

Course, shotgun's arn't the best to teach a kid accuracy and the like. But the opperation is easy and good to teach rule's with.

Though I still think a .22 is a great first time weapon with the softer recoil. The advantage of a shotgun though is that if the miss....wildly because accident's do happen even when you are increadably safty minded. A rifle travels and even .22LR can hurt someone seriously. A .410 can seriously hurt someone as well of course, but it doesn't have the same carrying range as a rifle.

Preacherman
October 14, 2005, 09:45 PM
Another vote for .22 rifle, followed by a .22 handgun once they've mastered the basics of use of iron sights, etc. Minimal recoil, cheap ammo, and the same safety requirements as "larger" weapons.

However, for some shooters who've been a bit too "macho" to want to start with a lowly .22, I've used a .357 Magnum revolver or carbine firing .38 Special ammo. The weight of the gun absorbs much of the recoil, so that although it's heavier than a rimfire, it's manageable.

HSMITH
October 14, 2005, 10:14 PM
I say learn on a shotgun. Learning to aim is easy, learning NOT to aim is another story all together.

CB900F
October 14, 2005, 10:51 PM
Fella's;

Another vote for the .22 rimfire rifle.

900F

Declaration Day
October 14, 2005, 10:57 PM
I'll vote for a .22 rifle. In addition to all of the above reasons, a new shooter is more likely to hit a target with a .22.

I've taken new shooters to the range and started them with larger calibers, and they often got frustrated because they couldn't hit anything. Safety is #1 of course, but you want your student to have fun so they'll want to come back.

marklbucla
October 14, 2005, 11:57 PM
Every weekend, I've seen guys take their girlfriends to the range and give them a .40, .45, or even a 9mm and that's just flat out wrong. Way more often than not, they get that supposed deer in the headlights look and just seem terrified of the gun.

.22LR seems to be the only way to go for a first timer.

DMK
October 15, 2005, 12:06 AM
I say 22LR too. It's probably what most of us started with. Actually, I started with an air rifle, then a 22 rifle.

Whether to use a rifle or pistol depends on why they want to learn and what they plan to shoot. A rifle is probably easier to get proficient with and would be best to get started with target shooting, but most folks seem to prefer a pistol for self defense.

Cosmoline
October 15, 2005, 12:13 AM
The .22 rifle is better than the handgun both from a safety point of view and because the shooter can start getting good groups at fifty yards in a day. I've found it far easier to deal with newbie shooters when they're using rifles. With short guns they tend to grab them and start pointing them in bad directions in spite of the safety directions, which causes me to yell and gets everything off to a bad start.

Moparmike
October 15, 2005, 01:50 AM
.22lr? Bah. Start with something more substantial...like a .700 Nitro Express. :evil:

lycanthrope
October 15, 2005, 02:07 AM
All of them. You don't know a shooter's strength until you test them. No one likes to work onthe weaknesses until they feel proficient in at least one area.....it hurts the ego too much.

I feel Rifle and shotgun have an even playong field. One you point and the other you aim. Pistols are generally harder to master.

On another note, I find it strange that the master shotgunners point and the master pistol shoooters learn to watch sights at full speed. A lot of shotgunners would scoff at the determination that USPSA shoooters use to learn to see the front sight in focus on a moving target. I tend to wonder if certain types of people are drawn to each sport depending on skill/biological factors.

280PLUS
October 15, 2005, 08:05 AM
I agree with .22 rifle. single shot or bolt action though. Teaches them to make each shot count.

Koobuh
October 15, 2005, 08:51 AM
This is something I've put some thought into, since a coworker has asked me to teach her how to shoot. I'm planning on starting her with lots of dry firing on all three, .22 CB and standard in a rifle, .22 CB from a converter in my shotgun, hollowcore from my Mosin Nagant M44, and finally a few rounds of .45 from my 1911 knockoff.
The point of the ramp-up in recoil and muzzle blast of course being to keep her from getting overwhelmed right off the bat and start flinching before pulling the trigger. More dry firing to follow after the full power rounds.

I have enough trouble flinching as it is, I'd rather she not learn that the same way I did- at the back of an M44 firing heavy ball. :uhoh:

Silent-Snail
October 15, 2005, 09:02 AM
Avoid starting on a shotgun. I still flinch:(

rms/pa
October 15, 2005, 09:05 AM
another vote for a .22 rifle,

preferably single shot bolt action, tack driver. sight picture is every thing at discharge. little room for oopsies if you keep the ammo in your pocket and give them out one at a time.

of course i could be braying out my mouth.

rms/pa

HSMITH
October 15, 2005, 09:32 AM
"On another note, I find it strange that the master shotgunners point and the master pistol shoooters learn to watch sights at full speed. A lot of shotgunners would scoff at the determination that USPSA shoooters use to learn to see the front sight in focus on a moving target. I tend to wonder if certain types of people are drawn to each sport depending on skill/biological factors."

I am a USPSA newby and still staggering recovering shotgunaholic, but I agree that although VERY similar they are different. In my estimation the shotgunner is in full focus on a moving target that they intend to shoot with the sight/shotgun in peripheral focus, the USPSA shooter (once he/she learns to watch the sights) is also focusing on a moving target that is the front sight with the target in peripheral focus. The point of focus is reversed.

Back to the original question. I started on rifles, moved to handguns, the complete and total frustration of shotgunning hooked me. I could aim with anything but learning to point a shotgun was almost impossible. Aiming is a much simpler and methodical task, I think it would be far easier to learn after learing to point a shotgun and actually hit things. I also think being able to point a shotgun leads to being a much better field gunner with a rifle and a pistol. My kids will start on shotguns adequately sized and loaded, so the flinch mentioned won't be an issue nor will be an ill fitted gun.

Oldtimer
October 15, 2005, 09:46 AM
The single-shot or bolt-action .22 rifle is, without a doubt, the best starter firearm. It is easily adapted to by new shooters, is an excellent "hands-on" firearm during the initial stages of training, and is a bit safer than auto-loading .22 rifles. Excellent firearm for learning such things as sight radius, sight picture, proper breathing, proper hold/grip, and maintenance procedures. It also allows the new shooter to achieve better accuracy (my opinion), which is definitely a confidence builder.

Many competitive shooters "warm-up" with .22 firearms before getting to their serious matches.

Overall, they are "more bang for the buck", and while most new shooters want to "spray" with .22 auto-loading rifles, accuracy is much easier to achieve if it's done in a methodical way, and with trigger SQUEEZE, not rapid-fire PULLING of the trigger.

Lastly, I still have my very first firearm....a Winchester model 69-A, which is a bolt-action .22LR rifle with a 5-round detachable mag. Since I'm now 59 years old, and it was presented to me on my 6th birthday, it is now 53 years old....but STILL looks fresh, STILL as accurate as it was when it was new, and has greatly increased in its re-sale value (I still have the original bill of sale, showing that it cost $14 back in 1952. Today, it is "priceless"
.....at least to me!)

AirForceShooter
October 15, 2005, 10:37 AM
bolt .22.
Funny part is a new shooter will still have it 50 years later and the grand kids haven't a chance of getting it until Gramps dies.
I still have mine and i still shoot it, a lot

AFS

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