HELP!--ID this 7.62x39


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A Cleaner
October 19, 2005, 11:37 AM
Backstory:

I purchased a case of this 7.62x39 at a gun show. It was advertised as Portuguese, non-corrosive. Upon doing some initial homework I thought I had my bases covered. It wasn't until later that I found some other info that put doubt in my head.

I have searched other gun boards as well as this one. It would be nice to know the origin but my real goal is to determine for certain whether it is corrosive or non-corrosive. Please don't just say, "Clean your gun as if it were corrosive and just shoot it." I will do that either way, I just want to establish if this dealer I purchased from is on the up-and-up.

Description:

The ammo is brass cased and the headstamp, as seen in attached photo, has 7.62x39 on top and 95 on bottom. There are also three equidistant square crimp marks around primer. The stamping is somewhat faint especially on the 7.62x39. The top of the 7 is barely visible even to the naked eye, so it's not just the photo.

Questions:

1. Where could it be from based on the headstamp/appearance?
2. Is it corrosive or non-corrosive?
3. Are there any tests one can conduct to determine corrosive status if appearance alone will not allow for clear determination.

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Jim Watson
October 19, 2005, 12:24 PM
1. I don't know. It is apparently what I call "fake surplus" made up for sale to credulous Americans. Military ammo is seldom marked for caliber, they know what they issue.
2. I don't know.
3. The usual recommended method is to pull a bullet, dump the powder, pop the primer with the muzzle aimed at a piece of degreased mild steel - one source said to use a cheap putty knife. Clean rifle with aqueous solvent as though corrosive. Leave sample steel exposed and watch for rust in the primer flash stain.

Reed1911
October 19, 2005, 02:07 PM
Considering the shape it is in in the picture and the 95 headstamp I would guess that it is non-corrosive. Usually the two digit code is the year of manufacture.

jonnyc
October 19, 2005, 10:02 PM
It was made in Iran, in 1994 and 95. Latest info is that it was surplused or confiscated out of Kosovo or Bosnia. I have seen it sold as Portuguese, Belgian, European, etc., but it isn't. Not sure, but I think it is NC. It is pretty reliable, but not considered to be very accurate. Wolf and the new Hungarian surplus are still cheaper.

jonnyc
October 19, 2005, 10:04 PM
It was made in Iran, in 1994 and 95. Latest info is that it was surplused or confiscated out of Kosovo or Bosnia. I have seen it sold as Portuguese, Belgian, European, etc., but it isn't. Not sure, but I think it is NC. It is pretty reliable, but not considered to be very accurate. Wolf and the new Hungarian surplus are still cheaper.

garrett1955
October 19, 2005, 10:05 PM
humm i see its brass, looks like some olympic fmj stuff i have. but i dont know with that green tinge aroung the primer..

MaMa PyCb
October 20, 2005, 12:19 AM
I would always clean your weapon like its carrosive, that sovles your delema. Use windex down the barrel after shooting at the range, and then clean like you normally would at home, every time you shoot.:D

A Cleaner
October 20, 2005, 10:38 AM
If I cannot get a clear determination of C/NC status, I guess I'll have to do the corrosion test. In addition to the original questions, here's one more.

4. Can you list a few currently obtainable rounds that are known corrosives?

As you can all probably tell, I'm new to rifles so all your help is very much appreciated. Take care and keep 'em comin'.

TrafficMan
October 20, 2005, 11:49 AM
interesting.

i purchased a 200 round battle pack of the same stuff a few months back...advertised as portugeuse and "non magnetic, non corrosive"

turns out that it is magnetic, not sure about the corrosive part....

since i can't use it at any local ranges here in SOCAL (since it's magnetic) it's my SHTF/Bug Out Ammo.

A Cleaner
October 21, 2005, 01:32 PM
Pulled a couple bullets. Both new Wolf with polymer case coating and the ammo at the center of this thread's inquiry are magnetic. Don't that's news to anyone, just thought I'd share. Does it mean there's a steel insert or just the composition of the jacket?

So far, for the corrosion test, I have this:

POSITIVE CONTROL: NEED
NEGATIVE CONTROL: wolf
TEST CONTROL: ammo I bought
CONTROL: piece of clean carbon steel

Any more insight that could help prevent the necessity of the test would be appreciated. If not, anyone have suggestions for a "known corrosive" round? Thanks.

LooseGrouper
October 21, 2005, 01:53 PM
Sorry, I'm not very informed on c vs. nc. Just don't forget to clean the rifle between firing control and dependent variables.

I wanted to ask, what does "magnetic" mean. Does it refer to the case or the projectile? Or maybe the powder or primer? Sorry to be going off on an tanget on your thread, Cleaner.

LG

TrafficMan
October 21, 2005, 05:12 PM
magnetic refers to the projectile.

on most (not all) public Southern California ranges magnetic ammo is a frowned upon, because of the fire hazard. the logic is that it can strike a rock, create a spark and touch off a brush fire. sounds silly, but it HAS happened....considering the land here is very rocky with a lot of dry grass/chapparal.

in a nutshell, if the bullet sticks to a magnet (not the casing) it's a no-no. usually if it does, it means that the bullet has a steel core or some other compound in the jacketing that makes it magnetic. it certainly is a pain in the azz finding ammo, espescially in 7.62x39 that doesn't stick to a magnet. apparently some of the Yugo surplus is fine as well as the Wolf ammo in the YELLOW box...which is copper jacketed.

DMK
October 21, 2005, 08:11 PM
Does it mean there's a steel insert or just the composition of the jacket? I guess steel is either easier to find or cheaper than copper and lead in the Warsaw Pact nations. Along with the very frequent steel case, often times bullets from those regions use a mild steel core under copper (where most US and NATO ammo has a lead core under copper). Sometimes it's either a steel shell over lead or almost entirely a mild steel bullet with a very thin copper coating called "copper washed".

This steel is very soft. It's not AP ammo by any means.

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