Looking for a high speed chronograph


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FullEffect1911
November 7, 2005, 11:25 AM
I am looking to get a chronograph that is capable of measuring a steel .22 cal projectile moving at speeds of about 4500 fps possibly up to 5000 fps. The unit has to be capable of being used indoors and preferably plugs into the wall, not battery powered.

If anyone knows any good chronos that will fall under these criteria. I would very much like to hear about them.

Thanks FE1911

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Zak Smith
November 7, 2005, 11:38 AM
Call Oehler Research and see if they can help you.
http://www.oehler-research.com/

model 649
November 7, 2005, 11:51 AM
Yup, get in touch with Oehler. My 35P will do 4000fps+ per the manual. The only trouble I can see here is that indoors, the lighting isn't usually good enough for the sensors to see the bullet pass. Maybe they have a lit set-up?
Josh

AnthonyRSS
November 7, 2005, 12:17 PM
I think all of the Chronys will measure up to 700fps. I also think they are all battery powered, but I don't know why you would mind.

FullEffect1911
November 7, 2005, 12:28 PM
this particular chronograph is going to be used in an indoor ballistic lab for work. They have been looking for a unit that will measure 2 grain steel fragments up to 5000 fps, for testing. Come to think of it they are much small then .22 cal, but i don't have the measurement off the top of my head.

On a day to day basis, batterys will become a pita.

Rockstar
November 7, 2005, 05:44 PM
Or, he could get the Shooting Chrony F1 that also records to 7000fps. It's on sale @ $69.95.

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=531741

wrangler5
November 7, 2005, 06:43 PM
Or, he could get the Shooting Chrony F1 that also records to 7000fps. It's on sale @ $69.95.

Shooting Chronys do offer a lighted skyscreen accessory which would take care of the indoor light problem. They run on a standard 9v battery that plugs into the usual snap-on cap that attaches to the terminals on the battery, and connects to the unit with red and black wires. For a laboratory setup it should be no trick to get a wall-powered 9v power supply and rig up a connection to those red and black wires.

If you investigate Chronys, consider the Master version of whatever one you are looking at. For not much more money you move the brains out of the main sensor box into a little box that can sit on the shooting bench (connected to the sensors with a standard telephone cable.) If you end up putting a projectile through the sensors you only have to replace those electronics, not the whole thing.

FullEffect1911
November 7, 2005, 07:15 PM
i contacted Oehler thru email and will see what they say. The biggest problem that i see is that the fastest projectile shot will be a .112 cal steel frag moving at about 4500 +. Most chronys say they will go down to only .17 cal. We'll see what they say about this.

griz
November 8, 2005, 03:36 PM
2 grains of steel? That's a very small chunk. In trying to reduce false triggers the makers may have gone for sensitivities that would not pick up something that small. But I don't know, a .177" pellet is the smallest thing I have clocked.

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