How to clean , Lubricate a revolver?


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efeng9622
November 20, 2005, 06:17 PM
Hi!
I just bought a Smith & Wesson Model 67 revolver. I know how to clean,Lubricate the Pistol and Rifle, but for revolver this is first time.
I need to know where I have to Disassemble it. I really appreiciatae if someone can tell me something about that.

Thanks!

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Vern Humphrey
November 20, 2005, 06:30 PM
My advice is don't disassemble it at all -- except perhaps to remove the grips.

Your biggest problem will be with fouling build up in the cylinder throats, under the topstrap just above the breech, and in the bore. You can see all these, and scrubbing with a brush dipped in solvent, followed with a patch, then a good gun oil is enough.

After scrubbing, raise the ejector star and clean under there with a lightly moistened patch.

For guns that have been exposed to extreme conditions, I take the grips off and squirt brake cleaner into the innards and let drain, then follow up with a drop or two of good gun oil administered in the hammer and trigger slots, plus a drop or so on the crane.

SJshooter
November 20, 2005, 06:51 PM
Here's two websites that do an okay job of laying out a basic revolver cleaning routine. Others will have their preferences for brands and products (for example, I use FP-10 for everything, and nothing else, works great: http://www.fp10.com) or routine, but this is a good starting point. Only thing I would add is if you have a blue gun to avoid the first routine's use of an external brass brush and use the nylon instead:

http://attrition.org/technical/firearms/357clean/

http://www.geocities.com/kemays/cleanrev.html

JJpdxpinkpistols
November 22, 2005, 01:01 PM
Hi!
I just bought a Smith & Wesson Model 67 revolver. I know how to clean,Lubricate the Pistol and Rifle, but for revolver this is first time.
I need to know where I have to Disassemble it. I really appreiciatae if someone can tell me something about that.

Thanks!


Don't bother with removing anything but the grips, and even then, only about every 6 months or when the revolver took a beating in the elements. After 6 months of carrying, it makes sense to open the grips, and wipe the area clean. I actually found some lint in mine...dunno how lint got inside, but was just a bit of pocket fuzz.

Hint: I wet the barrel with CLP and then let it sit around for a while in a plastic bag. 1/2 hour or so. long enough to stow the ammo (kids around--don't wanna have kids messing with the ammo in the same room we are cleaning guns), wash my hands, find a pair of rubber gloves, and get a cuppa coffee poured.

See...any time you start removing bolts and screws and plates, and such, you weaken the screw and or mounting for that screw. the more you do it, the weaker it will get until one day, many years down the road, you pull the trigger and the thing goes BANG, but a screw falls out. That could be bad.

Where the ejector rod spins the cylinder gets dirty pretty easy...just put some CLP in there, spin it around a bit, let it soak, then hold a qtip up against the joint and spin it some more.

the rest of it is covered by just about every link posted here.

patrol120
November 22, 2005, 01:41 PM
Call me weird, but I pull the sideplate every time I clean My Smiths. Habit, I gues, as that is what my dad always did. I have never, ever seen a sideplate screw fail from being screwed and unscrewed too many times.

RON in PA
November 22, 2005, 02:35 PM
Older Smith and Wesson manuals advised against any disassembly and in fact stated that one of the advantages of the revolver was that they did not require it.

molonlabe
November 22, 2005, 02:40 PM
I do it once every couple of years. Sideplate cylinder the works. S&W has reverse threads on the cylinder ejector. I get a lot of crud out of it after a couple of years of shooting. (to the point it will not spin freely)

lyricsdad
November 22, 2005, 04:37 PM
Yeah first time I had to clean a revolver.. talk about lots and lots of scrubbing! especially if you have a .357 and are running some .38s through it.. I may not do that that much, man its a chore cleaning the shell chambers.. shooting it was fun, which made it very worth it.. I then put some rem oil dabs on the parts that move, wiped all the access.. and final rub down with an oily patch and put her away.

revolvers seem harder to clean that autoloaders.

efeng9622
November 22, 2005, 09:01 PM
I have two questions,
1) I got the follow message from an article about how to clean and lubricate revolver,
"It's probably best to resist the urge to dribble oil into the frame
via the hammer and trigger slots. The oil will invariably leak
out at some future point, and an encounter with a sandy
environment will turn the inner workings into a gritty sludge
that will do the gun no good."
I don't know what it said is correct or not but I got other message said I should put some oil in hammer and trigger slot. Should I do it or don't do it?
2) I unscrewed 3 screws from my sideplate, but I couldn't pull the sideplate, I don't know why?

RON in PA
November 23, 2005, 03:27 AM
Smith and Wesson advises a drop or two of oil on the hammer so that it runs into the action.

To take off the sideplate after the grips and the plate screws are removed (only use a properly fitting screwdriver) hit the frame with a wooden hammer handle or plastic headed hammer. This will spring the plate. NEVER PRY THE SIDEPLATE.

ChristopherG
November 23, 2005, 05:49 AM
Unless you have a very high mechanical aptitude, getting under the sideplate without specific guidance from a pro is a good way to end up making an embarrassing trip to a gunsmith with a box of tiny parts instead of a gun. If you really want to learn the works of your gun, I recommend the Jerry Miculek trigger job video (google it, you'll find it). He'll lead you step by step through dissassembly and reassembly in the process of polishing the internals of your S&W.

Unless you're gonna do that, you've got basically no business under the sideplate. A moderate course of action, which does make the revolver a bit easier to clean thoroughly, is to remove only the front (toward the barrel end) of the three sideplate screws. This will allow you to slide out the crane on which the cylinder rotates (slide it out from both the frame and the cylinder), so you can get more easily into both the cylinder and the frame window for cleaning.

Mad Chemist
November 23, 2005, 06:12 AM
If the revolver is blued and you carry it often, then remove the grips every time you clean it. Sweat is very corrosive. If you don't carry it then this isn't necessary.

efeng9622
November 23, 2005, 10:22 AM
If I hit the frame with a wooden hammer handle or plastic headed hammer. This will spring the plane. but there are any inner parts will be fallen out and hard to be re-assembled? that is the only thing i worry about.

ChristopherG
November 23, 2005, 11:23 AM
but there are any inner parts will be fallen out and hard to be re-assembled

YES. That is exactly what I indicated in my cautionary post above. It is also unnecessary; why are you determined to do it?

efeng9622
November 23, 2005, 11:51 AM
I just like to disassemble every thing i have, but .I think I don't have enough experience.I wouldn't do it right now.

Thank you let me know !

ChristopherG
November 23, 2005, 01:06 PM
You are welcome. You can enjoy your revolver for many years without ever opening up the insides. Thee cleaning and lubrication instructions given in the links above will do everything you need.

oweno
November 23, 2005, 03:40 PM
I dug out a copy of S&W's magazine/catalog "Smith & Wesson Handguns 1995". In it, there's an article on how to care for your handgun. In the revolver section, the author says:

Clean the bore with a bore-cleaning solvent and a nylon bristled brush.

Clean the charge holes in the cylinder.

Using a mild solvernt, really clean the area under the extractor with a toothbrush-type brush. Don't oil the cylinder and extractor heavily.

Clean the area under the topstrap, especially over the barrel.

and now an exact quote:

"Lubricate the bore very lightly to avoid rapid particle buildup. Next, cock the hammer and apply one drop of oil in front of it, letting the oil run down into the internal works. Dry fire the gun a few times to distribute the oil in the mechanism. Remember, oil lightly. This is generally true for all pistols and revolvers. You want to oil it but too much lubricant attracts dust, grit, and unburned powder which can cause the gun to malfunction. Lubricating sparingly works best."

SJshooter
November 23, 2005, 06:03 PM
If you are determined to open it up, memorize this first:

http://www.thegunplace.com/images/revolver_cutaway.jpg

S&W620
November 23, 2005, 08:58 PM
On the subject, anyone familiar with or use a "BoreSnake"?

oweno
November 24, 2005, 07:00 AM
Boresnake? Yep, use 'em all the time - nifty item - I zip it through the barrel and through the cylinder holes and it really gets the crud out.

I've got them in different calibers for my various handguns. Well worth the money.

and Happy Thanksgiving all...

Owen

efeng9622
November 24, 2005, 11:58 AM
Thank you very much everybody here! Also, I like this map even I didn't open it
up.

Thanks again.

efeng9622
November 25, 2005, 07:14 PM
I don't know why the revolver_cutaway is gone!

If you are determined to open it up, memorize this first:

http://www.thegunplace.com/images/revolver_cutaway.jpg

efeng9622
November 30, 2005, 03:38 PM
To take off the sideplate after the grips and the plate screws are removed (only use a properly fitting screwdriver) hit the frame with a wooden hammer handle or plastic headed hammer. This will spring the plate. NEVER PRY THE SIDEPLATE.[/QUOTE]

Yesterday, I removed three screws and tried to use a wooden hammer handle to hit the frame, no matter how hard work I did, i still couldn't let the plate to fall out.i think i didn't use the corrected way, it is looks like there is something inside stably pull the plate . I had to give up.

Thanks!

mike240se
April 2, 2007, 02:28 AM
is it ok to use breakfree's bore cleaner on the cylinders? mine are caked up real good...

also, what should i use to clean the exterior of my 10-5 s&w .38 spl its nickel plated, the gunsmith said solvent on the exterior is what dulled my finish.....

TonyB
April 2, 2007, 09:27 AM
Breakfree is fine.I use it mostly as a lube,but it is a cleaner also.There are better one out there for cleaning,but with alittle elbow grease CLP is good.Not sure about nickle finished though,but I think breakfree is gentle enough for wipe down purposes.
hint:to clean cylinder holes use a brush that's one size bigger than the caliber.I use a .40 cal. one for my 38's.
FYI,I use Hoppe's Elite to clean bore and cylinder,and Breakfree as a lube and wipe down..

ChristopherG
April 2, 2007, 10:31 AM
what should i use to clean the exterior of my 10-5 s&w .38 spl its nickel plated, the gunsmith said solvent on the exterior is what dulled my finish.....

I don't see how solvent would 'dull' nickel--though nickel plating does requires some extra care. You specifically don't want to expose it for any great duration to a solvent that includes ammonia, which is used in copper-removing barrel cleaners. The nickel plating is underlain by a copper plating, and if ammonia gets in through tiny cracks in the nickel to eat away the copper basecoat, then the whole mess will come off in chips and flakes--not what you want.

Breakfree CLP does not have ammonia and should be fine. If your nickel plating is dulled, I'd recommend long, loving attention with a soft cloth and a quality polish.

davinci08
August 7, 2008, 11:53 AM
i dnt know the topstrap or cylinder throat. casn you be cleare vfor a novice? I have s&w 22 10 shots matte silver

davinci08
August 7, 2008, 11:54 AM
help me vern i am new to this sysyem

davinci08
August 7, 2008, 11:56 AM
I dont know how toclean n mt gun i never didv it--i hve oil and cleaner and stuff-do i use the bore snake at al or save it forv the trail.

davinci08
August 7, 2008, 11:59 AM
CAN i USE wd 40 ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE GUN? DO i COPPER BRUSH THE MUZZLE AND THE THECYLANDERS. thE i"m lost

davinci08
August 7, 2008, 12:02 PM
i DON'T KNOW WHAT i SHOULD CLEAN ON MY PISTOL OTHER THAN THE BORE AND CYLINDER HOLES WITH SOLVENT AND THEN OIL THEM. IS THERE ANYTHINGB ELSE i SHOLD CLEAN? wHATV OTHER THINGS--i DONT KNOW THE NAMES--SHOULD BE CLEANED
YOU CAN E MAIL ME AT DESHARICAULT@ YAHOO.COM
THANKS A LOT

20nickels
August 7, 2008, 03:20 PM
Davinci08,
Yes, WD40 is great for the outside. For the bore and chargeholes (if necessary) I like Hoppes #9.

The Bushmaster
August 7, 2008, 03:22 PM
Remove the cylinder and crane and maybe the grips if you are really messy. If you just purchased a used revolver you might remove the side plate to at least inspect it. If it is new refer to the first sentense...And don't worry about full disassemble for a number of years...

gizamo
August 7, 2008, 04:45 PM
What a bunch of Mamby Pambies....

Just kiddin guys....LOL

Actually, every new to me S&W gets taken apart and reassembled. While there, I generally do a tune.

I cannot recall how many problem guns I have bought from dealers that supposedly had timing/lock-up problems that were solved by a basic dissassembly and complete clean/reassemble...

I would bet it would be an amazing number of guns that went back to the factory, that just needed a good cleaning....I've watched folks at the range put the gun verticle (barrel up) and run a solvent soaked brush across the recoil sheild....Where they thought all that lead,carbon and solvent was going is beyond me ~ obviously a good deal was getting forced through the hand window (duh).....And then there are the older guns that got the "drops of oil" down the hammer. After about twenty years it congeals into a real mess.....

So what to do, google Jerry Miculeks' DVD about complete dissassembly, cleaning, and reassembly of S&W revolvers...He takes the novice through all the steps...and you won't believe the crud that accumulates in your gun....affecting it's action...

Giz

johnnylaw53
August 8, 2008, 06:16 AM
I don't think one should use WD 40 anywhere on a weapon. It is not oil it is make to repel water and it does penatrate well. which translate into if some get on your ammo it may get into the primer and kill the ammo. the out side should just be wiped with a somewhat oiled rag. Oh the boresnakes are great just don't forget to wash them now and then.

be safe

The Bushmaster
August 8, 2008, 10:12 AM
WD-40 is not a rust preventitive and should not be used on firearms...Not only that. It washes the oils off the metal and then evaporates leaving the gun unprotected...

hemiram
August 10, 2008, 12:41 AM
I would take every gun I ever bought completely apart (not to the point of driving pins out, but anything screw attached) and cleaned up an lubed it. I didn't like messing with the innards of the S&W and their clones, as they were a real hassle to put back together, just one of the reasons I like Dan Wessons so much, I can put one, and actually have built one, together from a boxful of parts in a couple of minutes..

WD40 is a no-no, IMO, I use CLP and Break Free, and some Castrol or Tufoil gun lube on the slide rails of my semiautos.

Ops Officer
August 10, 2008, 07:17 AM
Birchwood-Casey lead remover cloth is your friend for stainless revolvers, esp. for fouling between the topstrap and the forcing cone. But don't use it on blued finishes.

CajunBass
August 11, 2008, 10:13 AM
I took the sideplate off a Smith & Wesson revolver. Once. I was young, stupider than I am now, and didn't know any better.

I boggered up a couple of screws, then chipped the sideplate when I pryed it off. I was smart enough to stop there when I saw the internals.

Learn from my stupid mistakes.

Don't do it.

Or at least learn to do it right.

Zip7
August 11, 2008, 12:45 PM
The handiest thing you will ever get for cleaning is those wax/silicone impregnated hoppes cleaning rags. They are usually yellow. Especially if you have blued guns. I always have several in my box.

I take my single actions apart, clean the inside of the frame and the cylinder, bore, base pin etc. with hoppes #9 solvent. I try not to get much of that in the action.

Once I've scrubbed all those well, using the bore brush for the bore and cylinder chambers, followed by a jag & patch, I will spray all over with a evaporating cleaner/degreaser like electrical contact cleaner or brake cleaner, or hoppes cleaner/degreaser to get rid of the #9.

I then run a jag with an oiled patch through the cylinder holes and the bore (and the base pin hole on SA). mist the whole gun lightly with silicone spray lube (available at most automotive stores - cheap) and wipe off / polish everything I can reach with the Hoppes rags. Once one gets pretty dirty or dry, I toss it and use a new one.

I tend to stay away from WD40 type products, and there are a lot of them. WD 40 is supposed to be a penetrating oil + cleaner + lube. It does these things too, but for lube I use plain silicone spray lube, and for cleaning, I use straight cleaner/degreaser. Penetrating oil is not necessary for firearms maintenance unless your guns is rusted up badly.

Again - the hoppes rags are your friends.

EddieCoyle
August 11, 2008, 01:25 PM
I remove the cylinder every time I clean my revolvers. I find it much easier to thoroughly clean the cylinder when it is off the frame.

For stainless guns, I drop the cylinder into a plastic jar with a 50/50 mix of Simple Green and water. Leave it in overnight and even the worst burn rings will wipe right off.

If you enjoyed reading about "How to clean , Lubricate a revolver?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!