.32ACP PPK


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Kentucky Rifle
April 3, 2003, 10:37 AM
I've never owned a PPK so I'd appreciate a little advice here. My wife's father is going to buy one. It's advertized as a French made "Manhurin" (I probably spelled that wrong, but you know what I mean) police trade in with the condition being listed as "very good". He asked me about the pistol last night and, rather than guess, I told him I'd ask you guys and get back to him. Apparently, a gun shop in a nearby town made a purchase of several of these pistols. They're all blue. Is that model PPK any good?

Thanks,
KR

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RON in PA
April 3, 2003, 02:50 PM
Is that a PPK or a PP? The reason I ask is because there are a bunch of milsurplus (Euro-police surplus) in the country presently. Just a bit larger than the PPK. Well made guns, but a wimpy cartridge( I have a German made Walther PP actually made in Germany after Walther and the French parted company, but the Manurheins are just as good and all Walthers with s/n below 700,000 were French made even if marked and proofed in Germany). True PPKs have not been importable since 1968 because of their small size and that is the reason for the PPK/S version with the PP sized grip.

JBP
April 3, 2003, 04:51 PM
I just ordered one from Centerfire Systems after going back over to TFL and doing a search on Manhurin. The posts were mostly favorable. The .32 ACP is not my favorite round but I just renewed my C&R and that's the first thing to come up that I did not have that looked pretty decent.

DMK
April 3, 2003, 04:56 PM
JBP, I just got my Manhurin PP from Centerfire. It's got beautiful bluing. There's very minor holster wear at the nose, but a little cold blue fixed that right up.

First thing I did was field strip it and detail strip the slide to clean all the storage dust out and soak it in FP-10 overnight. It's a very nicely made pistol. I usually replace all the springs on my C&R pistols, but this one didn't even need that.

I'd highly recomend getting a Manhurin PP that's in good shape. The CZ-70 is another nice pistol of this style and caliber, perhaps better in many ways except finish.

gumshoe4
April 3, 2003, 08:37 PM
KR, I had seen these guns advertised in the CDNN catalog and was in despair thinking that they would never be sold here in the PRK, but a local dealer here in CA is selling them as C&Rs. The guns are supposed to be ex-police guns.

I have no logical reason whatever to buy this gun, but I've always wanted a Walther (or clone) PP in 7.65mm (.32 ACP), so I bought one. Like DMK's gun, mine has beautiful bluing with a little honest holster wear. It came with a "shoulder holster", two mags (one flat bottom and the other a finger grip), a cleaning rod and the original box. I have not yet shot it, but the DA trigger pull, although a little heavy, is very smooth. I believe it'll do fine at the range. This gun is tight and ready for range time and I'm really glad I got it.

I've ordered another mag for it and a set of rosewood contour grips from www.handgungrips.com which will really spruce the gun up. I'm not fond of the factory bakelite grips on the gun and the finger grip mag).

I think you could do far worse than to consider one of these fine little pistols. The workmanship is great, the condition (at least of mine) is very acceptable and it's definitely a little piece of shooting history. Wouldn't make a bad personal defense gun, either, for a person sensitive to recoil.

Bob
TFL# 8032

gumshoe4
April 3, 2003, 08:40 PM
I forgot to add a little of the history of the Manurhin PP.

After WW II, Walther and other German arms manufacturers were forbidden under the surrender agreement to produce firearms. In order to get around this, Walther made an agreement with Manurhin, a French firearms maker, to build PPs under license. It would appear to me that the design, engineering and quality of construction are essentially as good as the Walther guns made in Germany.

tbeb
April 3, 2003, 09:02 PM
I have a .32 ACP Manurhin PP. Paid $225 used very good. Came with 2 owner's manuals--one German, one English, and a spare magazine. It is reliable with 71 gr. FMJ, and Speer Gold Dot 60 gr. JHP. (Doesn't like Silvertip or Corbon JHP's. Failures to eject with Silvertip and failures to feed with Corbon.) It is very accurate.

cslinger
April 4, 2003, 09:52 AM
I have a Manurhin Walther PP in .32 and it is one of the most beautiful guns I own. The bluing is very very nice and the fit and finish is very exacting.

I have only used FMJ ammo but have had no problems at all. The only things that you have to watch out for, in my experience, is slide bite and heavy double action triggers.

I have small hands so slide bite doesn't concern me but the double action triggers on these guns, at least when new, are very, very, very, heavy. My guess is they were designed this way because the manufacturer new that they would just be thrown into pockets and what not without any kind of trigger protection.

I love mine. Not so much for it's uber, tactical, usefullness but more fore it's classic lines, beautiful bluing and ohh so Bond appeal. Besides a .32 caliber fmj bullet is like a brick through a plate glass window on the power spectrum.:rolleyes:

The only Walther PP/PPK/PPKS I have been told to avoid are the interarms imports of the late 70s and 80s. These apparently were not Walther quality by a long shot.

Everybody I have talked to who has a Manurhin is very happy with the quality and reliability. I know I am.

Chris

461
April 4, 2003, 12:13 PM
Everything I've ever heard about the Manurhin pistols has been favorable. I have a prewar model PP in .32acp and a fairly recent PPK/s and love them both. Both are highly accurate and have yet to have any jams at all in well over a thousand rounds out of each. I had the Prewar PP done up in Met-A-Life as the bluing was almost all gone and had a little pitting and now it looks as good as it shoots. Now all you collectors don't start jumping down my throat, the gun was a mess when I got it so there was no collector value at all. Buy it, they're great.

Kentucky Rifle
April 4, 2003, 01:31 PM
You're right. I called my FIL and it's a "PP". You guys have just about convinced me to buy one also! Of course, everybody KNOWS how difficult it is to convince ME to purchase a new pistol.:rolleyes:

KR

BHP9
April 4, 2003, 07:30 PM
Is that a PPK or a PP? The reason I ask is because there are a bunch of milsurplus (Euro-police surplus) in the country presently. Just a bit larger than the PPK. Well made guns, but a wimpy cartridge( I have a German made Walther PP actually made in Germany after Walther and the French parted company, but the Manurheins are just as good and all Walthers with s/n below 700,000 were French made even if marked and proofed in Germany). True PPKs have not been importable since 1968 because of their small size and that is the reason for the PPK/S version with the PP sized grip

After WW II, Walther and other German arms manufacturers were forbidden under the surrender agreement to produce firearms. In order to get around this, Walther made an agreement with Manurhin, a French firearms maker, to build PPs under license. It would appear to me that the design, engineering and quality of construction are essentially as good as the Walther guns made in Germany.

I see from these posts that there is a lot of misuderstanding about the Walthers made after WII.

There were absolutely no Walthers made in Germany after WWII and I have a letter from the President of Manurhin that details this.

Pistols stamped "Made in Germany" after WWII were not. They were all made by Manurhin then shipped to Germany where they were proof tested , stamped "Made in Germany",and then blued and then shipped out for export to many countries.

Manurhin PP series pistols are the finest in the world being made with outstanding workmanship and made of only first class materiels, no junk castings, no junk plastic or sheet metal.

The only thing I take issue with is the caliber. Its a realatively weak one and I personally carry mine with full metal jacketed ammo not trusting the lighter 60 grain soft points to have the necessary penetration necessary for defense from all angles of fire.

gumshoe4
April 4, 2003, 09:30 PM
"There were absolutely no Walthers made in Germany after WWII and I have a letter from the President of Manurhin that details this."

Isn't that what I said?



Bob
TFL# 8032:

Tamara
April 5, 2003, 02:42 AM
Manurhin PP series pistols are the finest in the world being made with outstanding workmanship and made of only first class materiels, no junk castings, no junk plastic or sheet metal.

...too bad mine wouldn't feed three consecutive rounds no matter what we did to it.

That little Manure .32 was a durned accurate single-shot, though, considering that it had a trigger like a piece of agricultural machinery and sights that couldn't be seen without a scanning electron microscope. :D

gumshoe4
April 5, 2003, 11:17 AM
Thanks, Tamara. I feel a lot better about my purchase, now.

It'll be interesting to see whether the gun functions properly when I take it to the range or whether it's possible that you maybe just got a bad one. In either case, I'll be sure to post the range results right here, bad or good.

Bob
TFL# 8032

Tamara
April 5, 2003, 11:51 AM
Mine was a very early Manhurin gun*, which might explain why it was rough as a cob. (Still had real pretty bluing, though...) I suspect the problems were largely due to the magazine, but I wasn't going to spend a lot of money tracking down PP mags for a gun that I'd paid $75 for on a lark. We tried one other mag (PP mags don't grow on trees :( ) and it improved things somewhat (Down to one or two jams per mag), but by then the shiny had kind of worn off the project for me. I ended up trading it for a Mauser HSc.





*Doubly interesting for being Manhurin marked but a pre-GCA'68 gun. (ie No importer's marks.) Apparently it had been bought overseas at one time and brought home.

David S
April 5, 2003, 12:41 PM
so is Centerfire a pretty reputable dealer? they seem to have a few PPs in stock....

Al Thompson
April 5, 2003, 04:04 PM
I think Centerfire is fine. I've purchased stuff from them before.

My Manhurin PPK/S in .22 works very well for a Euro .22. Like stingers, chokes on cheap stuff.

Also had one of the .32's converted to .380 that shot fine.

BHP9
April 5, 2003, 05:10 PM
Mine was a very early Manhurin gun*, which might explain why it was rough as a cob. (Still had real pretty bluing, though...) I suspect the problems were largely due to the magazine, but I wasn't going to spend a lot of money tracking down PP mags for a gun that I'd paid $75 for on a lark. We tried one other mag (PP mags don't grow on trees ) and it improved things somewhat (Down to one or two jams per mag), but by then the shiny had kind of worn off the project for me. I ended up trading it for a Mauser HSc.

Now we are getting closer to the truth. I never have seen a bad Manurhin and magazine problems due to being damaged or neglected certainly will cause any auto pistol to fail no matter how well made it is.

I urge everyone to get your Manuhrin now before they are all gone. I just got back from a large gun show today and the dealers are buying them up and reselling them for $400 and up and they were selling them with no problems at todays show.

The little .32's can be loaded very economically with cast bullets and they feed and function just fine. Sometimes deals can even be had with fmj foreign made ammo. Recoil is lighter than the .380 and I seem to shoot the .32 a little better than my .380 Walthers that by the way were made by Manuhrin and have never failed me with either cast or jackted ammo.

Quality wise there is just no comparison to these little jewels that will never be made again because of all the high quality materiels and workmanship that went into them. Take a look yourself at one and I guarentee you will probably buy one.

And by the way if you get a good deal on one as they are avertised right now at give away prices you can probably double your money on it a soon as tomorrow. The dealers are in heaven right now because of the huge profits they are making on them.

Even if I paid $400. for one I would not feel bad because they are actually that good a pistol. Take a look at what you would pay for todays modern made junk and you will see what I am talking about.

By the way I have ownd several Mauser Hsc pistols and had problems with all of them. You can forget shooting most hollow points or soft points out of them. They have a very steep feed ramp and are best used with fmj ammo. I have seen even fjm ammo jam in these pistols. Cast bullets are impossible to use in these guns also. I owned a war time gun and 3 commercial guns down through the years and all would occasionally jam up with full metal jacketed ammo.

BHP9
April 5, 2003, 05:25 PM
That little Manure .32 was a durned accurate single-shot, though, considering that it had a trigger like a piece of agricultural machinery and sights that couldn't be seen without a scanning electron microscope.

Come on Tamara get serious. The sights found on these Walthers are way better than many pocket pistols being made today. They were by the way made for concealed carry not winning bullseye matches and the sights are plenty good enough for the intended purposes.

Lets face it if a guy like me with cataracts can bounce a tin can all over the place at 25 yards most of the people with normal eyesight will be extremely deadly with these little jewels of a pistol.

Trigger pulls on all my Walthers in the single shot mode are absolutey perfect that break like glass with no creep whatsoever. Double action pulls are naturally heavier but very smooth. I have no trouble at all hitting man size targets in double action mode a 7 and 10 yards and I can hit milk jugs in the single action mode at 60 yards.

You simply must be talking about some off brand look alike Walther and not the real Mccoy.

BHP9
April 5, 2003, 05:46 PM
To Tamara:

I just got to thinking there may be another explanation as to the problems you were having.

There were some Walthes made during the cold war years by the Communists that were in control in East Germany. These pistols were very crude and I have looked at some of them a gun shows and speculated that they were cerainly not built to the standards that the Post War Manuhrin guns were built to.

I suppose if you must get technical there were Walthers built in Germany after WWII but not by the West Germans and not available to the West or in the U.S.

Tamara you missed out on the golden opportunity to turn on the flame thrower. I was not 100 per cent correct when I said no Walther PP series pistols were made in Germany after WWII (they were being made in Communist east Germany) they just were not available or even known to the average person until recently.

It would not surpise me that this is the gun that you had, an East German Walther not a high quality one as made by Manuhrin.

Tamara
April 5, 2003, 06:41 PM
Come on Tamara get serious. The sights found on these Walthers are way better than many pocket pistols being made today.

I'm perfectly serious. You can get Novaks on simlarly-sized Kahrs and such. The PP/PPK sights are from a different era; sights have come a long way since then.

By the way I have ownd several Mauser Hsc pistols and had problems with all of them. You can forget shooting most hollow points or soft points out of them. They have a very steep feed ramp and are best used with fmj ammo.

Of course; that's what they were designed for.

It would not surpise me that this is the gun that you had, an East German Walther not a high quality one as made by Manuhrin.

Nope, it was definitely a French-made Manurhin. (The second high-quality mag didn't fix the problem, as noted.)

Tamara
April 5, 2003, 07:08 PM
They have a very steep feed ramp

Yup. Boy, look at how steep it is! ;)

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?s=&postid=211447

Tamara
April 5, 2003, 07:46 PM
There were absolutely no Walthers made in Germany after WWII and I have a letter from the President of Manurhin that details this.

Maybe you should scan or transcribe that letter for us, since all other sources (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=walther+PPK+post-war+german) say that Walther once again began manufacture of the PP/PPK series pistols in Germany in the 1980s. I'd be interested to see your documentation.

RON in PA
April 5, 2003, 09:24 PM
BHP9...

According to Dieter Marschall in his year 2000 book, "Walther Pistols, Models 1 Through P99", the PPs made after 1985 with s/n greater than 700,000 were made in Germany, not France.

BHP9
April 6, 2003, 08:10 PM
According to Dieter Marschall in his year 2000 book, "Walther Pistols, Models 1 Through P99", the PPs made after 1985 with s/n greater than 700,000 were made in Germany, not France.

You were not paying attention to what I was saying. We were talking about the PP series of pistols not other walthers like the P99 plastic guns.

BHP9
April 6, 2003, 08:14 PM
Maybe you should scan or transcribe that letter for us, since all other sources say that Walther once again began manufacture of the PP/PPK series pistols in Germany in the 1980s. I'd be interested to see your documentation.

For those who would like to read the entire letter it is to be found in the "Original and real Swat Magazine" in the Year 1982, I cannot remember what months issue. When I get the time I will post the exact month of the issue in question.

The truth would probably never have been known if it had not been for the fact that the French lost the right to the Mauser banner label and it was given to to the Americans after they started to produce the PP series of pistols in America. Perhaps the biggest mistake Walther ever made. The reputation damage that Walther sustained from the shoddy workmanship of the American made guns lost it a lot of buisness and money right up to this very day.

RON in PA
April 7, 2003, 12:47 AM
So you quoted a 1982 magazine article, that explains your statement that no PPs were made in Germany after WW2 , Walther started making them in Germany in 1985.

If my memory serves me correctly no PPs were ever made in the US, only PPks and yes they were garbage.

Tamara
April 7, 2003, 12:55 AM
You were not paying attention to what I was saying. We were talking about the PP series of pistols not other walthers like the P99 plastic guns.

You were not paying attention to what he was saying: "the PPs made after 1985 with s/n greater than 700,000 were made in Germany, not France." Hope this helps. ;)

For those who would like to read the entire letter it is to be found in the "Original and real Swat Magazine" in the Year 1982,

Ah, so you don't have the letter (as you claimed you did), just an old back issue of S.W.A.T. printed before they started making PP/PPK's in Germany again. Interesting...

Jaco
April 7, 2003, 03:29 AM
Kentucky Rifle,

To get back to the point, I have a Manurhin PPK in .32 that is my carry pistol, and is completely reliable with all ammo, and not have one jam in about 500 rounds. Buy one, you won't be sorry, the quality is simply superb.

BHP9
April 7, 2003, 08:56 AM
I looked through about 5 years of Articles and I am still looking for the letter. But I did find this other article from "Firepower Magazaine" dated March of 1988.

I will see if this picture of page 39 comes out readable. If it does not here is what some of it says.

It is no secret that these weapons even though marked made in German, have actually been manufactured in France since the end of WWII. The maker, Manurhin, has started importing these pistols under their own name and selling them at a price considerabley less than the Walther marked weapons imported by Interarms. Same quality, same pistol, just marked Manurhin instead fof Walther.

BHP9
April 7, 2003, 09:09 AM
Yup. Boy, look at how steep it is

I disagree. The Walther feed ramp is clearly showing it is almost a straight inline feed. Thats why you can use practically any bullet in them as I have done so , even blunt nose cast bullets.

I found it impossible to use most cast bullets with the extremely steep feed ramp as found on the Mauser HSC. A conical may have worked but the conicals available to me at the time were to heavy a bullet for the Mauser and even if I had had a lighter cast bullet I still have my doubts as if it would have worked.

BHP9
April 7, 2003, 09:22 AM
According to Dieter Marschall in his year 2000 book, "Walther Pistols, Models 1 Through P99", the PPs made after 1985 with s/n greater than 700,000 were made in Germany, not France.

I do remember Interarms selling Walther PP's stamped made in Germany during the 1980's but since I had seen nothing in print since the two Articles about all the Walthers being Manurhin made pistols I had assumed that these guns were also Manurhins.

If the author of this book is correct then there were PP pistols made in Germany but Not PPk or PPk's pistols.

I did not see Interarms advertising any of the PPk or PPk's pistols as being made in Germany during this time period. The only ones available were either American made guns or two small batches of Manurhin stamped guns that came and went very quickly.

If the author is correct then Then I stand corrected. but only on the manufacture of the PP pistols not the PPk or PPk's pistols.

Tamara
April 7, 2003, 09:30 AM
1 (http://www.saaaca.org.za/links/SIG/walther/walther.htm)
Fritz Walther fled Germany in June 1945, carrying with him the drawings of the PP. He also retained the rights to the many Walther patents granted over the years. Accordingly, he was able to license production of the PP in 1950 to the French firm Manufacture de Machines de Haut-Rhin, better known as Manhurin. They began production of the PP in 1952 at serial number 100 001. In 1973 the company already made more than 700 000 PP’s and production at the Manhurin factory stopped in the late 1980’s. In 1987 the Walther factory in Ulm took over the PP and PPK production while Manhurin dropped out of the business to concentrate on its own firearms products. As a result PP type pistols made by Manhurin are now collector’s items in their own right.
2 (http://www.geocities.com/pentagon/quarters/2188)
In 1950, the Manufacture de Machines du Haut-Rhin of Mulhouse, France started to build Walther PP's and PPK's and P.38's under license. Manurhin started in 1952 with the PP and the PPK in 1953. The Walther quality remained in these licensed copies, and kept the Walther name in the public eye untill such time they could start manufacturing again. Most PPK and PPK/S models were still manufactured in France untill as late as 1986. Parts were shipped to Walther in Ulm for final fitting, finishing, stamping, proofing, and assembly. In 1986 Walther took over production of the PP series ending their licensing agreement with Manhurin.

Tamara
April 7, 2003, 09:33 AM
I disagree. The Walther feed ramp is clearly showing it is almost a straight inline feed. Thats why you can use practically any bullet in them as I have done so , even blunt nose cast bullets.

Uh, that picture is of the HSc feedramp. Thank you for proving my point. ;)

BHP9
April 7, 2003, 09:35 AM
In 1950, the Manufacture de Machines du Haut-Rhin of Mulhouse, France started to build Walther PP's and PPK's and P.38's under license. Manurhin started in 1952 with the PP and the PPK in 1953. The Walther quality remained in these licensed copies, and kept the Walther name in the public eye untill such time they could start manufacturing again. Most PPK and PPK/S models were still manufactured in France untill as late as 1986. Parts were shipped to Walther in Ulm for final fitting, finishing, stamping, proofing, and assembly. In 1986 Walther took over production of the PP series ending their licensing agreement with Manhurin

Once again this is stating it is the PP not the PPk or PPks

I think of this were not so Interarms would surely have sold the PPks pistols stamped made in Germany and Walther would never have licensed the U.S. maker to make their PPKs pistols here.

Tamara
April 7, 2003, 09:44 AM
"PP series" is generally held to include the PP, PPK, and PPK/S. You used the reference yourself in this fashion on the previous page.

(No comment on the HSc feedramp pic? ;) )

BHP9
April 7, 2003, 09:48 AM
I think this explains why the Manurhin pistols were no longer imported. They not only lost the Walther banner trademark but were not allowed to make the guns anymore. When the parts to build them and the guns that were stocked ran out that was the end of them.

BHP9
April 7, 2003, 09:53 AM
Tamara you can play all the foolish games you wish but those of us out there that have owned and used both pistols [B]in the flesh[/B know that the feed ramp of the Mauser Hsc is twice as steep as the Walthers. If it were not so then the Mauser would feed as well as the Walther which it surey doesn't and never will.

Tamara
April 7, 2003, 09:57 AM
Playing games? I posted a picture, to which you responded "I disagree. The Walther feed ramp is clearly showing it is almost a straight inline feed.", when the feedramp in question was that of an HSc. Is it no longer clearly showing it's almost a straight inline feed? :confused:

but those of us out there that have owned and used both pistols [B]in the flesh[/B know that the feed ramp of the Mauser Hsc is twice as steep as the Walthers.

"In the flesh"? That's pretty funny... How do you think I got that picture, out of curiousity?

BHP9
April 7, 2003, 10:01 AM
I think everyone knows that trying to look a posted picture in no way is the same as looking at the gun in the flesh.

If I still had my Hsc I could post some really neat pictures (if I had a digital camera) of the dead lock jams these Mausers cause with cast bullets. AS a matter of fact the firing pin spring was so weak in these guns that the firing pin would pop out of the breach face and further complicate matters by locking the round into the feed ramp below it. When it did this it even jamed up with full metal jacketed ammo.

Tamara
April 7, 2003, 10:06 AM
I think everyone knows that trying to look a posted picture in no way is the same as looking at the gun in the flesh.

Apparently HSc's and PPK's are pretty hard to tell apart in posted pictures, too... ;) :D

gumshoe4
April 7, 2003, 09:43 PM
BHP9, hate to say it, but she got you good, dude. You incorrectly misinterpreted the photo, got caught obfuscating about model designations and otherwise picking nits. Tamara has clearly shown that, contrary to your statement, Walther has manufactured the PP and PPK series pistols in Germany since WWII.

Now I love my PP and I'm going to be really disappointed if it ain't a shooter. Truthfully, I'm not all that happy with Tamara throwing sand in my face about my dream purchase, either, but the bottom line is that you lost the argument. It's time to be a man and admit it and BOTH OF YOU, for PETE'S SAKE-can we return to the topic, PLEASE??

Anyone ELSE care to share their experiences shooting their POSTWAR Manurhin PP .32 pistols? PLEASE? I need cheering up...currently thinking that I sunk a bunch of $$ in a piece of crap, thanks to Tamara.

Bob

Al Thompson
April 7, 2003, 10:02 PM
Bob, the one I have and the ones I've either owned or shot work fine. Don't take too much from one person's example - FWIW, I had a Dan Wesson that was idioticly finicky and a bud's Blackhawk had the hammer spur break off. Stuff happens.

Even if your .32 dosen't suit you, the price will go up. :)

Stevie-Ray
April 7, 2003, 10:07 PM
PLEASE? I need cheering up...currently thinking that I sunk a bunch of $$ in a piece of crap, thanks to Tamara. :D Sorry, I have no comfort for you. I just can't help but find this thread both informative and amusing.

I've only shot a Walther PPK at one range session. Actually I couldn't hit crap with it.:rolleyes:

David S
April 8, 2003, 12:13 AM
well, im pretty much set on picking up one of these manurhin PPs from crossfire err centerfire, whatever that company is..........

I know the grips are marked differently but is the slide still marked with the walther banner?

Tamara
April 8, 2003, 12:25 AM
Relax until you've taken it to the range, at least; one lemon does not a series of junk guns make. :cool:

David S,

I haven't really looked into this latest run of imports; my PP had only Manurhin markings (no Walther or importer stamps) and was marked Fabrique en Francais or whatever, rather than beingGerman-proofed.

Jaco
April 8, 2003, 02:18 AM
Tamara,

Talking about in the flesh, I've never seen a HSC. How does it's size compare to the PPK?

Kentucky Rifle
April 8, 2003, 11:23 AM
PLUS, the chuckle.:p

KR

David S
April 9, 2003, 12:21 AM
hey post a pic of that mauser please.......the whole gun this time.................

Also anyone got any pics of the manhurin PPs? id like to see the markings

Tamara
April 9, 2003, 12:31 AM
The HSc is on the top right...

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?s=&postid=77044

Nick96
April 9, 2003, 01:13 AM
I'm suprised there are any "Police Trade In's" left. I bought one around 1986. There must have been a bunch of them. As mostly stated previously; mine was a Manhurin PP, 7.65MM (.32 Auto), very nice blueing, two mags (one with & one w/o pinky rest), very accurate, very comfortable to shoot and for the first few years very reliable. The one I got was made in the mid 1950's. I shot it a lot and never have FTF or FTE problems. Mine quit resetting to SA mode occasionally. Both an irritation and sometimes painful when the trigger snapped forward. On internal inspection I noticed the sear block frame pin hole (for lack of a better discription) had started to wallow out. Everything else was okay - barrel, slide, mags, etc. But similar to Tamera's issue - it just wasn't worth putting a lot of money into a gun that didn't cost much to begin with - and in a caliber I didn't really have much use for.

Actually, I liked that little pistol so much early on that I bought a new Interarms licenced Walther PPK/S in .380. What a piece of junk. Actually two of them. Sent one in for repairs about two weeks after I got it and they sent me a whole new gun. The one they sent me was junk too. Nothing near the quality, fit, finish and reliability of the Manhurin PP. I ended up getting rid of the PPK/S within 4 months - but kept and enjoyed the PP for many more years.

Oleg Volk
April 9, 2003, 08:20 AM
Recently surplussed PP seemed reliable and accurate, though a little large for a .32 and still a little sharp around the edges. Wouldn't feel unarmed with it. HEAVY DA trigger, decent SA, OK sights.

HSc photos (http://www.olegvolk.net/newphotos/tn/hsc/)

Jaco
April 9, 2003, 08:47 AM
Oleg,

Are you now going to use a real PP or PPK in your photo's, or stick to the Interarms one? ;)

gumshoe4
April 28, 2003, 12:55 AM
In exercising my preference for beating deceased caballos, I am pleased to report that I finally got my Manurhin PP .32 ACP to the range today. 1 or 2 minor misfeeds with MagTech 71-grain, otherwise ran fine. Fun to shoot, almost recoilless. Don't like the bakelite grips, so I'll be getting some nice wood grips for it later.

Bob

Oleg Volk
April 30, 2003, 10:00 AM
Are you now going to use a real PP or PPK in your photo's, or stick to the Interarms one?

I have access to a PP these days...maybe ought to click a few pics of it.

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